AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Data Visualization and Reporting

Good day, I’m Bernadette Wright, program evaluator with Meaningful Evidence, LLC. Conducting interviews as part of a program evaluation is a great way better understand the specific situation from stakeholders’ perspectives. Online, interactive maps are a useful technique for presenting findings from that qualitative data to inform action for organization leaders who are working to improve and sustain their programs.

Rad Resource: KUMU is free to use to create public maps. A paid plan is required to create private projects (visible only to you and your team).

Here are the basic steps for using KUMU to integrate and visualize findings from stakeholder conversations.

1) Identify concepts and causal relationships from interviews.

Using the transcripts, you focus on the causal relationships. In the example below, we see “housing services helps people to move from homelessness to housing” (underlined).

2) Diagram concepts and causal relationships, to form a map.

Next, diagram the causal relationships you identified in step one. Each specific thing that is important becomes a “bubble” on the map. We might also call them “concepts,” “elements,” “nodes,” or “variables.”

Lessons Learned:

  • Make each concept (bubble) a noun.
  • Keep names of bubbles short.

 

3) Add details in the descriptions for each bubble and arrow.

When you open your map in KUMU, you can click any bubble or arrow to see the item’s “description” on the left (see picture below). Edit the description to add details such as example quotes.

4) Apply “Decorations” to highlight key information.

You can add “decorations” to bubbles (elements) and arrows (connections) using the editor to the right of your map. For the example map below, bigger bubbles show concepts that people mentioned in more interviews.

Also, green bubbles show project goals, such as the goal “People transitioned out of homelessness.”

Cool Tricks:

  • Create “Views” to focus on what’s most relevant to each stakeholder group. To make a large map manageable, create and save different “views” to focus on sections of the map, such as views by population served, views by organization, or views by sub-topic.
  • Create “Presentations” to walk users through your map. Use KUMU’s presentation feature to create a presentation to share key insights from your map with broad audiences.

Rad Resources:

  • KUMU docs. While KUMU takes time and practice to master, KUMU’s online doc pages contain a wealth of information to get you started.
  • Example maps. Scroll down the KUMU Community Page for links to the 20 most visited projects to get inspiration for formatting your map.
  • KUMU videos. Gene Bellinger has created a series of videos about using KUMU, available on YouTube here.

Organizations we work with have found these map presentations helpful for understanding and the situation and planning collaborative action. We hope they are useful for your evaluation projects!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi! I’m Sarah Dunifon, Research and Evaluation Associate at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). In my role, I create many reports and I’m always looking for efficient tools for data visualization. I’ve found a few different programs to display location data, which I’d like to share with the wider AEA community.

Rad Resources:

Google Fusion Tables

Google Fusion Tables is an experimental app add-on that you can link to Google Drive. It allows users to create online, interactive heat maps and feature maps. Privacy settings are managed in the same way as other Google products where users can decide on a range between public and only available to you as the user. Viewers can manipulate the maps in various ways, such as filtering results, scrolling around the map view, or switching between map types.

Feature map of countries with WCS offices – Fusion Tables

Infogr.am

Infogr.am offers quick and easy interactive heat maps which can be shared via weblink. The free version includes a United States map and a world map, and your data will be public, whereas the paid versions have data privacy, more map choices, and the option to download the maps as images.

Heat map of countries with WCS offices – Infogr.am

Excel Apps – Geographic Heat Map

With the “Geographic Heat Map” app on Microsoft Excel, you can create either a world or United States heat map. The data is private and you can save your final map as a picture, making it a good option for inserting into a report. This app doesn’t have much customizability in color and style, but I’ve been able to paste the image into another program (say Microsoft Word or PowerPoint) and edit the image there.

Heat map of countries with WCS offices – Geographic Heat Map with Excel Apps

Tableau

Tableau offers feature maps and heat maps for free, though the data will be public. This program is highly customizable and makes some beautiful visualizations. However, you might find there is a bit of a learning curve to using this software. The visualizations can be saved as an interactive display in “presentation mode” or uploaded to the Tableau Public gallery where they can be shared digitally.

Heat map of countries with WCS offices – Tableau

Excel Powermap

Powermap in Microsoft Excel lets you create private feature maps in a variety of themes on a 3D globe. The map can be an online interactive display or an image produced by taking a screen grab through the program. The screengrab puts a picture of the image onto clipboard, which you can then paste into another program.

