AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA (May 30).

I am Jean King, professor at the University of Minnesota and, like my colleague John McLaughlin, who collaborated with me on this In Memoriam, an original AEA member. I met Bob Ingle for the first time in New Orleans, LA when I served as the Local Arrangements Chair for the 1988 AEA conference. Bob had charged me with purchasing bottles of liquor for the Conference Chair’s suite—free-flowing alcohol being one of the perquisites of the role at that time—and Associate Conference Chair John McLaughlin delivered the heavy box to its rightful place. Bob let us hire a jazz band for one of the big receptions and even let us serve shrimp. Bob Ingle knew how to put on a conference. He also knew the field of program evaluation because he helped to create it.

Pioneering contributions:

With Bill Gephart, Bob was one of the founders of the Evaluation Network in the early 1970’s, creating a national organization of professionals interested in advancing the practice of program evaluation. With the help of his ever resourceful assistant Nan Blyth, he soon became responsible for planning and managing the Network’s national meetings.

When the Evaluation Network joined with the Evaluation Research Society to become the American Evaluation Association in 1986, Bob became one of its founding members. For AEA’s first ten years, he served as the Annual Conference Chair in a manner that only he could, seemingly enjoying his role as in-house curmudgeon, often with a twinkle in his eye. In his role as Conference Chair, Bob sat on the AEA Board and became a relentless advocate for member services. In recognition of his contributions to the organization, AEA established the Robert Ingle Service Award, presented annually to a member who has provided exceptional service to the organization and been instrumental in promoting its interests and operations.

Enduring contributions:

  1. In the founding years of AEA’s conference, Ingle ensured that one of its signature features would be the opportunity for as many members as possible to showcase their practice, share successes and concerns, and reflect on the future of the field. Bob Ingle was dedicated to sustaining an atmosphere of openness and collegiality.
  2. Bob may have cultivated his gruff image, but he couldn’t mask his kindness. Despite his well-known harrumphing, he genuinely cared about people and wanted the conference to engage as many as possible. Attending one of Ingle’s conference dinners where he held court was an indisputable delight.
  3. Bob worked long hours with us as program chairs ensuring a well-organized conference. The original conference schedule was developed in pencil—with countless erasures—on large sheets of tissue paper. Imagine the increase in productivity when Post-it notes were created.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA on May 30.

My name is Sharon, a former AEA President and editor of the American Journal of Evaluation. Kathy Bolland contributed enormously to the evaluation field generally and AEA specifically. She contributed nearly 30 years of service to AEA in varying capacities. She was the 2015 recipient of the Robert Ingle Service Award posthumously.

Pioneering and enduring contributions:

Bolland

Kathy Bolland

Kathy built and managed EvalTalk, the AEA listserv from 25 initial subscribers in 1995 to over 3,000 today. She served six years as AEA treasurer and on the AEA Executive Committee. She served on the America Journal of Evaluation Editorial Committee. She was Chair of the Social Work AEA Topical Interest Group.

Kathy was the face of AEA for many years before we had professional staff. It‘s likely that more people had interactions with Kathy through EvalTalk, especially in the early years of AEA, than with anyone else. That she was always welcoming, engaging, supportive, ethical, and responsive contributed to both AEA‘s growth in membership and the quality of discourse that has become the hallmark of AEA. Kathy pioneered and nurtured AEA‘s organizational culture of responsiveness and quality.

Kathy was a person whom AEA leadership could call on to help out whenever a task needed to be done thoroughly and in time; she contributed to the smoothness of more than one transition time for the organization; a team player, she offered reasoned and actionable ideas that have shaped AEA.

She was also a dedicated evaluation scholar-practitioner, examining the application of cutting edge ideas to social work and education. One of those cutting edge ideas was program evaluation.

Resources:

Rallis, S.F., & Bolland, K.A. (2004). What is program evaluation? Generating knowledge for improvement. Archival Science, 4(1/2), 5-16.

Atherton, C.R., & Bolland, K.A. (2002). Postmodernism: A dangerous illusion for social work. International Social Work, 45(4), 421-433.

