AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Data Visualization and Reporting

I’m Kylie Hutchinson (a.k.a. @EvaluationMaven), independent evaluation consultant and trainer with Community Solutions Planning & Evaluation and author of Survive and Thrive: Three Steps to Enhancing Your Program Sustainability.

The word I chose to memorialize this week is a small but important one. It’s the letter “a”, as in “She asked for a final evaluation report”.

As evaluators, many of us are accustomed to providing a single (and lengthy) final report at the end of the evaluation. However, change is in the air, and many of us would also like to see the demise of the final report because it often goes unread by busy decision makers and sits on a shelf collecting dust. But a two-page briefing note doesn’t work in all situations either. Clearly, one type of report does not fit all, which is where the concept of layering comes in.

Hot Tip: Layering is a term I coined in 2008 to describe the simultaneous use of diverse report formats to communicate your evaluation results. The purpose of layering is to give different stakeholders the option to go as shallow or as deep as they choose into your evaluation findings. It works like this. Imagine a lengthy report as the meat of a burger; it can be very heavy and take a long time to digest. Final reports are often very dense documents, and not all stakeholders have the time nor appetite to eat them. Sometimes, all they want is lettuce with a bit of tomato (e.g. a newsletter), or a slice of cheese (e.g. a podcast). Or they may be rushed and can only take a quick nibble of the bun (e.g. an infographic). Some of these users will be intrigued enough to eat the whole burger, appendices and all, while others might be satisfied with just a few bites. Layering works because each communication product contains the same key messages and is linked to a more detailed option, enticing the reader to learn more if they choose. By employing diverse communication strategies for these varying appetites, you give intended users the choice of how deeply they wish to delve into the results.

Rad Resource: A Short Primer on Effective Evaluation Reporting. In this upcoming book, I talk more about the concept of layering and present different ideas for communicating results beyond the traditional lengthy report.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation concepts, terms, or approaches. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hey everyone! I’m Echo Rivera, owner of Creative Research Communications and research associate at Center for Policy Research. My passion is helping evaluators bring creativity to the research communication process. Today I want to talk about your presentation design workflow.

Let me ask you something: does the process of making a presentation stress you out? Do you find you’re always scrambling last minute to finish a presentation on time?

Yeah, I’ve been there. When we have to make several presentations throughout the year, they can add up to a lot of wasted time when done inefficiently.

One part of your workflow might be the biggest problem: Adding visuals.

Does your workflow look something like this?

  1. You’re working on your presentation,
  2. You look at your slide and think “is there an image for that?”,
  3. You search and search and search online until you find the right one,
  4. Then you add it to your presentation, aaaand
  5. Repeat

Am I close? Or did I miss the step where you get lost in the rabbit hole of news articles, blogs or YouTube?

This simple act of looking for one image at a time is extremely inefficient. When you’re in SPSS crunching numbers, do you suddenly stop and start searching for articles for your lit review, then come back later to finish and print your output?

That would be super inefficient, right? The same idea applies to presentations.

Hot Tip:

You will be most efficient if you approach each presentation activity as a separate, standalone task.

SUGGESTED STEPS TO AN EFFICIENT PRESENTATION DESIGN WORKFLOW:

[1] Set Presentation Goals & Figure Out Your Story

  1.  Think through who the audience is and what will resonate with them the most.
  2. Decide on 1-3 key point(s) to make in the presentation.
  3. Brainstorm a “storyboard” that funnels into the key point(s)

[2] Draft Your Presenter Notes

  1. Following your storyboard, draft what you want to say on the slides
  2. Do a quick run-through, speaking aloud all of the notes, making adjustments to the order/organization, filling in any gaps, and removing “fluff.”
  3. Do another run-through to assess time. Add/remove content as necessary. Try to finalize content as much as possible.

[3] Design the Slides

  1. Copy & paste text from your slides into the presenter notes, adding back in only a few words onto the slide, and no more than 3 points per slide.
  2. Add high quality visuals on as many slides as possible, reducing excess text as you go along.
  3. Use design elements to make the remaining text effective (e.g., minimum font size 30).
  4. If necessary, add simple animations (e.g., appear)  to walk the audience through the content.
  5. Conduct a self-check on the overall presentation to ensure all content is readable & visually appealing.