Feature map of countries with WCS offices – Excel Powermap

Hot Tip: Consider how you intend to use the map before you start building it. If it needs to be interactive, choose an online format. If it needs to be put into a report, pick a program with capabilities to export a high-resolution image, rather than just a screenshot.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Greetings! I am Kendra Lewis, Evaluation Coordinator for the California 4-H Youth Development Program at University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources. Today I am going to share my experience with a “data party” as a way to engage stakeholders in evaluation data. We recently held a one-day workshop with 4-H camp staff (youth and adults) to review evaluation data collected at their camps last summer. We had nearly 30 people representing 6 camps attend. We presented results from across the state as a whole as well as specific results for each camp. Evaluation data was collected from two sources: youth campers and teen camp staff. I presented data in multiple representations (graphs, tables, word clouds) and posed open-ended prompts to initiate conversation.

Lessons Learned: Participants loved having the opportunity to explore the data, discuss what they thought the results meant, and formulate action plans with their camp team. The data party made the results accessible and understandable. All camps signed up to participate in the evaluation again, and we already have our next data party planned for Fall 2017 after this summer’s camps.

Hot Tip: Start with a “gallery walk” that gives an overview of the results. We had large posters that presented data from the state results, and had small groups of people walk around to review the posters. We made sure to mix youth with adults, and to put people from different camps together to ensure diversity in camp experiences.

Hot Tip: Create a “data placemat” for each site. We made a data placemat that was specific to each camp that they could review with their team. We made a placement for camper data and a placemat for the teen data so that the data could be reviewed separately for those different experiences.

Hot Tip: Word clouds are a great way to introduce qualitative data. Before giving attendees all the qualitative data, we presented word clouds so as not to overwhelm them. After reviewing the word clouds, each camp had the opportunity to go over all their qualitative data in full.

Rad Resource: Check out all these great ideas and pins from Kylie Hutchinson on data parties.

Rad Resource: See the Innovation Network’s slide deck on Data Placemats for more information about this cool tool.

Gallery Walk

Gallery Walk

Reviewing Data Placemats

Reviewing Data Placemats

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Dr. Michelle Chandrasekhar and I serve as Board Secretary for the Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA).  My work experience includes higher education and state government, and recently with local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies. Working in different venues reminded me that our evaluation reports share several key elements across disciplines, audiences, and purposes. Below are two of these common elements.

  • What we produce must be faultless. In talking about her report strategies used at the S. General Accounting Office’s Program Evaluation and Methodology Division, Eleanor Chelimsky told a 2006 AEA Conference audience that the reports her office produced had to be accurate. If there was any kind of error, it could provide justification for ignoring or refuting the report.

Hot Tip: Hard to read reports are not used. Carefully proofread your writing, logic, and results. Use a checklist and get multiple people to review the document. Ask for examples of previous reports the clients have liked or hated to review and reference for developing future reports.

  • The audience that reads your report has a different agenda from yours. Chelimsky also said that politicians (and we can agree, any decision-maker) understand evaluation within the context of their own agendas. Evaluators need to be aware of those agendas and skilled at presenting a credible case for their work.

Hot Tip: Reports tell a story and should be written bearing in mind the interests of your audience and what they do and do not know. Tell your audiences about The Characters (Who asked for this report? Who is involved?), The Setting (Why was this report requested? Why was the data collected?), The Plot (What are the research questions? What is the study design?), The Conflict (What are the issues or caveats?), and The Resolution (What are the results and recommendations?). Yes, even an internal report can include recommendations – you know the data!

Rad Resources: Check out these links for further reading:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA) Affiliate Week with our colleagues in the SEA Affiliate. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from SEA Affiliate members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings fellow evaluators! We are Veena Pankaj, Kat Athanasiades, Deborah Grodzicki, and Johanna Morariu from Innovation Network. Communicating evaluation data effectively is important—it can enhance your stakeholders’ understanding of evaluative information and promote its use. Dataviz is an excellent way to communicate evaluation results in an engaging way!

pankaj_image_01_soe_coverToday’s post provides a step-by-step guide to creating effective, engaging dataviz, using Innovation Network’s visual State of Evaluation 2016 as an example. State of Evaluation 2016 is the latest in our series documenting changes in evaluation capacity among nonprofits across the U.S.

