AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Data Visualization and Reporting

Greetings fellow evaluators! We are Veena Pankaj, Kat Athanasiades, Deborah Grodzicki, and Johanna Morariu from Innovation Network. Communicating evaluation data effectively is important—it can enhance your stakeholders’ understanding of evaluative information and promote its use. Dataviz is an excellent way to communicate evaluation results in an engaging way!

pankaj_image_01_soe_coverToday’s post provides a step-by-step guide to creating effective, engaging dataviz, using Innovation Network’s visual State of Evaluation 2016 as an example. State of Evaluation 2016 is the latest in our series documenting changes in evaluation capacity among nonprofits across the U.S.

Step 1: Identify your audience. For State of Evaluation, our audience was nonprofits, foundations, and their evaluators across the U.S.

Step 2: Select key findings. Analyze your data. Which findings are most relevant to your study and your audience? As evaluators, this is the easy part! We found that organizations funded by philanthropy are more likely to measure outcomes, and thought that would be interesting to our readers.

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pankaj_image_03_logic_modelspankaj_image_04_housesStep 3: Grab paper and pencil. Start drawing different ways to display your data. What images or concepts does your data evoke? Thinking beyond generic chart formats may help your audience better understand the meaning behind the data. Brainstorming as a team can really help keep creative ideas flowing!

 

Step 4: Gather feedback. Show your initial sketches to others and get their first impressions. Ask questions like:

  • What does this visualization tell you?
  • How long did it take you to interpret?
  • How can it be tweaked to better communicate the data?

Third party feedback can provide additional insights to sharpen and fine-tune your visualizations.

Step 5: Think about layout and supporting text. Once you’ve selected the artistic direction of your visualization, it’s time to add supportive text, label your visualization features, and think about page layout.

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Hot Tip: For inspiration, check out Cole Nussbaumer’s Storytelling with Data gallery.

Step 5. Digitize your drawings. If you are working with a graphic designer, it’s helpful to provide them with a clear and accurate mock-up of what you want your visualization to look like. We worked with a designer for State of Evaluation, but for the bulk of dataviz needs this is unnecessary. Digitizing is accomplished by translating your initial renderings into a digital format. Basic software such as PowerPoint, Word, or Excel is often all you need.

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Rad Resource: Interested in seeing how our dataviz creations evolved? Check out State of Evaluation 2016!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

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Hello my fellow evaluators.  This is Chris Lysy, world renowned evaluation cartoonist and owner of the recently formed independent evaluation & design consultancy Freshspectrum LLC.

 

It’s happening.

 

The business world is starting to turn on big data.

 

There is a somewhat new-ish trend in coherent arguments on the perils of big data or the benefits of small data.  Or as this article puts it: Big Data Tells You What, Small Data Tells You Why.

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I know most of you will agree that mixed methods are awesome.  So why don’t we apply that to web evaluation!

Are you just looking at visits, pageviews, follower counts, and conversions?  Or in other words, numbers, numbers, and more numbers?  Enough is enough, it’s time to start putting these numbers into context.

Hot Tip: Get to know the individual readers.

An email address is a very personal piece of information that allows an organization to ask questions like…

  • “Why did you follow us?”
  • “What are you struggling with and how can we help?”
  • “Have any suggestions on how we can serve you better?”

Ask them directly, individually, and have them reply to your email.  Then follow-up.

I ask my data design workshop participants what they are struggling with all the time.  Why guess what content should be created when you can ask?

Hot Tip: Be a detective.

When looking at analytics I prefer the daily view.

Analytics have a rhythm.  Say an email newsletter goes out every Tuesday, you might see an immediate spike that day followed by a smaller boost on Wednesday.

But sometimes you get an unanticipated spike. Time to investigate, why exactly did that spike happen?

Rad Resource: Buzzsumo

It’s expensive but offers a lot of insight into publicly available social media and search statistics.  The best part is that you are not confined to only looking at your own sites.  Maybe your organization is not all that web savvy, so find out what works for a similar organization that is.

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Hot Tip: Understand the User Story

Someone visits a website homepage.  What do they do first?  Do they click on the big button at the top? Or maybe they head straight for the map in the middle of the page.  Or do they just exit immediately.

Looking at your data through a qualitative lens can help you better understand.

