AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Data Visualization and Reporting

Hello! We are Carolyn Camman, Christopher Cook, Andrew Leyland, Suzie O’Shea, and Angela Towle of the UBC Learning Exchange, which is a little bit of the University of British Columbia in the heart of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES). It’s a bridge for mutual understanding and learning between the University and a neighbourhood rich in community, art, and history, but whose residents face challenges, including homelessness, poverty, gentrification, and stigma. The UBC Learning Exchange acts as a member of the community, giving back to residents through community-based programming alongside experiential learning opportunities for students and support for community-based research.

The Learning Lab supports members of the DTES community to engage in activities and scale-up their involvement by offering creative and educational activities in a flexible, low barrier format. In keeping with the arts-based principles of the Learning Lab and community engagement mission of the Learning Exchange, when it came time to make the results of a recent evaluation accessible to a community audience, the answer was obvious: put on a show!

Voices UP! is a theatrical performance co-written and co-performed with the community members who contributed to the original evaluation. It not only communicated evaluation results, but deepened the evaluation itself. Through writing and performing the play, the cast learned more about evaluation and shared new stories and insights. Over its four-performance run from Spring 2016 to Fall 2017, the show evolved and grew.

Hot Tip: There’s growing interest in using arts-based methods in evaluation. Live theatre is a dynamic and engaging approach that encourages people to connect with findings viscerally and immediately as part of a dialogue between performers and audience. In post-performance talk-back, one person said, “It was neat to hear the participants reflecting on what they had just done as well as what it meant to them to be a part of it.” Another commented that “seeing” the impact of the program was more persuasive than reading about it from a report or grant application.

Lessons Learned: A performance doesn’t have to be polished or “professional” to be effective. Community members speaking in their own words is powerful and there are many creative techniques (like puppets!) that can bring evaluation findings to life. Having a conversation with the cast and giving introductions to audiences before performances about different ways theatre can “look” helped set appropriate expectations.

Rad Resources: To keep Voices UP! going even after the curtains come down for the last time, the Learning Exchange staff and cast of program patrons came together to tell their story one last time, this time in a comic book. You can download this resource online for free: http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/voicesupcomic It was created using the same participatory process as the original performance and tells the story of how Voices UP! came to be, with tips and insights for anyone interested in using theatre methods to tell their evaluation story. Look up “reader’s theatre” and “ethnodrama” for more ideas about turning evaluation and research into plays.

The cast and creators of Voices UP! Photo credit: The UBC Learning Exchange

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings! I’m Rose Hennessy, Adjunct Professor in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and a Doctoral Student at the Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, both at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In teaching Program Evaluation to MSW students, I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to collaborate with Jennifer Grove and Mo Lewis at the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC).

In the short duration of a semester, it can be difficult to provide students the opportunity to practice engaging with stakeholders and translate evaluation findings. In conjunction with NSVRC staff, we proactively identified recent research articles of interest for sexual violence prevention practitioners. Busy professionals frequently do not have time or access to recent publications, but in academia we can play a role in getting current research out in digestible ways! Students are assigned articles and asked to create infographics of key themes and implications to meet stakeholder needs.

Lessons Learned:

  • Students learn a new technology best with hands-on learning. A free infographic program is taught to the class in a computer lab where they can learn and practice. Walking through skills step-by-step with a guided handout promotes a new skill and program.
  • Assignment scaffolding models the stakeholder process. Four different assignments are used for the project, allowing for feedback, revisions, and reflection. Students review the NSVRC website for content, design, and values. They critique their article to pull content specific to the stakeholder, create and present the infographic, and use class feedback to reflect and create revisions.
  • Presenting infographics allows for shared learning of evaluation concepts. Students review creative ways to share qualitative and quantitative findings, examine different study designs, discuss how to present null findings, explore various visualization options, and gain experience utilizing critical feedback from peers.
  • More time is needed to promote culturally responsive evaluation. Research with diverse populations was intentionally chosen for review, but many students lack prior experience translating findings across cultures. Providing readings to assist students, setting up ground rules, and allowing more time for reflection and discussion is necessary to help students process evaluation results in a culturally-responsive manner. Conversations also highlighted the need to differentiate between collaborative approaches and culturally-responsive evaluation, and new readings have been identified for future courses.