Step 1: Identify your audience. For State of Evaluation, our audience was nonprofits, foundations, and their evaluators across the U.S.

Step 2: Select key findings. Analyze your data. Which findings are most relevant to your study and your audience? As evaluators, this is the easy part! We found that organizations funded by philanthropy are more likely to measure outcomes, and thought that would be interesting to our readers.

pankaj_image_02_people

pankaj_image_03_logic_modelspankaj_image_04_housesStep 3: Grab paper and pencil. Start drawing different ways to display your data. What images or concepts does your data evoke? Thinking beyond generic chart formats may help your audience better understand the meaning behind the data. Brainstorming as a team can really help keep creative ideas flowing!

 

Step 4: Gather feedback. Show your initial sketches to others and get their first impressions. Ask questions like:

  • What does this visualization tell you?
  • How long did it take you to interpret?
  • How can it be tweaked to better communicate the data?

Third party feedback can provide additional insights to sharpen and fine-tune your visualizations.

Step 5: Think about layout and supporting text. Once you’ve selected the artistic direction of your visualization, it’s time to add supportive text, label your visualization features, and think about page layout.

pankaj_image_05_layout pankaj_image_06_layout

Hot Tip: For inspiration, check out Cole Nussbaumer’s Storytelling with Data gallery.

Step 5. Digitize your drawings. If you are working with a graphic designer, it’s helpful to provide them with a clear and accurate mock-up of what you want your visualization to look like. We worked with a designer for State of Evaluation, but for the bulk of dataviz needs this is unnecessary. Digitizing is accomplished by translating your initial renderings into a digital format. Basic software such as PowerPoint, Word, or Excel is often all you need.

pankaj_image_07_digial1

pankaj_image_08_digital2

Rad Resource: Interested in seeing how our dataviz creations evolved? Check out State of Evaluation 2016!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

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Hello my fellow evaluators.  This is Chris Lysy, world renowned evaluation cartoonist and owner of the recently formed independent evaluation & design consultancy Freshspectrum LLC.

 

It’s happening.

 

The business world is starting to turn on big data.

 

There is a somewhat new-ish trend in coherent arguments on the perils of big data or the benefits of small data.  Or as this article puts it: Big Data Tells You What, Small Data Tells You Why.

lysy_image1

I know most of you will agree that mixed methods are awesome.  So why don’t we apply that to web evaluation!

Are you just looking at visits, pageviews, follower counts, and conversions?  Or in other words, numbers, numbers, and more numbers?  Enough is enough, it’s time to start putting these numbers into context.

Hot Tip: Get to know the individual readers.

An email address is a very personal piece of information that allows an organization to ask questions like…

  • “Why did you follow us?”
  • “What are you struggling with and how can we help?”
  • “Have any suggestions on how we can serve you better?”

Ask them directly, individually, and have them reply to your email.  Then follow-up.

I ask my data design workshop participants what they are struggling with all the time.  Why guess what content should be created when you can ask?

Hot Tip: Be a detective.

When looking at analytics I prefer the daily view.

Analytics have a rhythm.  Say an email newsletter goes out every Tuesday, you might see an immediate spike that day followed by a smaller boost on Wednesday.

But sometimes you get an unanticipated spike. Time to investigate, why exactly did that spike happen?

Rad Resource: Buzzsumo

It’s expensive but offers a lot of insight into publicly available social media and search statistics.  The best part is that you are not confined to only looking at your own sites.  Maybe your organization is not all that web savvy, so find out what works for a similar organization that is.

lysy_image2

Hot Tip: Understand the User Story

Someone visits a website homepage.  What do they do first?  Do they click on the big button at the top? Or maybe they head straight for the map in the middle of the page.  Or do they just exit immediately.

Looking at your data through a qualitative lens can help you better understand.

Rad Resource: My Free Qualitative Web Data Analytics Course

I have lots more to share about this topic (around collection, visualization, and reporting) but AEA365 posts are short.  So I just created a free course in order to go deeper into the subject matter.  If you are interested, sign up here.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hi! I’m Katherine Shea. Global Forest Watch (GFW) is one of many groups aiming to improve accountability through transparency by providing open data — in this case geospatial environmental data identifying deforestation in near-real time. Our goal is to reduce deforestation. Demonstrating that we’ve had an impact, through credible, visible data, is a unique challenge.