Rad Resource: Step 3b should not take very long. The trick is to have a Visual Database ready to go. I created a free 6-day email course that shows you how to create one. Check it out!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hello all! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with a Hot Tip and Rad Resource for presentation designers!

On March 30, we unveiled a new, reorganized and freshened up Potent Presentations Initiative (p2i) website. Here’s what you’ll find:

  1. On the p2i HOME page, you’ll find a brief introduction to p2i, and our 3 key components – Message, Design, and Delivery. Webinars for each provide in-depth learning and reference some of the resources found on the PRESENTATION TOOLS & GUIDELINES page.
  2. All downloadable resources live on the PRESENTATION TOOLS & GUIDELINES page. The page is organized with Checklists & Worksheets on top, then resources aligned to the p2i components – Message, Design, and Delivery – followed by resources for Audience Engagement. As you browse this page, you’ll find links to additional content and pages along with the tools. Just look for tool titles that are links, as in this example: Notice that “Slide Design Guidelines” is a link. This will take you to another page of content on Slide Design. Another key addition is that the authors who contributed the content are now recognized and their names linked to their websites or LinkedIn profiles.
  3. Given that posters are the largest category of presentations at our annual conference, POSTER PRESENTATIONS warranted its own page. Here, you’ll find a page with specific guidelines for designing a conference poster, along with two additional navigation buttons. One takes you to more content on Research Poster Design, while the other points to  Award Winning Posters,  from recent AEA conferences, and other organizations. Each poster image is accompanied by a brief explanation of what makes it a winner.
  4. Don’t forget to visit the ABOUT US page to learn about the folks who have contributed to making p2i what it is!
  5. We now have a hashtag that is all ours: #aeap2i. Please tweet about the p2i website and resources using this tag. Follow the hashtag #aeap2i by clicking on the top button found on the p2i HOME page, and while you’re at it, why not follow the association itself (@aeaweb) as well! 

Behind the scenes…

Over the last year, we’ve worked to migrate and reorganize all content from the original p2i website to the main AEA site at eval.org (kudos to Zachary Grays, who did the heavy lifting!). We updated the tools, and added new content and introductory language where needed. One reason for the move was to protect us from hackers. Our original site, built on a different platform, was a constant target and over the years we received countless notices from members that the site URL had been maliciously redirected (meaning it took people to a different website), or that downloads were not working. We’re confident now the new site and all of our great content will be safe and reliable.

Be sure to visit eval.org/p2i and let us know what you think!

Sneak Preview! We have exciting new content for our p2i resource collection on its way to publication. Stay tuned to learn more!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, my name is Deven Wisner, the Manager of Human Capital & Business Analytics at Global Registration Services, Inc. By night, I am an independent evaluator and blogger — more on that here!

Word Clouds. Let’s talk about them. Specifically, when are they appropriate to use? And more importantly, when shouldn’t they be used.

If you’re like a lot people, word/tag clouds are a tool you use to visualize qualitative data. You put a bunch of data in and out pops a beautiful (okay, only sometimes) arrangement of words. If you are a dataviz nerd, you might be comforted by looking at something other than a qualitative results table. Even if you haven’t entitled yourself a dataviz machine, you might think your word cloud is quite eye-catching. And guess what? You’re probably right.

So, what’s the problem? Glad you asked. Word clouds may appear to be the “sexy” version of a table full of themes, definitions, frequencies, and examples, but they can also be extremely misleading. Also, when is the last time you saw a word cloud with all those important details listed? As Robert Hein from VisionCritical wrote about word clouds, “Size isn’t everything…” (2011).

More? Okay, here are some key issues with word clouds:

  • Readers use the size of a word to determine its importance
  • Visuals are often clouded (pun definitely intended) with prepositions
  • Interpretations are left entirely up to the reader

Therefore, as data driven decision makers who have a responsibility to disseminate information that is easy to digest, let’s stop using word clouds as the easy way out of not knowing what to do with our qualitative data!

Instead, how about we try to…

  • Avoid being lazy and list some great examples with some color to call out important pieces of the excerpt (again, no one cares about prepositions!)
  • Incorporate icons and color in your coding process (as great as black text on a white background is, let’s be a little more creative),
  • Add a photo to compliment a quote.