As an instructor, a collaborative project with NSVRC provides students the opportunity for learning with real-world applications. There was high motivation for the creation of projects that can be used by a national leader in the field, and students leave the class with new skills in the translation of research, study design, visualization, and dissemination!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Week with our colleagues in the Wisconsin statewide AEA Affiliate. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello, AEA365 readers! We are Antonina Rishko-Porcescu (Ukraine), Khalil Bitar (Palestine/Germany) and Bianca Montrosse-Moorhead (USA), from EvalYouth, a global, multi-stakeholders partnership which promotes young and emerging evaluators to become future leaders in evaluation.  Antonina is leader of an EvalYouth task force; Khalil is Vice-Chair of EvalYouth and Bianca is Co-Chair of the network.  We are excited to share what we have learned from EvalYouth’s use of visualization when communicating with our young audiences of evaluators.

We communicate a lot with a broad range of evaluators, especially young and emerging evaluators, and young people from around the world.  In this ever changing fast-paced world, we understand that using words is not enough.  Information must be clear, direct, coherent, and compelling.  One question we have explored is: how should we disseminate information and evidence in a way that draws novice evaluators in, and presents information in a meaningful way?

Examples:

  • Summarizing data collected through an international survey with young and emerging evaluators (e.g., here and here).
  • Summarizing results of received applications for the first EvalYouth International Mentoring Program (e.g., here).
  • Transforming the Network’s original logo to highlight special events and programs (e.g., here and here)

Hot Tips and Cool Tricks:

  • Visualization makes complex data easier to understand, but it is not easy to create good visualizations; it involves hard work and research. Do your homework.
  • Try to strike a balance between pictures and words. An infographic should include valuable information, not just cool graphics, but that too.
  • Use colorful designs and, when appropriate, humor. Doing so invites readers, especially youth and young and emerging evaluators, to read information.
  • Work collaboratively. Others bring fresh perspectives and new ideas, but also often feel more of an ownership of the project you are working on after it concludes.  Ownership often means that there is an excellent possibility they will share it with relevant contacts and on their social media channels afterward.
  • It is not enough to make a great infographic and stop there. Disseminate such work widely through mailing lists and social media outlets. There people will see your message and, very importantly, engage with it.

Lesson Learned:

  • Data visualization used well is a powerful communication tool. It can simplify complex ideas and big data in just a few items on an infographic.
  • Working with a team of people from many backgrounds or countries, helps a lot. What might be right, appropriate and trendy in one region or culture, could be the opposite in another.  Diverse team perspectives can identify and overcome such issues.
  • The ethics of data visualization is also important to consider. A well-done data visualization is a powerful tool! As Uncle Ben in the Spider-Man series said, “with great power comes great responsibility.”  Care should be taken to ensure that the visualization message is accurate, valid, coherent, and just.

Want to learn more about EvalYouth? Follow EvalYouth on social media: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Or, write to us: evalyouth@gmail.com.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings everyone! Corey Newhouse here, Founder and Principal of Public Profit – a consulting firm helping mission-driven organizations measure and manage what matters. Have you ever toiled for hours on a data-heavy report, only to hear back from a client that it doesn’t look or feel quite right? Maybe they missed your point entirely?

As evaluators, we put a great deal of thought into how we present our findings in order to convey the right message. There is plenty of research to show that a well-formatted report increases comprehension and retention. But sometimes those old-school clients of ours get a little prickly about these updated formatting styles, and spend more time critiquing the layout than paying attention to the content. For exactly those situations, Public Profit has developed a short document to share with clients that outlines why our reports look the way they do.

Lessons Learned:

  • Show, don’t tell. It is easy (and wishful) to think you can tell a client why you did something, and they’ll just accept it. Trust me, it is much easier to just show them why. That’s where our formatting style guide comes in handy. It outlines our rationale behind things like margins, layout, font sizing, and use of color amongst others. This shows the client why our format style works well, all in a quick two-page document.
  • Show them before, not after. When possible, we show the formatting style guide to our clients early in the reporting phase. When the client receives the report, they will be more focused on the information, not the “funky” formatting.
  • Start a conversation. Clients sometimes have valid reasons (or at least strong feelings) for why they might prefer a different format. Having a short conversation early in the process often saves us from spending unnecessary time re-formatting documents at the last minute.

