Arts, Culture, and Museums TIG Week: Listening/Creating Healthful Narratives: What else can we be? by Shanaé Burch

I am Shanaé Burch, an artist, public health creative, and cultural worker. I believe in the power of storytelling to revive health and reconcile hearts, so I study health justice and equity through the lens of better leveraging arts and culture for wellbeing with contemplative arts-based research methods. This blog begins with a statement of …

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Arts, Culture, and Museums TIG Week: “Culture”: What Is It Good For? by Justin Laing

Justin Laing is the principal of Hillombo LLC, a capital and race critical strategy, research, planning, and evaluation consultancy rooted in Black Studies.

Recently, I’ve been thinking that the justness and criticality of my evaluation or reflection work is related to my consideration of the dominating histories of “culture” in Western Europe and the U.S. I have been persuaded by the argument of Raymond Williams, in “Culture and Society: 1780-1950,” that “culture,” as it is exists today in the name of philanthropic “arts and culture” programs, originated in the 18th and 19th centuries as a strategy of capitalist reform and perpetuation. Worsening matters, Williams’ case for “culture as reform” connects well with Dylan Rodriguez’s argument that reform is a strategy of counterinsurgency.

Arts, Culture, and Museums TIG Week: Linguistic Inclusivity: Navigating Language Justice in Creative Spaces by Eva Chavez

¡Hola/Hello! My Name is Eva Maria Chavez (Eva, as in “4-eh-vah-eh-vah”), and I am a community-based evaluator and organizer who, until recently, worked at The Music Center of Los Angeles (TMC). TMC provides cultural events for the diverse community of Los Angeles County. My role was to operationalize the theory of change across the organization …

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Arts, Culture, and Museums TIG Week: Trees of Knowledge & Trees of Life: Modernist Discourses of Art and Evaluation by Vidhya Shanker

Greetings from Vidhya Shanker, convener of The May 13 Group. Art history taught me to ask why makers choose some forms and not others. In his video echoing the idea that Nicky Bowman, Jara Dean-Coffey, and myself have shared—to use a forest ecosystem instead of a single tree as a metaphor for the knowledge economy …

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Arts, Culture, and Museums TIG Week: Enhancing Vaccine Confidence in a Culturally Responsive Way by Brianna Smith and Myrline Newton

Hi there! We’re Myrline Newton and Brianna Smith–Program Managers of Equitable Vaccines! Myrline here, I am typically the one “on the ground,” facilitating events. Brianna here, I typically handle “behind the scenes” tasks like developing program resources and also serve as one of the program evaluators. Program Snapshot Equitable Vaccines is a collaborative initiative between …

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University-Based Centers TIG Week: The Realities of Real-World Evaluation Work in the South: Navigating the Complexities of Evaluation Guiding Principles within a Large University System in the South by Bich Do and Samuel B. Robison

We are Bich Do, Research Associate, and Sam Robison, Associate Director and Associate Professor of Research of the Louisiana State University Social Research and Evaluation Center. In this post, we discuss the challenges of evaluation work in a large university system situated in the Deep South, shedding light on the unique challenges and solutions we’ve encountered while striving to align with the AEA Guiding Principles.

University-Based Centers TIG Week: Working with Students at a University-Based Evaluation and Research Center by Rae Jing Han, Liz Litzler, Erin Carll, Emily Knaphus-Soran, and Daniel Mackin Freeman

Hi! We are Rae Jing Han, Liz Litzler, Erin Carll, Emily Knaphus-Soran, and Daniel Mackin Freeman from the University of Washington Center for Evaluation & Research for STEM Equity. Our center usually employs 6-10 students (graduate and undergraduate) to help us with our evaluation and research projects. We love the energy and perspective students bring, and over time, we have learned a few things about the strengths students bring to our work and some strategies for supporting them in their role.  We have incorporated student voices in quotes.

University-Based Centers TIG Week: The Benefits of Working at a University-Based Evaluation Center by Shannon Sharp

Hi AEA members! My name is Shannon Sharp, and I am an Evaluation Associate at the University of Mississippi’s Center for Research Evaluation (CERE). I have worked at this University-Based Evaluation center (UBC) for seven years, and in that time, I have come to realize that there are benefits—both professional and personal—to working within a university system that are often not available when working in other sectors.

University-Based Centers TIG Week: University-Based Partnership and Evaluative Capacity-Building by Olivia Melvin, Gray Flora, and Yasmin McLaurin

Hey all! We are Olivia Melvin, Gray Flora, and Yasmin McLaurin. This blog is written from the perspective of an evaluator-client dyad of a student success program served by a University-Based Evaluation Center at the University of Mississippi. This year-long evaluative capacity building partnership formed in early-stage program development. The content for this blog post was generated via unstructured reflective interview.