Still determined to get some word cloud action into your report? Fine. If you insist. Let’s agree to only use word clouds when…

  • You need a content specific decoration (because at the end of the day, that’s what they are).
  • You can’t form themes or trends.
  • Interpretation does not matter (data is purely exploratory).
  • You need help identifying themes (sometimes seeing word counts can help, but be careful about the bias involved with this).

So, what did we learn? Word clouds have their uses, but it is important to use the right visualization tool for the data that needs to be displayed. The resources below provide fresh ideas for visualizing qualitative data and help to identify which tool to use when.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Elissa Schloesser with Visual Voice, I am a freelance graphic designer specializing in infographics, data visualization and reporting. I enjoy making complex information more understandable and engaging. I have partnered with several evaluators to help visually communicate evaluation methods and findings.

Below are a few techniques I use to make logic models, theory of change and other process diagrams more visually appealing and digestible.

Hot Tip: Start by considering your diagram’s purpose and audience. Edit content accordingly.

Is your diagram intended to be analyzed up close by your reader, or is it intendd to provide a visual overview of your model or process? If its purpose is to be used as a summary, only include the most important and relevant information.

Hot Tip: Establish a hierarchy of information and apply a consistent design style to each level.

Not all information should get equal visual weight and real estate. The main concepts and connections should be the biggest and boldest, while the supporting details should be formatted to be smaller and lighter. Establish a design style for each level of information and make sure it is applied consistently throughout. This is especially important when you are working with a diagram that has lots of layers of information.

Hot Tip: Use color to enhance your diagram, not make the diagram.

I like to think of color as a bonus feature in any diagram. Selective color use can help emphasize connections in your diagram (but try not to get carried away). If you use every color in the rainbow, it tends to be less effective. Additionally, I like to test to see if my diagram is still understandable in grayscale even if it will most likely be viewed in color. If the diagram is not understandable without the color, go back and readjust the line weight, headings or iconography.

Rad Resource: Below is a sample process diagram to help illustrate the points above. It is similar in structure to what you might use for a logic model. This diagram could be recreated in Word or PowerPoint in a table with invisible borders.

Rad Resource: For more advice on how to make your diagrams more digestible, check out this blog post by Grank Denneman – “10 guidelines for creating good looking diagrams”.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello good people! My name is Robert Perez and I am a research assistant at Hamai Consulting and data analyst at Youth Policy Institute. I am responsible for cleaning and analyzing data from various sources and designing engaging ways to communicate findings using reports, dashboards, and infographics.

I spend some time at the beginning of the year planning out projects for my department using a number of different tools. One tool I love to use is the gantt chart. I searched for a way to automate the conditional formatting process of coloring each of the representative time units and stumbled upon a template from Chandoo.org.

(click for larger image)

This particular gantt chart allows the user to enter the starting week, project duration, and completion status, which will automatically populate the lines with colors depending on the department or project name. Formatting this chart took some “Excelbow” grease as the original chart did not have the option to colorize the tasks based on the department or project.

Updating tools like this gantt chart regularly will encourage its use and keep it from being lost in virtual oblivion. Keep in mind the technical skill of your audience and communicate with them during the design process to ensure that what you are creating will be of use to them.

Hot Tip: If you are having trouble understanding the function of a formula, I find it helpful to break out the formula into its component parts and paste each component into their own cells. This way, I can determine the return value of each nested formula, which gives me more context around how each component works together.

Hot Tip: No matter how often you design a visualization or a tool, the question of “who is your audience” will always come up.  Harvard Business Review offers some definitions of audience categories that might help with your design process:

Novice: first exposure to the subject; doesn’t want oversimplification

Generalist: aware of the topic, but looking for an overview understanding and major themes

Managerial: in-depth, actionable understanding of intricacies and interrelationships with access to detail

Expert: more exploration and discovery and less storytelling with great detail

Executive: only has time to glean the significance and conclusions of weighted probabilities

Rad Resource: Sometimes I need a bit of inspiration when designing my visuals. Fortunately, there is a veritable bevy of resources online from which we can fuel our creative engines. One of my favorite sites to visit is Contextures.com. The site caters to Excel novices, offering lessons about conditional formatting to VLOOKUPs, and those more experienced learners with lessons about automation using VBA. Of course, there is also Chandoo.org, a site that has one of the friendliest community forums ever.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

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Hello! I’m Julie Lamping, a research analyst at Harper College in Illinois. A lot of what I do is extracting data that is needed, formatting it into tables or charts, and providing a basic analysis to be used during decision making at the College. No matter the project, everything gets thrown into Excel at some point.