Rad Resources:

  • Download Public Profit’s short formatting style guide that we share with clients.
  • Stephanie Evergreen has a handy checklist to help you score your report layout.
  • Ann K. Emery has lots of great strategies on how to design and display information effectively.
  • Chris Lysy’s Creativity School offers short online course aimed at helping boost your creativity and leverage digital tools to better display information.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings!  My name is Jennifer Lyons, MSW from Lyons Visualization, LLC.  I am a social worker, data designer, and speaker.  In my independent consulting business, I bring creative energy to making data intriguing and impactful, while helping clients transform the way they communicate their story. Today I want to talk about a method I like to use that is effective in both engaging clients in the interpretation of data, while also setting the stage for an impactful visual summary of findings.

In this post, I am going to focus on a process to use after data is collected and analyzed.  After analysis, it is time to dive in and highlight the story within the data.  Part of storytelling with data is making meaning of the information in context. Our clients are the experts on the delivery of their programs, people they work with, and the reporting context.  It is important to include our clients in thoughtful interpretation of their data.  In this post, I am going to focus on using a worksheet to guide a data interpretation meeting and transform findings into a visual summary.

Hot tip: Start by designing the data interpretation worksheet.  This worksheet is the backbone to a visual executive summary of your findings. Below is an example of a simple data interpretation worksheet made for an evaluation of an after-school reading program.  Included are graphic displays of the data with blank boxes that give space for clients to add their interpterion. During the data interpretation meeting, you can use this worksheet to partner with clients to highlight and frame central findings in the data.

Hot Tip: Paste each graph from the worksheet on an empty slide and ask your clients to examine each data point.  Prompt them with questions about what they see as positive, negative, and surprising about the findings.  It is also important to ask your clients to think of relevant context.  As a group, process everyone’s recommendations and thoughts.  There are often a lot of important things being shown in one graph, but together, you can decide on what is most important.  Then, write the most important takeaway/s from the graph in the graph title.  This process is repeated for each graph.  By the end, you will have something like this:

Hot Tip: This completed worksheet can easily be transformed into a visual summary of your findings.  For this worksheet to transition to a visual executive summary, there are key aspects missing. Add effective titles from the worksheet, use color to showcase your story, and add an engaging visual.

Ta-da!  You have a nice visual report based on thoughtful data interpretation using your client’s feedback and expertise.  My hope is that by reading this post, you are more inspired to think of new ways to engage your client in the data and visually display findings.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating SW TIG Week with our colleagues in the Social Work Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our SW TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I’m Kylie Hutchinson (a.k.a. @EvaluationMaven), independent evaluation consultant and trainer with Community Solutions Planning & Evaluation and author of Survive and Thrive: Three Steps to Enhancing Your Program Sustainability.

The word I chose to memorialize this week is a small but important one. It’s the letter “a”, as in “She asked for a final evaluation report”.

As evaluators, many of us are accustomed to providing a single (and lengthy) final report at the end of the evaluation. However, change is in the air, and many of us would also like to see the demise of the final report because it often goes unread by busy decision makers and sits on a shelf collecting dust. But a two-page briefing note doesn’t work in all situations either. Clearly, one type of report does not fit all, which is where the concept of layering comes in.

Hot Tip: Layering is a term I coined in 2008 to describe the simultaneous use of diverse report formats to communicate your evaluation results. The purpose of layering is to give different stakeholders the option to go as shallow or as deep as they choose into your evaluation findings. It works like this. Imagine a lengthy report as the meat of a burger; it can be very heavy and take a long time to digest. Final reports are often very dense documents, and not all stakeholders have the time nor appetite to eat them. Sometimes, all they want is lettuce with a bit of tomato (e.g. a newsletter), or a slice of cheese (e.g. a podcast). Or they may be rushed and can only take a quick nibble of the bun (e.g. an infographic). Some of these users will be intrigued enough to eat the whole burger, appendices and all, while others might be satisfied with just a few bites. Layering works because each communication product contains the same key messages and is linked to a more detailed option, enticing the reader to learn more if they choose. By employing diverse communication strategies for these varying appetites, you give intended users the choice of how deeply they wish to delve into the results.

Rad Resource: A Short Primer on Effective Evaluation Reporting. In this upcoming book, I talk more about the concept of layering and present different ideas for communicating results beyond the traditional lengthy report.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation concepts, terms, or approaches. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hey everyone! I’m Echo Rivera, owner of Creative Research Communications and research associate at Center for Policy Research. My passion is helping evaluators bring creativity to the research communication process. Today I want to talk about your presentation design workflow.

