AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

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Jayne Corso

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017  is only days away, so let’s focus on social media for the conference! Here are a few tips I have compiled for staying social during an event, especially through Twitter!  Why Twitter? Twitter makes your posts visible to people who aren’t already in your networking, therefore, increasing your reach.

Hot Tip: Use the Correct Hashtag

Almost all events have a hashtag, and Evaluation 2017 is no exception. Use #Eval17 when sharing posts related to the conference. Nothing is more frustrating than tweeting at an event then later realizing you used the wrong hashtag and have missed out on conversations. Through #Eval17, you can connect with others at the event and share your thoughts and comments on sessions, content, and presenters.

Hot Tip: Find the Right Balance

Sometimes it can be difficult to figure out how often you should be tweeting at a conference. Your posts should be informative and valuable, so you want to find the happy medium in content. My suggestion is 2-3 tweets per session. This gives you the opportunity to still have a social media presence without missing valuable education and networking time.

Hot Tip: Share Valuable Information

As mentioned above, you want your posts to be valuable to other attendees or even evaluators who couldn’t attend the conference. So, how can you do this?

1) Try asking questions – this can often spark a conversation. 2) Be helpful – share session suggestions, speakers you have enjoyed, topics that were interesting, and even restaurant tips. 3) Share photos and videos – visual content often receives more engagement than simple text postings, so this is a great way to share your experience with others.

Hot Tip: Have Fun

Have fun using social media! Your posts do not need to be series or educational. We enjoy seeing your personality poke through and how you are interacting with all aspects of the conference.

And one for LinkedIn…

Hot Tip: Make Connections on LinkedIn instead of Twitter

If you want to connect with a speaker or attendee, try LinkedIn instead of Twitter. LinkedIn is a more professional social media platform and an introduction on LinkedIn is often more personal and noticeable.

I will be tweeting at Evaluation 2017! I look forward to seeing your posts!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on theaea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I often use Twitter to communicate with AEA members and the evaluation community. It is an effective tool for sharing information and staying relevant in conversations. I have compiled a few tips that will help you compose tweets of your own!

Hot Tip: Keep tweets conversational

Twitter allows for informal conversations. Your posts should be professional, but not overly formal or business-like. This is your opportunity to show your personality or the personality of your organization.

Hot Tip: Talk with people

Twitter is a social media site, social being the key word. When composing tweets, make sure your posts are talking to people and not at people. Tag organization or people in your posts, respond to direct messages, and engage with people who are using your hashtag to stay up-to-date with conversations that are taking place online.

Hot Tip: Keep it short

You only have 140 characters to work with, so keep your message streamlined and to the point. Try to avoid fillers such as “check out”, “see what’s new”, or “Its almost here”. These phrases can add un-necessary length to your post.

Hot Tip: Tell your followers where you are taking them

When you provide a link in your post, identify what you are linking to. This can be a video, articles, or maybe a pdf document. Simply put [VIDEO] in front of your link.

I look forward to engaging with you on Twitter! Follow us @aeaweb!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

As a community manager, I create weekly posts for AEA’s Facebook and Twitter pages. Although you can share similar content on Facebook and Twitter, your approach should be unique for each channel. I have put together a few tips for composing text for both Facebook and Twitter.

Facebook:

Hot Tip: Keep it to 80 characters

The Facebook character limit is technically 63,206; however, when posting on Facebook, you should try to keep your text within 80 characters. Long text or stories should be shared on your blog and are not right for this Facebook.

Hot Tip: Don’t just post a link

Facebook is a great channel for sharing blog posts or linking to external content, but don’t just post the link. Be sure to add context to your post to grab the attention of your followers.

Hot Tip: Use images

Facebook posts that use images receive more engagement than posts without images. To bring more diversity to your page, allow your image to do the talking by adding supporting text. This can help reduce the amount of characters you use in your posts.

Twitter:

Hot Tip: Keep it simple

Twitter has a character limit of 140, but studies have shown that posts that are 120-130 in length receive better engagement. Source

Hot Tip: Grammar is still important

With a limited character allotment, many people want to shorten their postings by using acronyms, shortened words, or incorrect grammar. These tricks can make your post hard to read and understand.

Hot Tip: Don’t go crazy with hashtags

Hashtags are a great way to categorize your twitter posts and make them searchable for twitter users. However, you only want to use 1-2 hashtags in a single post. To many can be distracting and a waste of space, you are better off filling your post with additional content.

Good luck crafting your posts!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Posting on multiple social media sites requires good imagery, and on a low budget this can be tough. Images make your content eye-catching and can even add context to a post. On all channels, posting with images out preforms those without images. Canva is an easy and free way to create your own graphics, charts, infographics, and images. Today, I will show you how to create an image using free Canva formats, layouts, and photos.

Rad Resource: Choose your format

Each social media channel has a preferred image size. This size will allow your photos to be clearly viewed in a newsfeed. Canva takes the guess work out, and helps you create images specifically for each channel. They have an array of sizes you can choose from. You can even create a custom design by entering your own dimensions. For this example, we will be choosing the Facebook post format.