Rad Resource: My Free Qualitative Web Data Analytics Course

I have lots more to share about this topic (around collection, visualization, and reporting) but AEA365 posts are short.  So I just created a free course in order to go deeper into the subject matter.  If you are interested, sign up here.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hi! I’m Katherine Shea. Global Forest Watch (GFW) is one of many groups aiming to improve accountability through transparency by providing open data — in this case geospatial environmental data identifying deforestation in near-real time. Our goal is to reduce deforestation. Demonstrating that we’ve had an impact, through credible, visible data, is a unique challenge.

Over 1 million people have been to GFW’s website. But in the age of anonymous Internet users, how do we know whom we are reaching? How do we know how our data is used? The team at GFW uses three methods to answer these questions: Google Analytics, drop-ins who contact us on their own, and networks linked to GFW via staff and partners. Each of these methods has its weaknesses.

Lessons Learned:

  1. Analytics

According to Google Analytics, Global Forest Watch has been visited by people in every country. The data provide some insights, but only tells part of the story.

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Figure 1 Users of the website by city (source: analytics of GlobalForestWatch.org)

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Retrievable data is limited by the technology which tracks users by ip address, so it may be inaccurate. Many visitors can’t be tracked at all. For example, though the above map is informative, the graph shows nearly 10% of the data is missing. While we may know where a user is from and which layers they selected we can’t say how they applied the data. The limited information prevents our team from identifying potential impacts of our platform.

2. Drop-ins

Users can contact GFW directly through a button on the site, or via email. These direct contacts have brought some outcomes to our attention. For example, an Indonesian NGO emailed us about using GFW to support forest protection in vulnerable areas. Stories like these provide positive anecdotes for GFW, but because users reach out ad hoc, we’ll never know how many such stories exist or be able to sift through them to evaluate key measures of success. We also don’t hear about the failures, and follow-up with users can be time-consuming and costly, as many users don’t provide complete information.

3. Networks

Finally, we find user stories through networks — either stories that staff hear at meetings and conferences, or through partners already involved with us, such as donors or grantees — for example, the Jane Goodall Institute is partnering with GFW to include the platform in Ugandan forest rangers’ planning systems. But these stories represent a limited number of our users, particularly those we are already supporting — we still don’t know the factors for success for groups outside our network.

Identifying user stories to demonstrate impact represents a gap in existing methodologies for evaluating open-data platforms, but at GFW, we working hard to find a solution.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! I’m Tony Fujs, Data Scientist at the World Bank. As many fellow data nerds, I love to visualize the data I have in my hands, but I also like to spend time visualizing data that I don’t have: Missing data.

Why would I do that? Because bad handling of missing data can seriously bias the results of a statistical analysis.

Hot Tip:

  • Removing missing records from a dataset is generally not the right way to handle missing data!
  • For more information about missing data, and techniques to address it, see:

Baraldi, Amanda N., and Craig K. Enders. “An introduction to modern missing data analyses.” Journal of School Psychology 48.1 (2010): 5-37.

In this post, I will present a common heatmap variation technique used to visualize missing data, and identify potentially harmful missingness patterns.

STEP 1: The data table

Here is a dataset containing fake education records. In this dataset, each row represents a unique student, and contains information about the following variables:

  • Gender
  • IQ scores
  • Reading grades
  • Math grades

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It’s relatively easy to spot missing data in this table, but I want to make the missing cells impossible to ignore. Let’s color each missing data cell in a bright, easy to spot color!

STEP 2: Choose a catchy color to highlight empty cells

Now, I really can’t ignore these empty cells, but I still can’t see – at least not easily – if there is any interesting pattern in the missing data.

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Next, I will use some heat map technique to colorize the non-missing cells of this table.

STEP 3: Color the non-empty cells according to their values

I will use a monochrome color scale. Since I am interested in comparing empty cells with non-empty cells, I want to keep the color scheme as simple as possible to facilitate this comparison. The shades of grey highlight the change in values of the non-empty cells, while maintaining a strong contrast with the red empty cells.

Low values are colored in light grey, while high values are colored in dark grey. Since we are only interested in checking missing data patterns, the actual values of the non-empty cells can be hidden.fujs_image3

STEP 4: Remove the values

Some pattern now seems to emerge. But it is stillnot as obvious as it could be…

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Let’s reorder the rows according to the values of the IQ scores columns.