Let me ask you something: does the process of making a presentation stress you out? Do you find you’re always scrambling last minute to finish a presentation on time?

Yeah, I’ve been there. When we have to make several presentations throughout the year, they can add up to a lot of wasted time when done inefficiently.

One part of your workflow might be the biggest problem: Adding visuals.

Does your workflow look something like this?

  1. You’re working on your presentation,
  2. You look at your slide and think “is there an image for that?”,
  3. You search and search and search online until you find the right one,
  4. Then you add it to your presentation, aaaand
  5. Repeat

Am I close? Or did I miss the step where you get lost in the rabbit hole of news articles, blogs or YouTube?

This simple act of looking for one image at a time is extremely inefficient. When you’re in SPSS crunching numbers, do you suddenly stop and start searching for articles for your lit review, then come back later to finish and print your output?

That would be super inefficient, right? The same idea applies to presentations.

Hot Tip:

You will be most efficient if you approach each presentation activity as a separate, standalone task.

SUGGESTED STEPS TO AN EFFICIENT PRESENTATION DESIGN WORKFLOW:

[1] Set Presentation Goals & Figure Out Your Story

  1.  Think through who the audience is and what will resonate with them the most.
  2. Decide on 1-3 key point(s) to make in the presentation.
  3. Brainstorm a “storyboard” that funnels into the key point(s)

[2] Draft Your Presenter Notes

  1. Following your storyboard, draft what you want to say on the slides
  2. Do a quick run-through, speaking aloud all of the notes, making adjustments to the order/organization, filling in any gaps, and removing “fluff.”
  3. Do another run-through to assess time. Add/remove content as necessary. Try to finalize content as much as possible.

[3] Design the Slides

  1. Copy & paste text from your slides into the presenter notes, adding back in only a few words onto the slide, and no more than 3 points per slide.
  2. Add high quality visuals on as many slides as possible, reducing excess text as you go along.
  3. Use design elements to make the remaining text effective (e.g., minimum font size 30).
  4. If necessary, add simple animations (e.g., appear)  to walk the audience through the content.
  5. Conduct a self-check on the overall presentation to ensure all content is readable & visually appealing.

Rad Resource: Step 3b should not take very long. The trick is to have a Visual Database ready to go. I created a free 6-day email course that shows you how to create one. Check it out!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hello all! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with a Hot Tip and Rad Resource for presentation designers!

On March 30, we unveiled a new, reorganized and freshened up Potent Presentations Initiative (p2i) website. Here’s what you’ll find:

  1. On the p2i HOME page, you’ll find a brief introduction to p2i, and our 3 key components – Message, Design, and Delivery. Webinars for each provide in-depth learning and reference some of the resources found on the PRESENTATION TOOLS & GUIDELINES page.
  2. All downloadable resources live on the PRESENTATION TOOLS & GUIDELINES page. The page is organized with Checklists & Worksheets on top, then resources aligned to the p2i components – Message, Design, and Delivery – followed by resources for Audience Engagement. As you browse this page, you’ll find links to additional content and pages along with the tools. Just look for tool titles that are links, as in this example: Notice that “Slide Design Guidelines” is a link. This will take you to another page of content on Slide Design. Another key addition is that the authors who contributed the content are now recognized and their names linked to their websites or LinkedIn profiles.
  3. Given that posters are the largest category of presentations at our annual conference, POSTER PRESENTATIONS warranted its own page. Here, you’ll find a page with specific guidelines for designing a conference poster, along with two additional navigation buttons. One takes you to more content on Research Poster Design, while the other points to  Award Winning Posters,  from recent AEA conferences, and other organizations. Each poster image is accompanied by a brief explanation of what makes it a winner.
  4. Don’t forget to visit the ABOUT US page to learn about the folks who have contributed to making p2i what it is!
  5. We now have a hashtag that is all ours: #aeap2i. Please tweet about the p2i website and resources using this tag. Follow the hashtag #aeap2i by clicking on the top button found on the p2i HOME page, and while you’re at it, why not follow the association itself (@aeaweb) as well! 