Over 1 million people have been to GFW’s website. But in the age of anonymous Internet users, how do we know whom we are reaching? How do we know how our data is used? The team at GFW uses three methods to answer these questions: Google Analytics, drop-ins who contact us on their own, and networks linked to GFW via staff and partners. Each of these methods has its weaknesses.

Lessons Learned:

  1. Analytics

According to Google Analytics, Global Forest Watch has been visited by people in every country. The data provide some insights, but only tells part of the story.

shea-1

Figure 1 Users of the website by city (source: analytics of GlobalForestWatch.org)

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Retrievable data is limited by the technology which tracks users by ip address, so it may be inaccurate. Many visitors can’t be tracked at all. For example, though the above map is informative, the graph shows nearly 10% of the data is missing. While we may know where a user is from and which layers they selected we can’t say how they applied the data. The limited information prevents our team from identifying potential impacts of our platform.

2. Drop-ins

Users can contact GFW directly through a button on the site, or via email. These direct contacts have brought some outcomes to our attention. For example, an Indonesian NGO emailed us about using GFW to support forest protection in vulnerable areas. Stories like these provide positive anecdotes for GFW, but because users reach out ad hoc, we’ll never know how many such stories exist or be able to sift through them to evaluate key measures of success. We also don’t hear about the failures, and follow-up with users can be time-consuming and costly, as many users don’t provide complete information.

3. Networks

Finally, we find user stories through networks — either stories that staff hear at meetings and conferences, or through partners already involved with us, such as donors or grantees — for example, the Jane Goodall Institute is partnering with GFW to include the platform in Ugandan forest rangers’ planning systems. But these stories represent a limited number of our users, particularly those we are already supporting — we still don’t know the factors for success for groups outside our network.

Identifying user stories to demonstrate impact represents a gap in existing methodologies for evaluating open-data platforms, but at GFW, we working hard to find a solution.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! I’m Tony Fujs, Data Scientist at the World Bank. As many fellow data nerds, I love to visualize the data I have in my hands, but I also like to spend time visualizing data that I don’t have: Missing data.

Why would I do that? Because bad handling of missing data can seriously bias the results of a statistical analysis.

Hot Tip:

  • Removing missing records from a dataset is generally not the right way to handle missing data!
  • For more information about missing data, and techniques to address it, see:

Baraldi, Amanda N., and Craig K. Enders. “An introduction to modern missing data analyses.” Journal of School Psychology 48.1 (2010): 5-37.

In this post, I will present a common heatmap variation technique used to visualize missing data, and identify potentially harmful missingness patterns.

STEP 1: The data table

Here is a dataset containing fake education records. In this dataset, each row represents a unique student, and contains information about the following variables:

  • Gender
  • IQ scores
  • Reading grades
  • Math grades

fujs_image1

It’s relatively easy to spot missing data in this table, but I want to make the missing cells impossible to ignore. Let’s color each missing data cell in a bright, easy to spot color!

STEP 2: Choose a catchy color to highlight empty cells

Now, I really can’t ignore these empty cells, but I still can’t see – at least not easily – if there is any interesting pattern in the missing data.

fujs_image2

Next, I will use some heat map technique to colorize the non-missing cells of this table.

STEP 3: Color the non-empty cells according to their values

I will use a monochrome color scale. Since I am interested in comparing empty cells with non-empty cells, I want to keep the color scheme as simple as possible to facilitate this comparison. The shades of grey highlight the change in values of the non-empty cells, while maintaining a strong contrast with the red empty cells.

Low values are colored in light grey, while high values are colored in dark grey. Since we are only interested in checking missing data patterns, the actual values of the non-empty cells can be hidden.fujs_image3

STEP 4: Remove the values

Some pattern now seems to emerge. But it is stillnot as obvious as it could be…

fujs_image4

 

Let’s reorder the rows according to the values of the IQ scores columns.

STEP 4: Sort columns values

It is now hard to miss the pattern of the missing data. Reading grades are missing for the lower half of the IQ score distribution… Assuming that a correlation exists between IQ scores and reading grades, removing the empty cells from the table would overestimate the average reading grade for this group of students.

fujs_image5

 

Rad Resources:

  • This visualization can be easily produced using the R package VIM:

http://www.statistik.tuwien.ac.at/forschung/CS/CS-2008-1complete.pdf

  • It can also be done in Excel using a couple of hacks:

http://policyviz.com/create-a-heatmap-in-excel/

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello from Vancouver, BC, Canada. My name is Janina Mobach. I work as the internal evaluator for the University of British Columbia Learning Exchange. Part of the university located off-campus in Vancouver’s inner city, our aim is to bring people together to exchange learning that leads to social change.