STEP 4: Sort columns values

It is now hard to miss the pattern of the missing data. Reading grades are missing for the lower half of the IQ score distribution… Assuming that a correlation exists between IQ scores and reading grades, removing the empty cells from the table would overestimate the average reading grade for this group of students.

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Rad Resources:

  • This visualization can be easily produced using the R package VIM:

http://www.statistik.tuwien.ac.at/forschung/CS/CS-2008-1complete.pdf

  • It can also be done in Excel using a couple of hacks:

http://policyviz.com/create-a-heatmap-in-excel/

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello from Vancouver, BC, Canada. My name is Janina Mobach. I work as the internal evaluator for the University of British Columbia Learning Exchange. Part of the university located off-campus in Vancouver’s inner city, our aim is to bring people together to exchange learning that leads to social change.

Applying visualization concepts into my work evaluating our Seniors Thrive program was not an option, it was essential. Since the program seeks to reduce social isolation amongst seniors experiencing marginalization, we work with people with limited English, low literacy levels, little income, and/or mental health and addiction issues. As such, I needed a way to communicate that was accessible for people across cultures and socio-economic classes.

Having a creative bent, the visualization ideas came quite naturally. But how did I translate my thoughts and paper sketches into the digital realm? Where could I begin?

Rad Resources:

Thankfully I stumbled across DiY Data Design by Chris Lysy (diydatadesign.com), my portal into the data visualization world. Chris has taken the overwhelming amount of information and packaged the concepts, techniques, and tools into digestible pieces. The best part is that it is affordably priced so it was easy to get approved. Much of what I’ve learned about visualization concepts was developed through membership in this group.

Hot Tips:

Microsoft PowerPoint. We’ve all used it for presentations. But did you know you can also use it to create visually rich reports?! It is now my go-to for all developmental evaluation updates and reports for Seniors Thrive.

Here’s an example:

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Lessons Learned:

Match your context.

As evaluators, we think about context all the time. But do we think about it in the realm of visualization?  I’ve learned the way I apply visualization concepts needs to match my context. My goal is that another evaluator could look at my reports and surmise what my context is like.

Lessons Learned:

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There are a lot of visualization techniques out there, but I keep coming back to these three simple ideas of colour, icons, and negative space. They’re my fundamentals, my checkpoints. How can I best use colour? What icons would capture my ideas? How am I using negative space to enhance readability?

Lessons Learned:

Everyone loves it. The seniors have really appreciated the colourful reports. “I love this. I get it now,” one senior exclaimed. But they aren’t the only ones. My supervisors have welcomed the format because it takes less of their valuable time to read. Even our funder was thrilled, “I was captivated, it was like reading a story.”

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Ann K. Emery and Denise Roosendaal here. We teamed up to produce a slide document about AEA’s vision for what the association could look like by 2020. Here’s a sneak peek of the fuller document, which will be released later this year.

Slide documents, or slidedocs, are slideshow-document hybrids. They’re designed inside presentation software like PowerPoint so that it’s easier to move text boxes, graphs, and diagrams around the page. But, unlike live presentations, slidedocs are intended to be read like regular reports. They contain full sentences, maybe even paragraphs, so that you can read the document without a presenter there to explain the content to you.

Here’s a preview of our slidedoc inside of PowerPoint. Can you spot the cover, the table of contents, and the introductory pages?

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We used three data visualization and reporting techniques to reinforce AEA’s branding throughout the slidedoc: photos, fonts, and colors.

Photos of real-life AEA members brought the document to life more thana stock photographs ever could. We had several dozen photos of members from recent conferences (where members had signed photo releases). See any familiar faces?

emery_roosendaal_image2Fonts also reinforce branding. We used AEA’s font in the headings and subheadings. You can locate fonts inside an organization’s style guide. Or, use a free tool like www.whatthefont.com to find a close match.