Bolland, K.A., & Atherton, C.R. (2002). Heuristics vs. logical positivism: Solving the wrong problem. Families in Society, 83(1), 7-13.

Bolland, K.A., & Atherton, C.R. (1999). Chaos theory: An alternative approach to social work practice and research. Families in Society, 80(4), 367-373.

Atherton, C.R., & Bolland, K.A. (1997). The multiculturalism-traditionalism debate: A response to Dorothy Van Soest. Journal of Social Work Education, 33(1), 143-150.

Bolland, K.A. (1996). The wisdom of teacher involvement in school-linked social services: Against teacher involvement. Journal for a Just and Caring Education, 2(2), 164-174. (invited).

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA (May 30).

My name is Ernest House and I’ve been writing about social justice and democratic evaluation for four decades. Barry MacDonald was an early colleague, ally, and friend in developing these ideas. He directed the Centre for Applied Research in Education (CARE) at the University of East Anglia in the 1980s and 1990s where he laid a foundation for Democratic Evaluation.

Pioneering and Enduring Contributions:

MacDonald

Barry MacDonald

MacDonald argued that evaluators have a responsibility to inform public dialogue. He saw British governance as closed, elitist, and embedded in social class privilege. Information was power, used mostly against those lower in the hierarchy. The issue was who gets to know what about whom. Evaluation should redress such inequalities. His harshest criticisms were of abuses of power. He had suffered humiliations, and as a working class, Highland Scot, he already had a formidable head start on hostility.

He was widely influential, personally and professionally, especially with those who met him. He studied people and knew their stories. If you know people’s stories, you can be highly persuasive by connecting your story to their story. If your story becomes part of their story, you’ve secured a strong advocate.

The last time I saw Barry, in his smoky lair in Norwich, he asked me to write something about him.

            For Barry,

            Whose friendship, ideas, and democratic ideals have enriched my personal and professional life; whose courage and integrity in the face of political pressures and payoffs have inspired, and whose wit, wordplay, and originality epitomize        style and eloquence. My evaluation novel is a tribute to forty years of our friendship.

                                                                                    Ernie House, 4 October 2010

If he were here now, he might say, “Why are you in this blog? This is about me, not you.” I’d reply, “I’m trying to put a positive spin on your life, and I don’t have that much to work with. I have to bring in material from outside.” He’d chuckle, take a drag from his cigarette, and say, “Maybe so, maybe so.”

I’ve often thought that when someone close to you dies, part of you dies with them, the times together, the conversations. With Barry’s death, many of us lost a sizable chunk. Evaluation lost one of its most brilliant, flamboyant, founding characters.

Resources:

Kushner, S. House, E., Norris, N. & Adelman, C. (2013). In Memoriam: Barry MacDonald (1932–2013). American Journal of Evaluation 34(3): 436-437.

Nigel, N. (2015). Democratic evaluation: The work and ideas of Barry MacDonald. Evaluation, 21(2):135–142.

Barry MacDonald Papers, University of East Anglia. https://www.uea.ac.uk/education/research/care/resources/archive/barry-macdonald

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA (May 30).

My name is Mark W. Lipsey, Director of the Peabody Research Institute at Vanderbilt University. No one such as myself who was around in the 1970s when program evaluation came of age could fail to be aware of Peter Rossi’s contributions to that formative process. However, it was not until the late 1990s that I had the opportunity to work with Peter. Howard Freeman, his longstanding collaborator, died shortly after release of the fifth edition of their seminal textbook, Evaluation: A Systematic Approach. Peter had little appetite for undertaking further editions, but the wily Sage editor, C. Deborah Laughton had other ideas. She hinted to Peter that I might be interested in working with him on a sixth edition, and hinted to me that Peter might be interested in having me do so. These reports were, shall we say, inferences since neither of us had actually said anything like this. But it got us together for what proved to be a fruitful collaboration and many provocative conversations as we coauthored our way through the sixth and seventh editions over the subsequent years.