Behind the scenes…

Over the last year, we’ve worked to migrate and reorganize all content from the original p2i website to the main AEA site at eval.org (kudos to Zachary Grays, who did the heavy lifting!). We updated the tools, and added new content and introductory language where needed. One reason for the move was to protect us from hackers. Our original site, built on a different platform, was a constant target and over the years we received countless notices from members that the site URL had been maliciously redirected (meaning it took people to a different website), or that downloads were not working. We’re confident now the new site and all of our great content will be safe and reliable.

Be sure to visit eval.org/p2i and let us know what you think!

Sneak Preview! We have exciting new content for our p2i resource collection on its way to publication. Stay tuned to learn more!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, my name is Deven Wisner, the Manager of Human Capital & Business Analytics at Global Registration Services, Inc. By night, I am an independent evaluator and blogger — more on that here!

Word Clouds. Let’s talk about them. Specifically, when are they appropriate to use? And more importantly, when shouldn’t they be used.

If you’re like a lot people, word/tag clouds are a tool you use to visualize qualitative data. You put a bunch of data in and out pops a beautiful (okay, only sometimes) arrangement of words. If you are a dataviz nerd, you might be comforted by looking at something other than a qualitative results table. Even if you haven’t entitled yourself a dataviz machine, you might think your word cloud is quite eye-catching. And guess what? You’re probably right.

So, what’s the problem? Glad you asked. Word clouds may appear to be the “sexy” version of a table full of themes, definitions, frequencies, and examples, but they can also be extremely misleading. Also, when is the last time you saw a word cloud with all those important details listed? As Robert Hein from VisionCritical wrote about word clouds, “Size isn’t everything…” (2011).

More? Okay, here are some key issues with word clouds:

  • Readers use the size of a word to determine its importance
  • Visuals are often clouded (pun definitely intended) with prepositions
  • Interpretations are left entirely up to the reader

Therefore, as data driven decision makers who have a responsibility to disseminate information that is easy to digest, let’s stop using word clouds as the easy way out of not knowing what to do with our qualitative data!

Instead, how about we try to…

  • Avoid being lazy and list some great examples with some color to call out important pieces of the excerpt (again, no one cares about prepositions!)
  • Incorporate icons and color in your coding process (as great as black text on a white background is, let’s be a little more creative),
  • Add a photo to compliment a quote.

Still determined to get some word cloud action into your report? Fine. If you insist. Let’s agree to only use word clouds when…

  • You need a content specific decoration (because at the end of the day, that’s what they are).
  • You can’t form themes or trends.
  • Interpretation does not matter (data is purely exploratory).
  • You need help identifying themes (sometimes seeing word counts can help, but be careful about the bias involved with this).

So, what did we learn? Word clouds have their uses, but it is important to use the right visualization tool for the data that needs to be displayed. The resources below provide fresh ideas for visualizing qualitative data and help to identify which tool to use when.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Elissa Schloesser with Visual Voice, I am a freelance graphic designer specializing in infographics, data visualization and reporting. I enjoy making complex information more understandable and engaging. I have partnered with several evaluators to help visually communicate evaluation methods and findings.

Below are a few techniques I use to make logic models, theory of change and other process diagrams more visually appealing and digestible.

Hot Tip: Start by considering your diagram’s purpose and audience. Edit content accordingly.

Is your diagram intended to be analyzed up close by your reader, or is it intendd to provide a visual overview of your model or process? If its purpose is to be used as a summary, only include the most important and relevant information.

Hot Tip: Establish a hierarchy of information and apply a consistent design style to each level.

Not all information should get equal visual weight and real estate. The main concepts and connections should be the biggest and boldest, while the supporting details should be formatted to be smaller and lighter. Establish a design style for each level of information and make sure it is applied consistently throughout. This is especially important when you are working with a diagram that has lots of layers of information.

Hot Tip: Use color to enhance your diagram, not make the diagram.

I like to think of color as a bonus feature in any diagram. Selective color use can help emphasize connections in your diagram (but try not to get carried away). If you use every color in the rainbow, it tends to be less effective. Additionally, I like to test to see if my diagram is still understandable in grayscale even if it will most likely be viewed in color. If the diagram is not understandable without the color, go back and readjust the line weight, headings or iconography.

Rad Resource: Below is a sample process diagram to help illustrate the points above. It is similar in structure to what you might use for a logic model. This diagram could be recreated in Word or PowerPoint in a table with invisible borders.

Rad Resource: For more advice on how to make your diagrams more digestible, check out this blog post by Grank Denneman – “10 guidelines for creating good looking diagrams”.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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