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Color is probably the easiest way to reflect an organization’s branding. We used AEA’s RGB code—the amount of red, green, and blue that get mixed together to produce that distinct shade of burgundy. You can also locate color codes inside an organization’s style guide. Or, use a free tool like www.instant-eyedropper.com. If you’re using PowerPoint or Excel, just click on Shape Fill (the paint can), then select More Fill Colors, and then select Custom. You’ll type the three pieces of the RGB code inside this tab. We used AEA’s red across the bands at the top and bottom of the page, in the headings and subheadings, and in the graphs and diagrams like this one:

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What we didn’t include: a huge logo. Thanks to the custom photos, fonts, and colors, we didn’t need to clutter our document with an oversized logo. AEA’s logo is there, but it’s tiny. We intentionally placed the logo at the bottom of the page, not at the top, so that it isn’t stealing valuable real estate away from our content.

We look forward to sharing the full slidedoc with you later this year!

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Data Visualization and Reporting (DVR) Week with our colleagues in the DVR Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from DVR TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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We are Lauren Baba and Carol Cahill with the Center for Community Health and Evaluation (CCHE), part of Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) in Seattle. Our team of consultants works with a various stakeholders to evaluate community health initiatives, clinic-community linkages, and health improvement coalitions. We are always brainstorming new ways to make evaluation reports creative, accessible, and interesting for community partners. Drawing on the team’s 20 years of experience, we have developed reporting recommendations to help evaluators write appropriately for different target audiences and clients.

Hot Tip: Synthesize, don’t just summarize. Clients and community partners are looking for your insights into what evaluation findings mean for their work and communities. Refer to Michael Quinn Patton’s AEA365 tips to help focus your synthesis. Then, captivate audiences early; do not wait to answer the “So what?” question at the end of your report. See CCHE’s executive summary for the Sierra Health Foundation as an example.

Hot Tip: Short reports can pack a bigger punch. Right-size the length and level of detail you share with different audiences. If you write a full-length report, consider pulling together tailored briefs for each target audience’s interests, similar to CCHE’s issue briefs for the National Leadership Academy for the Public’s Health.

Hot Tip: Break the mold and write reports that do not follow the usual order of contents or formatting. Be responsive to your client’s expectations for the report, but try to open their eyes to alternatives:

  • Respect your readers’ time and begin with your key takeaway message, then provide the supporting information.
  • Move methodology sections to the end of your report. Or instead include them in a technical appendix with more detailed discussion and data tables for interested readers.

Rad Resource: Check the reading level of your reports and use plain language guides like GHRI’s Program for Readability In Science & Medicine (PRISM) resources to help you write using language that your audiences will understand.

*Look for Part 2 of our article tomorrow!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! We are Monica Hargraves and Miranda Fang, from the Cornell Office for Research on Evaluation.  We presented together at Eval2012 would like to share some practical tips on literature searches in the context of evaluation.

2016 Update: Monica Hargraves is now Associate Director for Evaluation Partnerships at the Cornell Office for Research on Evaluation; Miranda Fang is now Manager, Development Strategy and Operations at Teach For America – Los Angeles

Program managers often face an expectation worthy of Hercules: to provide strong research-quality evidence that their program is effective in producing valuable outcomes. This is daunting, particularly if the valued outcomes only emerge over a long time horizon, the program is new or small, or the appropriate evaluation is way beyond the capacity of the program.  The question is, what can bridge the gap between what’s feasible for the program and what’s needed in terms of evidence?

Hot Tip: Strategic literature searches can help. And visual program logic models provide an ideal framework for organizing the search process.

Quoting our colleagues Jennifer Urban and William Trochim in their AJE 2009 paper on the Golden Spike,

The golden spike is literally a place that can be drawn on the visual causal map … where the evaluation results and the research evidence meet.”

We use pathway models, which build on a columnar logic model and tell the logical story of the program by specifying the connections between the activities and the short-term outcome(s) they each contribute to, and the subsequent short- or mid-term outcome(s) that those lead to, and so on.  What emerges is a visual program theory with links all the way through to the program’s anticipated long-term outcomes.

The visual model organizes and makes succinct the key elements of the program theory. It helps an evaluator to zero in on the particular outcomes and causal links that are needed in order to build credible evidence beyond the scope of their current evaluation.