Pioneering and Enduring Contributions:

Rossi

Peter H. Rossi

Few things shape a new field of study as much as the vision embodied in the early textbooks that give coherence to the themes that have begun to knit themselves together as the fabric of that field. As lead author of one of the first textbooks (Rossi & Williams, 1972), followed by Rossi, Freeman, and Rosenbaum (1979) and the multiple editions thereafter, few individuals equal Peter’s influence on the creation and development of program evaluation as a distinct field. At the same time, he was a practicing evaluation researcher who conducted landmark studies on homelessness, poverty, and criminal justice.

Peter was someone for whom, above all, the facts were primary and, therefore, the proper basis for any contribution of program evaluators to policy or practice. He had little regard for those who used program evaluation to push their own ideologies and values. With respect for the facts came respect for the methods that best elucidate those facts, and Peter was an unstinting champion of using the strongest feasible methods to tackle questions about social programs.

Resources:

Rossi, P. H., Freeman, H. E., & Rosenbaum, S. (1979). Evaluation: A systematic approach. Sage.

Rossi, P. H., Lipsey, M. W., & Freeman, H. E. (2004). Evaluation: A Systematic Approach (7th ed.). Sage.

Rossi, P. H., & Williams, W. (1972). Evaluating social programs: Theory, practice, and politics. Seminar Press.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA (May 30).

My name is Jennifer Greene, a former AEA President and former co-editor of New Directions for Evaluation. Egon Guba, as both a scholar and a person, left an enduring transformative legacy to the field of evaluation. As a scholar, Egon Guba was a brilliant thinker. At a revolutionary moment in the evolution of both social science inquiry and evaluation theory and practice (the 1960s and 1970s), he was among the leaders of the charge for paradigm expansion. Most often in partnership with his wife, Yvonna Lincoln, he toiled tirelessly to champion a constructivist, qualitative approach to understanding human phenomena. As a person, Egon Guba was a gracious and generous man. He offered critically important mentorship to many aspiring evaluators, including me, and was a pivotal influence on my own development as a scholar.

Pioneering and enduring contributions:

Guba

Egon Guba

Egon Guba wrote multiple articles and books, gave innumerable talks, and became one of constructivist, qualitative evaluation’s most eloquent and persuasive spokespersons. His evaluation legacy is significantly deep and wide having contributed to a transformative methodological expansion of the evaluation field, as part of his championship of constructivist thinking and qualitative methodologies. Following on from Bob Stake’s initial advancement of a responsive versus preordinate approach to evaluation and a case study versus experimentalist methodology for evaluation, Egon took up the reins of activist advocacy for these ideas.

Specifically, with Yvonna Lincoln, Egon developed “fourth-generation evaluation” which foregrounded constructivist philosophy and qualitative methodology, but also advanced a bold, politically engaged role for evaluation. Moving beyond the first three generations of evaluation’s role—measurement, description, and judgment—in fourth-generation evaluation, the evaluator surfaces the relevant perspectives, interests, and value claims of diverse stakeholders and helps them negotiate their diverse standpoints toward greater agreement about priorities. Guba and Lincoln explicitly situated evaluation as a values-committed, emancipatory practice, in contrast to most prior evaluation theories, which either claimed value neutrality or value pluralism. This explicit advocacy for particular values in evaluation was a highly significant contribution to the continuing evolution of evaluation theory and practice—perhaps even more significant than Egon’s championship of a constructivist worldview and qualitative methodology.

Resources:

Greene, J.C. (2008). Memories of a novice, learning from a master. American Journal of Evaluation, 29(3):322-324.

Guba, E.G. (1987). What have we learned about naturalistic evaluation? American Journal of Evaluation, 8(1): 23-43.

Guba, E.G. & Lincoln, Y.S. (1989). Fourth generation evaluation. Sage.

Lincoln, Y.S. & Guba, E.G. (1985). Naturalistic inquiry. Sage.

Patton, M.Q., Schwandt, T.A., Stake, R., Stufflebeam, D. (2008). Tributes to Egon Guba,

American Journal of Evaluation, 29(3): 328-329

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA (May 30).

I am Rodney Hopson, Professor of Education Policy and Evaluation at George Mason University and former (2012) President of AEA. Asa G. Hillard III (Baffour Amankwatia II), is one of the evaluation pioneers documented in the Nobody Knows My Name (named after a book by James Baldwin) Project that uncovers the untold contributions of African American educational researchers and evaluators in the United States during the pre-Brown v. Board era. While Hilliard’s major work did not take place pre-Brown, he is a name associated with the Nobody Knows My Name Project and is a name that all evaluators should know.