I absolutely love pivot tables and charts! I use them for simple validation, creating crosstabs and charts, and building dashboards. Excel has its limitations (*cough*itdieswhenthereistoomuchdata*cough*), so pivots aren’t miracles for everyone (just maybe for some of you).

Start with [fairly] clean data in Excel. Go to the INSERT tab and select PivotTable. Boom, now you have a pivot table (seriously, that’s it). Like everything Excel spits out at first, it is ugly. PivotTable Tools tab will help you design the table to look however you want. You can even group items together. LifeProTip: have your color palette ready by creating a custom style theme in Microsoft.

We’re data visualization people, so if you go back to your sheet with your data, Insert a PivotChart the same way you would a table (hint, it’s usually located by the other charts under the INSERT tab).
Format that bad boy with all the data visualization standards and skills you have. It looks so good (probably).

But say youwant to give someone else the option to filter the chart how they want – we can do that! While the PivotChart is selected, head on over to the ANALYZE tab and hit “Insert Slicer”. Select the fields from your PivotTable you want and click OK. LifeProTip: I use this function when creating dashboards in Excel.

Any selection on the slicer will filter your PivotTable and PivotChart. Hint, these slicers can also be customized to be appealing – I usually make mine gray but Harper’s blue when selected.

Extra fun dashboarding – you can move your PivotTables and Charts using the Move Chart function. If I’m creating a dashboard in Excel, I move my final Charts and Slicers over to new sheet (usually renamed DASH for my sanity) and hide the rest of my mess.

TL;DR: Select the first cell in your excel table and insert a PivotTable or PivotChart. Format and modify as needed. Insert Slicers if you are always extra like I am, then move to a separate sheet for quick dashboard.

Happy Excel’ing!

Rad Resources:

For newbies to Pivots in Excel: Ann Emery’s Introduction to Pivot Tables

Jon covers finalizing the dashboard: Youtube Video on Excel Dashboarding by Jon from Excel Campus

All things dashboard’ing in Excel: SmartSheet’s Post on Excel Dashboards

Shameless plug: My [sassy] tutorial

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Greetings from Minneapolis, Minnesota! I am Angie Ficek, a Program Evaluator at Professional Data Analysts (PDA), an independent consulting firm specializing in evaluating public health programs. We wanted to share three data viz related features in Office 2016 that are easy and helpful for spiffing up evaluation reports and presentations.

Cool Tricks:

1. Icons: Icons are a fantastic way to communicate ideas without words, and there are some wonderful websites out there from which to download icons. But, did you know that Office 2016 has its own icons? Simply go to the Insert tab, and you will find the Icons option between Shapes and SmartArt.

The downside is that there are far fewer options than, say, Noun Project, but the great part is that you can easily change the color of the icon (to any color!). Just click on the icon, go to the Format tab, and select a color from the Graphics Fill menu. Hats off to you, Microsoft!

2. Maps: You may have noticed that Office 2016 has some new chart types, one of which is a Map chart. My colleague showed me just how easy it is to create a map with this feature. She had a column of county names and a column of numbers, and simply by clicking Insert > Map, a map of that state was produced and the data was mapped and scaled accordingly. See an example of a default map below with some sample data.

You can plot country/region, state/province, county, or postal code, on these maps but not cities or street addresses. The color scale can be a sequential 2-color scale (as shown) or a diverging 3-color scale. To create the map, Microsoft sends your data to Bing Maps, which may or may not be an issue if you are mapping sensitive data.

3. Merge shapes: I recently stumbled across the Merge Shapes command in PowerPoint, which might not be a new feature, but it was new to me. I learned that it can do some fun things when merging a picture with words for added impact. Check it out:

To access the Merge Shapes command, select at least two shapes, images, or text boxes that you want to merge. From the Drawing Tools tab, select the Merge Shapes drop-down menu and choose one of the five commands shown below.

For a description of each Merge Shape command, see this Indezine article.