Rad Resource: Find a Layout

Canva offer many free layout that you can edit with your own content. Simply click on the layout you like and it will be added to your canvas.

Rad Resource: Edit your image

Once you have selected your desired layout, you can now add photos and text to your image. If you have a photo you would like to use, simply upload it to Canva under “uploads”. If you don’t have a photo, you’re in luck. Canva offers high quality stock photos for free. Browse the collection and find the one that works for your graphic. Once you find the photo, drag it onto the canvas.

Next, click on the text of your image and update the content. You can also change the color of text and backgrounds as you desire.

Once you are happy with your creation, download your image by selecting the “download” button in the right corner. Now you can post it to Facebook and promote your webinar!

I look forward to seeing lots of designs in my newsfeed!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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meHi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I was recently asked how I find and choose articles to post on the AEA social media sites, so I thought I would share my resources with everyone. When posting on social media, I try to maintain a good mix of association news, to keep our community informed about AEA, and evaluation news, to keep our community informed and about trends and lessons learned in evaluation. Here is where I pull my information:

Rad Resource: Twitter

Twitter is an excellent resource for finding content. I will often search relevant hashtags such as #Eval, #Evaluation, and #DataViz to find posts relating to these topics. I do have to do a little digging to make sure I find articles and resources that are informative, reliable, and can relate back to our community – but the content I find is often very rich and diverse.

In addition to searching on twitter, I follow many evaluators who are using the platform. This is helpful, because I can then see what other evaluators are posting 1) to share their content on our sites and 2) to gain a better understanding on what content is relevant and trending in evaluation. Here’s just a few evaluators I follow:

annkemery | Ann K. Emery

clysy | Christopher Lysy

EJaneDavidson | Jane Davidson

EvaluationMaven | Kylie Hutchinson

John_Gargani | John Gargani

Rad Resource: Evaluation Blogs

I follow a lot of evaluation blogs to find insights from our members. I often share posts that I believe are relevant and will resonate with our community. These blog posts allow AEA to share multiple points of view on evaluation related topics. Below are a few blogs that I use for my “go-to” resources:

BetterEvalution

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity

Evergreen Data Blog

Ann K. Emery’s blog

Eval Central

Rad Resource: Resources from AEA

AEA has a whole page of great resources for finding evaluation content. Click here to see evaluators that are active on social media and an array of evaluation related blogs. This is a great starting point for curating content for your social media posts!

I hope this information is helpful. If you have other great evaluation resources, please share them in the comments. Get busy posting!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. As we reach the end of 2016, I wanted to provide some insights on what is predicted for social media platforms for 2017. I put together this list based on numerous industry blogs and my own insights. Let’s see what happens in 2017!

2017

Hot Tip: Quality Vs. Quantity

Platforms such as Instagram where users typically post once or twice per day are on the rise. This relates to the need for content that has more substance and is not overwhelming. Twitter is built for multiple posts, but often the posts have a short lifespan, and can clutter a news feed. Will we start to see twitter decline or change in the near future?

I also believe users will be looking for trustworthy platforms that are dedicated to showing true content. In the wake of speculation of social media spreading “fake news”, I expect Facebook and similar platforms to make this a priority in 2017.

Hot Tip: Show Users Your Event

With the popularity of Facebook Live and Snap Chat, it is no longer enough to just post about an event. You have to show the event through real-time videos and pictures. These tools make your users feel like they are a part of the action.

Hot Tip: Storytelling Will Continue to be King

Although no stranger to 2016, storytelling will be important for engagement in 2017. Similar to presenting your evaluation findings, your social media posts should go beyond recommendations or “the sell” and show the big picture and overall benefits. This is how you create online discussions and avoid the dreaded one-way conversations.

This will be my last post before 2017, so I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. I look forward to see what is in store for 2017! Add your predictions for 2017 in the comments.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

Twitter is a great tool for staying social at conferences. It provides real-time opportunities for sharing content and insights. Here are a few tips to help you be social during your upcoming conferences! You can even use these at Evaluation 2016.

Follow the Conference Hashtag

Most conferences have a hastag which allows you to follow information and news relating to the event. On Twitter, the pound sign (or hash) turns any word that directly follow it into a searchable link. This allows you to organize content and track discussion topics based on keywords. While at a conference, search for the appropriate hashtag (this will most likely be posted at the conference) to see all discussions taking place around the event. From here you can retweet, or even create your own post to stay active in the conversation. At Evaluation 2016, you can use #Eval16.

Retweet Other Users

While attending a conference, retweet posts by other attendees. Retweeting will allow you to spread content to more followers on Twitter and will give you the opportunity to be included in conversations surrounding the event.

Live Tweet a Session

Sharing insights and quotes from presentations and speakers is a great way to help evaluators who couldn’t attend the conference or decided to attend a different session. Live tweeting also helps you build relationships with the speakers. Find the speaker on twitter and add their twitter handle to your post!