Trained as an educational psychologist (University of Denver, 1963), Hilliard’s research and practice spanned educational policy, special education, anthropology, child development, and classical African civilizations, Hilliard was one of the first African Americans to provide a keynote at the American Evaluation Association conference (in 1988). Hilliard’s presentation was later published in Evaluation Practice (the precursor to the American Journal of Evaluation) in 1989 and provided ways for evaluators to think differently about data visualization, truth and evidence and the implications for cross-cultural evaluators.   In recent years, the American Evaluation Association has sponsored Think Tank sessions at its annual conference in his honor previously co-sponsored by Indigenous Peoples, MultiEthnic and Social Work Topical Interest Groups to introduce his practice to AEA members and conference goers.

Asa G. Hilliard

Asa G. Hilliard

When names like Ralph Tyler, Robert Ingle, and Marcia Guttentag are remembered, so should those like Reid E. Jackson, Asa Hilliard, and Rose Butler Browne. Their cumulative scholarship and evaluation agenda-setting both laid a foundation for policies, legislation, and counter-narratives that challenged the racial hegemony and institutional segregation that existed in the United States and contributed to the intellectual development of democratic, equitable, and culturally responsive evaluation more generally.

References and Resources:

American Psychological Association. (2016) Featured Psychologist: Asa Hilliard, III, PhD. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/pi/oema/resources/ethnicity-health/psychologists/asa-hilliard.aspx

Hilliard, A. G. (1989). Kemetic (Egyptian) historical revision: Implications for cross-cultural        evaluation and research in education. Evaluation Practice, 10(2), 7–23.

Hood, S. (2001). Nobody knows my name: In praise of African American evaluators who were    responsive. New Directions for Evaluation, 92, 31–43

Hood, S. & Hopson, R.K. (2008). Evaluation roots reconsidered: Asa Hilliard, a Fallen Hero in   the “Nobody Knows My Name” Project, and African Educational Excellence. Review of      Educational Research, 78(3), 410-426.

Hood, S., Hopson, R., and Kirkhart, K. (2015). Culturally Responsive Evaluation: Theory,        practice, and future implications. In Newcomer, K. and Hatry, H (Eds.). Handbook on           Practical Program Evaluation (4th ed.) (pp. 281-317). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is part of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA on May 30.

My name is Mel Mark, a former AEA President and former editor of the American Journal of Evaluation. Don Campbell used pithy phrases to communicate complex philosophical or methodological issues. My favorite was: “Cousin to the amoeba, how can we know for certain?” This encapsulates his philosophy of science which informed his contributions to evaluation.

Pioneering and enduring contributions:

Campbell’s pioneering contributions included work on bias in social perception, intergroup stereotyping, visual illusion, measurement, research design and validity, and evaluation, which was at the center of his vision of “an experimenting society.” He believed in the evolution of knowledge through learning: “In science we are like sailors who must repair a rotting ship while it is afloat at sea. We depend on the relative soundness of all other planks while we replace a particularly weak one. Each of the planks we now depend on we will in turn have to replace. No one of them is a foundation, nor point of certainty, no one of them is incorrigible.”

Donald T. Campbell

Donald T. Campbell

Campbell’s work reminds us that every approach to evaluation is founded in epistemological assumptions and that being explicit about those assumptions, and their implications, is part of our responsibility as evaluators. Campbell wanted science, and evaluation, to keep the goal of truth, testing and inferring what is real in the world. But he acknowledged this goal as unattainable so “we accept a . . . surrogate goal of increasing coherence even if we regard this as merely our best available approximation of the truth.”

Campbell was an intellectual giant but disarmingly modest. He was gracious and helpful to students and colleagues, and equally gracious to his critics. His openness to criticism and self-criticism modeled his vision of a “mutually monitoring, disputatious community of scholars.” Those who knew Don Campbell know with all the certainty allowed to humans just how special he was.