Here’s an example, from a Cornell Cooperative Extension program on energy conservation in a youth summer camp.  Suppose the program needs to report to a key funder whose interest is in youth careers in the environmental sector. If the program evaluation demonstrates that the program is successful in building a positive attitude towards green energy careers, then a literature search can focus on evidence for the link (where the red star is) between that mid-term outcome and the long-term outcome of an increase in youth entering the green workforce.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365, an occasional series. The contributions for Best of aea365 are reposts of great blog articles from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I am Jonathan Jones, Senior Monitoring and Evaluation Technical Advisor at CAMRIS International. I am also co-chair of AEA’s International and Cross Cultural TIG.

As an evaluator, have you ever gotten feedback from someone that changed the way you write evaluation reports? Someone* gave me this great feedback several years ago on a draft evaluation report I had written – assume that the report reader does not know anything about the program that is being evaluated. Therefore, it is important to include (concise) information about key milestone programmatic events and important contextual events that might have influenced the program – ideally in a graphic.

From that point on, I have included a timeline graphic in the introductory section of my evaluation reports. This graphic is always well received by the client. Not only does the graphic tell the story of the program in one picture, program staff tend to really like it because it shows that the program did not take place in a vacuum – that there were typically significant contextual events that were influential.

Rad Resource: I use Office Timeline to create the timeline graphic (although there are many other software solutions available). Office Timeline is a simple, easy to learn, PowerPoint plug in. The free version works well, but I found that I quickly bumped up against the limitations, and needed the functionality of the paid version. Below is an example of a timeline graphic created with Office Timeline (note, the information in the graphic is fake).

Jones

Hot Tip: I like to include contextual milestones above the timeline, and program milestones below (see example above).

Hot Tip: Ask the implementer/program staff to identify the key context and programmatic milestone events for you! This is a great way to involve the implementer in the evaluation process. I always send the implementer a simple table to fill out.

Hot Tip: Include the evaluation (and any prior evaluations) as milestone program events. This can help the reader situate the evaluations conducted for the program within the wider context.

Hot Tip: Less is more! It can be tempting to include every event that might have been important, but the graphic can quickly become cluttered, and the story of the program lost. Work with the implementer to prioritize the key events that must be included. I also don’t include actual dates of key events, with the idea that the reader will not remember key dates, but will want to remember the overall story.

*My thanks to Tessie Catsambas, CEO/CFO of EnCompass LLC who gave me this important feedback several years ago on an evaluation report I wrote.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Our names are Marc Wheeler and Salem Valentino and we are internal evaluators for Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

There is a lot of buzz today about infographics.  Many of you may have thought about using infographics in your evaluation reports to try to translate your findings more effectively.  We recently took the plunge and incorporated infographics in our 2013 Youth Outcomes Report .

For example, we created the infographic below to clarify the theoretical connection between the short-term outcomes we currently measure for each youth and those long-term outcomes of interest to many stakeholders. The graphic summarized a large quantity of research literature in a single infographic that was easily interpretable and concise.

Wheeler 1

Lessons Learned:

  1. High-quality infographics require a certain level of expertise; as we didn’t have the relevant experience in house, we contracted with an external graphic designer who delivered great results.
  2. Beyond experience, it also takes time to develop your infographics and get them right.  First, you need to figure out the story behind your data.  Then, what are the best ways to illustrate this story, while remaining true to the data?  For instance, we wanted to communicate effect sizes but didn’t want to take up space in our report explaining what they meant to a lay audience.  So instead, we developed the visualization below to better illustrate our story of the magnitude of youth outcomes.  Lastly, infographics require a number of iterations and can benefit from the input of diverse audiences.  Budget your time accordingly.

Wheeler 2

  1. Understanding your project needs will help you choose the right designer. We looked at several resources on the internet to find a graphic designer. For us it was important that our work with the designer was collaborative; we wanted to ensure the quality of the evaluation content. Due to our timeline, it was also important that our designer could design the entire report and not merely the infographics.  You may also want to ask your designer how comfortable they are with Excel or other types of data you will be using in the report.

Rad Resources:

Elissa Schloesser at Visual Voice – our designer’s 5 Steps for Translating Evaluation Findings into Infographics

Visual.ly’s Marketplace service will find a designer for you and help you create an infographic for one price.

Easel.ly is a website where you can create your own infographic for free.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365, an occasional series. The contributions for Best of aea365 are reposts of great blog articles from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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