Share Photos of your Experience

Photos are a great way to tell a story about your experience at the conference and allow evaluators who were not able to attend an opportunity to visualize the conference. Photos are dominant on Twitter, meaning your photos will be more likely to be retweeted by other attendees, the conference host, and speakers, expanding your exposer to a larger community.

I can’t wait to see what everyone tweets come October at Evaluation 2016! Follow AEA at @aeaweb and use #Eval16 to follow updates and news about the conference.

follow-namss-on-twitter-2

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

With so many different social media platforms to choose from (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram…) it can be hard to identify the platform that works best for your content and the people you are trying to reach with your message. I have outlined a few insights on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest that could help you determine where your content fits in on the social media spectrum.

1471053219_facebook

Hot Tip: Facebook

The most prominent age group on Facebook ranges between 25-34 years of age. This is closely followed by 35-44. Facebook requires unique content which can come in the form of photos, links, or videos. It is often difficult to re-purpose content on Facebook, because of the longevity of a post. However, the benefit to Facebook post longevity is that you do not have to post as often as other platforms, such as Twitter.  Depending on your desired activity, Facebook posts can occur a few times a week versus every day.

1471053228_twitter

Hot Tip: Twitter

Twitter and Facebook are very similar in terms of activity users. Twitter also attracts 25-34 years of age  followed closely by 35-44. The main difference with Twitter, is the life of the post. Twitter is saturated with content, which means your post might only be seen for a limited amount of time before it is pushed to the bottom of a news feed. Due to this short post lifespan, to use Twitter effectively, you need lots of content! Content should be posted to Twitter every day. This content should be a mix of original and shared (retweeted) posts.

Twitter is a great platform for re-purposing your content. Because of a Twitter post’s lifespan, you can repost the same or similar content multiple times to capture the best engagement.

1471053241_linkedin

Hot Tip: LinkedIn

LinkedIn captures a similar age group as Twitter and Facebook, however the active users tend to be more professional and with some type of higher education. LinkedIn is a great place to post content that is relevant to education, career advancement, and research. The active users on LinkedIn are motivated by career goals and professional networking. Content for LinkedIn should be unique similar to Facebook.

1471053254_pinterest

Hot Tip: Pinterest

Pinterest is by far dominated by women. To be successful on this platform you must have an archive of photos or visuals to choose from. Pins that are posted to Pinterest have a long shelf life, due to the active sharing and re-pinning of content. Pinterest is a great tool for sharing your data visualization examples!

I hope this blog provides a better understanding of each platform and helps you decide where to take your content. Use the comments below to share your thoughts.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Jennifer Rosinski and I’m a Senior Marketing Manager at UMass Medical School’s Commonwealth Medicine division. My team uses social media channels (e.g., Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook) to reach global audiences across all social strata. Connecting with audiences through social media can help build your brand, share your expertise, and foster connections.

Social media is a quick, low-cost, high-impact way to spread the word about your organization’s major achievements and accomplishments. Twitter and LinkedIn, in particular, have become go-to places to share the latest research and knowledge in diverse fields from health care to financial management. In the evaluation world, social media can easily be used not only to disseminate project findings, but to share resources, recruit study participants, mobilize populations for community engagement activities, seek input on the development of tools, and much more.

Hot Tips:

  • Post publications you author, including journal articles, technical reports, blogs, and posters. Make sure these are public and the publisher has no restrictions. Our practice transformation expert Joan Johnston shared her poster about optimizing cervical cancer screening.
  • Share media coverage in which your organization is mentioned. This helps spread the message to a wider group. Make sure to mention any partners with whom you’ve worked so they can share it, too. The Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services shared our Tweet about news coverage of the Silver Alert Emergency Response Program partnership.
  • Like and share items posted on LinkedIn that have relevance to your field, or that highlight your work. Our pharmacists liked a post in our LinkedIn group about their conference posters.
  • Talk about awards, appointments or other accolades. Our Clinical Pharmacy Manager Kimberly Lenz shares her excitement in a Tweet about being appointed to a public advisory council.
  • Comment on news others share. One of our autism advocates, Elaine Gabovitch, elaborated on a poster that was posted in our LinkedIn group.
  • Tweet from conferences you attend or host. Here, Warren Ferguson, founder of the Academic & Health Policy Conference on Correctional Health supported by UMass Medical School, shares that a speaker is addressing mental health in criminal justice.

LinkedIn

  1. Connect with your colleagues (past and present), clients, partners
  2. Follow groups – employers, alma maters, interest areas
  3. Keep your profile up-to-date with new accomplishments

Twitter

  1. Learn how to appropriately abbreviate – 140 characters can be challenging; typos are easy!
  2. Use other Twitter handles in your tweets to let others know you are talking about them.
  3. Include relevant hashtags in your tweets. These searchable keywords increase your post’s visibility.

Rad Resources:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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