Reference for quotations:

Mark, M. M.(1998). The Philosophy of science (and of life) of Donald T. Campbell,

American Journal of Evaluation, 19, 3: 399-402.

 Resources:

Bickman, L., Cook, T. D., Mark, M.M., Reichardt, C.S., Sechest, L., Shadish, W.R., & Trochim, W.M.K. (1998). Tributes to Donald T. Campbell. American Journal of Evaluation, 19(3): 397-426.

Brewer, M.B. & Collins, B.E. (Eds.) (1981) Scientific inquiry and the social sciences: a volume in honor of Donald T. Campbell. Jossey-Bass.

Campbell, D.T. (1994). Retrospective and prospective on program impact assessment. American Journal of Evaluation, 15 (3): 291-298.

Campbell, D.T. & Russo, J. (2001). Social measurement. Sage.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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This is the beginning of a series remembering and honoring evaluation pioneers leading up to Memorial Day in the USA on May 30.

My name is Sara Miller McCune, Co-founder and Chair of Sage Publications. In 1975, Sage published the 2-volume Handbook of Evaluation Research co-edited by Marcia Guttentag. That Handbook helped establish Evaluation as a distinct field of applied social science scholarship and practice. Marcia conceived the Handbook while serving as president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (1971) and Director of The Center for Evaluation Research affiliated with Harvard University. She was a deeply committed feminist ahead of her times in focusing on gender equity, women’s mental health, reduction of poverty, and intercultural dynamics. As we worked together to finalize the Handbook, I came to appreciate her vivacious personality, wonderful sense of humor, brilliant intellect, and feminist perspective, all of which came into play in conceptualizing the Handbook and seeing it through to publication. Our collaboration on the Handbook led to publishing her breakthrough work on “the sex ratio question” after her untimely death at the age of 45.handbook of evaluation research

Pioneering and Enduring Contributions:

The Handbook articulated methodological appropriateness as the criterion for judging evaluation quality at a time when such a view was both pioneering and controversial. She wrote in the Introduction: “The Handbook provides the type of information that should lead to the consideration of alternative approaches to evaluation and, by virtue of considering these alternatives, to the development of the most appropriate research plan” (p. 4). The Handbook anticipated four decades ago the significance of context and what has become an increasingly important systems perspective in evaluation by devoting four chapters to the conceptual and methodological issues involved in understanding the relationships of individuals, target populations, and programs to “attributes of their environmental context” (p.6). She was surprised, like everyone else at the time, by the huge response to the book, but understood that it foretold the emergence of an important new field. The Handbook introduced a wide readership to evaluation pioneers like Carol Weiss and Donald Campbell. In addition, Marcia Guttentag led the founding of the Evaluation Research Society in 1976, AEA’s predecessor organization. It is altogether appropriate that the AEA Promising New Evaluator Award is named in honor of Marcia Guttentag.

Resources:

Derner, G.F. (1980). Obituary: Marcia Guttentag (1932-1977). American Psychologist, Vol 35(12), 1138-1139.

Guttentag, M., & Secord, P. F. (1983). Too many women?: The sex ratio question. Beverly Hills: Sage Publications.

Marcia Guttentag, Psychology’s Feminist Voices

http://www.feministvoices.com/marcia-guttentag/

Struening, E. L., & Guttentag, M. (1975). Handbook of evaluation research (Vol. 2). Sage Publications.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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AEA365 Curator note: Today, along with the next two Saturdays will be part of a very special  two-week series. 

Pioneer

My name is Michael Quinn Patton of Utilization-Focused Evaluation and former AEA president. In conjunction with Memorial Day in the USA (May 30) I am coordinating and editing two weeks of AEA365 contributions from distinguished evaluation colleagues remembering and honoring select evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to the emergence of our field: Marcia Guttentag by Sara Miller McCune; Donald Campbell by Mel Mark; Asa Hilliard III by Rodney Hopson; Egon Guba by Jennifer Greene; Peter Rossi by Mark Lipsey; Barry MacDonald by Ernie House; Kathy Bolland by Sharon Rallis; Robert Ingle by Jean King; Carol Weiss by Sharon Rallis, Will Shadish by Laura Leviton; Lee Sechrest by Eleanor Chelimsky; and Paul Lazarsfeld, and Alva and Gunnar Myrdal by Charmagne Campbell-Patton.