We are excited to keep exploring Office 2016 to see what other new features or not-yet-discovered features it has!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi! I’m Kate Diaz, Senior Manager for Corporate Measurement, TechnoServe. When working with data visualizations, it can sometimes be difficult to craft the message that drives home the key insight for your audience. That was an issue we faced as we began to plan for our 2016 Impact Report, which uses data visualizations to help readers understand key aspects of TechnoServe’s impact. Thanks in no small part to the  expert guidance from AEA’s Ann Emery, however, we finished with a report that makes a strong, clear argument for our impact.

Lesson Learned: While creating the report’s data visualizations, I learned how much the revisions process helps refine and isolate the message. When drafting a visualization, I often start out with three or four insights from the data that I want to convey to readers. Through revisions, by sharing the visualization with others, and putting it aside and coming back to it, I hone in on the exact message that drives the report’s narrative. The revisions process helps identify the message just as much as it helps identify the right visual.

Revisions included sketches on pen and paper, the app Paper54, Excel, and photos taken during Skype calls (Thanks again, Ann!)

For example, a key visualization in the 2016 Impact Report illustrates how we assess Financial Benefits, a measure of increased revenue and wages. Early iterations, shown above left, explored the idea of impact flows over time. But we were really interested in talking about 2016 impact, not a trendline. We tried a waterfall chart, which showed the composition of the whole but still accentuated a chronology. Doing away with a timeline, we tried stacked bar charts. These ultimately helped us identify the key insight for readers: that this year’s impact is a result of work we’re doing this year and the sustained impact from prior years. A few iterations later, our message was clear:

The finished product.

After so much effort, it can be hard to let go of the other hard-won insights about our impact in order to isolate the one that best fits the narrative. I’m often tempted to try to convey three or four different insights in one graph. But the result is a busy, messy visualization that is unsuccessful at driving any message home. TechnoServe’s annual impact report is a printed document, so space is limited, but online or presentation versions are more flexible. They are an opportunity to explore the insights that didn’t make it into the printed report.

Data visualization is certainly about the destination: it’s important to land on the graph that clearly conveys the intended message. But the journey, the revisions process, will ensure you get there. Happy graphing!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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I’m Giovanni Dazzo, co-chair of the Democracy & Governance TIG and an evaluator with the Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL). I’m going to share how we collaborated with our grantees to develop a set of common measures—around policy advocacy, training and service delivery outcomes—that would be meaningful to them, as program implementers, and DRL, as the donor.

During an annual meeting with about 80 of our grantees, we wanted to learn what they were interested in measuring, so we hosted an interactive session using the graffiti-carousel strategy highlighted in King and Stevahn’s Interactive Evaluation Practice. First, we asked grantees to form groups based on program themes. After, each group was handed a flipchart sheet listing one measure, and they had a few minutes to judge the value and utility of it. This was repeated until each group posted thoughts on eight measures. In the end, this rapid feedback session generated hundreds of pieces of data.

Hot Tips:

  • Add data layers. Groups were given different colored post-it notes, representing program themes. Through this color-coding, we were able to note the types of comments from each group.
  • Involve grantees in qualitative coding. After the graffiti-carousel, grantees coded data by grouping post-its and making notes. This allowed us to better understand their priorities, before we coded data in the office.
  • Create ‘digital flipcharts’. Each post-it note became one cell in Excel. These digital flipcharts were then coded by content (text) and program theme (color). Here’s a handy Excel macro to compute data by color.

  • Data visualization encourages dialogue. We created Sankey diagrams using Google Charts, and shared these during feedback sessions. The diagrams illustrated where comments originated (program theme / color) and where they led (issue with indicator / text).

Lessons Learned:

  • Ground evaluation in program principles. Democracy and human rights organizations value inclusion, dialogue and deliberation, and these criteria are the underpinnings of House and Howe’s work on deliberative democratic evaluation. We’ve found it helpful to ground our evaluation processes in the principles that shape DRL’s programs.
  • Time for mutual learning. It’s been helpful to learn more about grantees’ evaluation expectations and to share our information needs as the donor. After our graffiti-carousel session, this entire process took five months, consisting of several feedback sessions. During this time, we assured grantees that these measures were just one tool and we discussed other useful methods. While regular communication created buy-in, we’re also testing these measures over the next year to allow for sufficient feedback.
  • And last… don’t forget the tape. Before packing your flipchart sheets, tape the post-it notes. You’ll keep more of your data that way.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Democracy & Governance TIG Week with our colleagues in the Democracy & Governance Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our DG TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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