Applying visualization concepts into my work evaluating our Seniors Thrive program was not an option, it was essential. Since the program seeks to reduce social isolation amongst seniors experiencing marginalization, we work with people with limited English, low literacy levels, little income, and/or mental health and addiction issues. As such, I needed a way to communicate that was accessible for people across cultures and socio-economic classes.

Having a creative bent, the visualization ideas came quite naturally. But how did I translate my thoughts and paper sketches into the digital realm? Where could I begin?

Rad Resources:

Thankfully I stumbled across DiY Data Design by Chris Lysy (diydatadesign.com), my portal into the data visualization world. Chris has taken the overwhelming amount of information and packaged the concepts, techniques, and tools into digestible pieces. The best part is that it is affordably priced so it was easy to get approved. Much of what I’ve learned about visualization concepts was developed through membership in this group.

Hot Tips:

Microsoft PowerPoint. We’ve all used it for presentations. But did you know you can also use it to create visually rich reports?! It is now my go-to for all developmental evaluation updates and reports for Seniors Thrive.

Here’s an example:

mobach_image1

Lessons Learned:

Match your context.

As evaluators, we think about context all the time. But do we think about it in the realm of visualization?  I’ve learned the way I apply visualization concepts needs to match my context. My goal is that another evaluator could look at my reports and surmise what my context is like.

Lessons Learned:

mobach_image2

There are a lot of visualization techniques out there, but I keep coming back to these three simple ideas of colour, icons, and negative space. They’re my fundamentals, my checkpoints. How can I best use colour? What icons would capture my ideas? How am I using negative space to enhance readability?

Lessons Learned:

Everyone loves it. The seniors have really appreciated the colourful reports. “I love this. I get it now,” one senior exclaimed. But they aren’t the only ones. My supervisors have welcomed the format because it takes less of their valuable time to read. Even our funder was thrilled, “I was captivated, it was like reading a story.”

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Ann K. Emery and Denise Roosendaal here. We teamed up to produce a slide document about AEA’s vision for what the association could look like by 2020. Here’s a sneak peek of the fuller document, which will be released later this year.

Slide documents, or slidedocs, are slideshow-document hybrids. They’re designed inside presentation software like PowerPoint so that it’s easier to move text boxes, graphs, and diagrams around the page. But, unlike live presentations, slidedocs are intended to be read like regular reports. They contain full sentences, maybe even paragraphs, so that you can read the document without a presenter there to explain the content to you.

Here’s a preview of our slidedoc inside of PowerPoint. Can you spot the cover, the table of contents, and the introductory pages?

emery_roosendaal_image1

 

We used three data visualization and reporting techniques to reinforce AEA’s branding throughout the slidedoc: photos, fonts, and colors.

Photos of real-life AEA members brought the document to life more thana stock photographs ever could. We had several dozen photos of members from recent conferences (where members had signed photo releases). See any familiar faces?

emery_roosendaal_image2Fonts also reinforce branding. We used AEA’s font in the headings and subheadings. You can locate fonts inside an organization’s style guide. Or, use a free tool like www.whatthefont.com to find a close match.

emery_roosendaal_image3

Color is probably the easiest way to reflect an organization’s branding. We used AEA’s RGB code—the amount of red, green, and blue that get mixed together to produce that distinct shade of burgundy. You can also locate color codes inside an organization’s style guide. Or, use a free tool like www.instant-eyedropper.com. If you’re using PowerPoint or Excel, just click on Shape Fill (the paint can), then select More Fill Colors, and then select Custom. You’ll type the three pieces of the RGB code inside this tab. We used AEA’s red across the bands at the top and bottom of the page, in the headings and subheadings, and in the graphs and diagrams like this one:

emery_roosendaal_image4

What we didn’t include: a huge logo. Thanks to the custom photos, fonts, and colors, we didn’t need to clutter our document with an oversized logo. AEA’s logo is there, but it’s tiny. We intentionally placed the logo at the bottom of the page, not at the top, so that it isn’t stealing valuable real estate away from our content.

We look forward to sharing the full slidedoc with you later this year!

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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