Pioneering and enduring contributions:

In response to accolades for his scientific breakthroughs, physicist Isaac Newton said in 1676: “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” We do, indeed, stand on the shoulders of evaluation giants and so for the next two weeks we will pause to acknowledge our debt and gratitude to those no longer with us.

We invite you to add to the In Memoriam list. If you wish to recognize someone who has contributed to evaluation, here is the format to follow (in 75 words or less): (1) your name and identifier (2) the name (with birth and death years) and contribution of the person you are remembering; and (3) a resource and/or link to that person’s evaluation contribution, if available.

Send your remembrance by May 31 to: aea365@eval.org

Here is an example:

Remembering and Honoring Brenda Zimmerman

My name is Michael Quinn Patton, author of Developmental Evaluation, and I wish to honor Brenda Zimmerman (1956-2014), my co-author with Frances Westley of Getting to Maybe: How the World Is Changed. Brenda pioneered in translating and applying complexity concepts for social innovators and evaluators of social innovation.

Resource: A Gedenkschrift to honour Brenda Zimmerman. http://www.sigeneration.ca/gedenkschri-honour-brenda-zimmerman/

Remembering and Honoring Our Evaluation Sasha:

As context for this In Memoriam series over the next two weeks, I invite you to consider and contemplate this: Many African cultures distinguish the recent-dead, the sasha, from the long-dead, the zamani. “The recently departed whose time on earth overlapped with people still here are the sasha, the living-dead. They are not wholly dead, for they still live in the memories of the living, who can call them to mind, create their likeness in art, and bring them to life in anecdote. When the last person to know an ancestor dies, that ancestor leaves the sasha for the zamani, the dead. As generalised ancestors, the zamani are not forgotten but revered. But they are not the living-dead. There is a difference.”  — Historian James W. Loewen

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation: Remembering and Honoring Evaluation’s Pioneers. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation pioneers who made enduring contributions to our field. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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My name is Gisele Tchamba and I work for a faith-based organization where I lead in evaluation capacity building. I am also one of the ADAMH TIG leaders.  Today I want to share my experience with the implementation of a new treatment model for behavioral health providers in my county.

The Recovery Oriented Systems of Care Model (ROSC) model is a network of formal and informal services developed and mobilized to sustain long-term recovery for individuals and families impacted by severe substance use and mental health disorders. This model was created to replace the Acute Care model that was not very successful at providing long-term recovery outcomes.

Lesson Learned: The ROSC model is the dream treatment for behavioral health field. However, its implementation has been in process for over 10 years without success. I compared the implementation of the recovery-oriented systems of care model to the Transtheoretical model of behavior change and evaluated my county’s efforts to create its own recovery oriented systems of care model.  This model posits that health behavior change involves progress through six stages of change: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance, and termination. I used this model because of the complex process in the county’s attempt to implement the process. The evaluation revealed that the county was in the second stage of the TTM model (the contemplation stage). But today my county is in the Action stage of the implementation and ready for another evaluation. In reality the ROSC is not a myth, it’s just very difficult to implement.

Hot Tips

  • Each state can create its own ROSC model by forming a task force that can comprise four workgroups (funding, prevention, screening and assessment, and treatment and recovery). These workgroups represent segments of the recovery oriented systems of care model.
  • A successful way to implement the ROSC model in a given community requires commitment from each provider.
  • To facilitate dialogue between providers, there must be funding for liaison. That element is currently missing in my county. I think that must be the reason for the slow progress noted so far.

Lesson Learned: A successful implementation of the recovery oriented systems of care model in this county will lead to the following:

  • Best practice, increase knowledge and facilitate evaluation
  • The county will become a recovery community with sustained long-term recovery outcomes for individuals and families; and
  • There will be better allocation of resources, better community involvement, and honest dialogue among providers.

Rad Resources

The Role of Recovery Support Services in Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care White Paper.

Willam White, an experienced researcher, offers a definition of the ROSC Model.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Alcohol Drug Abuse and Mental Health (ADAMH) TIG Week. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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