AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | culturally responsive evaluation

Namaste, my name is Revolution MacInnes and I’m the Senior Advisor at Become, a nonprofit in Chicago using culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) as a tool in manifesting racial equity and justice with communities of color.

CRE has an incredible power to transform people, programs, organizations, and communities. Understanding that CRE is built on a foundation of achieving equity and justice in and for marginalized people and communities isn’t always readily apparent when explaining what CRE involves.

While expanding the reach of CRE, we have sometimes struggled to communicate just what it is we do, how we do it and why. In communicating the core concepts of culturally responsiveness, we developed a white paper for non-evaluation audiences. Making it accessible to a wide range of readers proved to be a challenge. Let’s face it – even explaining the power and benefits of evaluation to potential clients can be difficult.

As I observed the process of developing our white paper, I realized we needed something exciting and different to communicate the power of our ideas to a wider audience. So, our team set out to produce a comic book that explains the first phase of our community development model inspired by CRE, a Community Engagement Initiative.

I joke that our elevator pitch requires me to hit the emergency stop button and spend 45 minutes explaining what we do. Having something like a comic book or an animated video to explain the power and capabilities of your work might just be the thing to set your work apart from the crowd.

Hot Tips:

  • Finding a comic book or manga artist passionate to communicate and foster change, who can work on a tight budget, isn’t as difficult as it might seem. There are thousands of young artists in school or working as graphic designers by day, with dreams of being the next big thing in comics. The chance to publish their work and actually see it in the hands of people would motivate many.
  • Create both Kindle Book and Apple Book versions. Comic books look great on tablets, smartphones and iBook readers.
  • Look for full color comic book printing on Google. There are several companies that will produce fantastic looking physical copies of your comic book for reasonable prices.

Rad Resource: For our comic book, we partnered with a talented comic book artist who is a passionate about helping others and contributing to positive causes.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Become: Community Engagement and Social Change week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from authors associated with Become. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hi, I’m Mila Kachovska, a Fellow of Become. I often ask myself and our partners, “How does culture influence us?” Culture shapes our thoughts and perceptions in all areas of life, from interactions with friends and family, to conducting work, to how language is used, to how problems are solved, and challenges faced.

Culturally Responsive Evaluations and Assessment (CREA) and its efforts to improve outcomes of practices recognizes that we must learn to appreciate cultural context. We tend to be unaware of our own biases, placing cultural stereotypes on others. The ability to distinguish and work with diverse stakeholders and audiences is critical in understanding cultural and contextual dimensions well.

Over the past two years, ACTMA project (Assessing Computational Thinking in Maker Activities) has been deliberately growing their cultural responsiveness in their research in formal and informal physics environments. It has been imperative for the research team to draw upon culturally responsive practices to evaluate judgments grounded in culture within the project’s stakeholders and participants.

During pilot studies using maker spaces to enhance computational thinking, underrepresented students’ cultural and linguistics practices were seen as assets to the work rather than barriers to the learning process. ACTMA’s team foregrounded students’ cultural practices as a main objective to honor and explore students’ backgrounds and how they can strengthen the learning process. In doing this, students who were uncomfortable with science and technology saw themselves in the work and opened their eyes to new career possibilities. Drawing upon the findings of the pilot studies, the research team carried out analysis of data sets and artifacts of students showing their sense of expertise and ownership.

Why did we develop a culturally responsive practice? It was imperative for us to understand the audience, stakeholders, and ourselves. The evaluation process drew upon ethical implications and examined and validated personal and cultural perspectives. Taking a culturally responsive approach allowed the team to incorporate multiple voices by making sure the work is emitted in an honest and respectful way with everyone involved.

Hot Tip: Keep returning to the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation and establish regular check-points in your work routine to practice the five essentials listed for culturally competent evaluators:

  1. Acknowledge the complexity of cultural identity. Recognize, respond to, and work to reconcile differences between and within cultures and subcultures.
  2. Recognize the dynamics of power. Work to avoid reinforcing cultural stereotypes and prejudice in work.
  1. Recognize and eliminate bias in social relations. Be thoughtful in language use and other social relations to reduce bias when conducting evaluations.
  2. Employ culturally congruent epistemologies, theories, and methods. Seek to understand how the constructs are defined by cultures and are aware of the many ways epistemologies and theories can be utilized, how data can be collected, analyzed and interpreted, and the diversity of context in which findings can be disseminated.
  3. Continue self-assessment. Regularly monitor the extent of serving as an open, responsive instrument given relevant attributes of an evaluation context.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Become: Community Engagement and Social Change week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from authors associated with Become. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

 

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Hi, my name is Dominica McBride and I’m Founder and CEO of Become, a nonprofit using culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) as a tool in realizing social justice and thriving communities. We view the following components as essential to CRE: 1) learning and responding to the culture of the community throughout the evaluation, 2) partnering with and building capacity in the community that’s being served by the program or policy, 3) responding to the context through advocacy and/or organizing. These components, in addition to the evaluation itself, can get costly. As a nonprofit, we have learned ways to minimize costs and still conduct a CRE.

Hop Tips:

  • In learning and responding to culture, partner with local students who have experience working and/or living in the community being served (or a community with similar demographics, assets, challenges, etc.). Graduate students often are looking for a chance to apply what they learn or give back to the community. We have had wonderful experiences working with students in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Applied Behavioral Analysis, and Community Psychology, among others. These graduate programs overlap or integrate evaluation, so are a good fit for the work.
  • Partnering with members in the community served by the program fulfills many purposes, from building capacity to realize their dreams for their community to lessons learned about culture, content, and humanity for ourselves. When residents volunteer on projects because they want to make a difference in their community, it has also helps to defray costs. There is so much local talent, wisdom and knowledge that can well serve the evaluation, program, and related policies, it is important to utilize what is there.
  • Responding to context can be an intense endeavor. We have found it helpful to partner with local professionals who are a part of volunteer or philanthropic groups. For example, when Illinois’ governor cut violence prevention and youth development funds, thus, cutting one of our partner’s program budget in half, we partnered with them to write a report specifically for advocating reinstatement of lifesaving funds. We didn’t have a budget for this, so we collaborated with a group of volunteer hackers to create a community index for advocacy purposes. We also partnered with a volunteer graphic designer who helped design the report.

Rad Resources: Integral values and lessons from the Asset-Based Community Development Institute can be helpful in planning a CRE on a shoestring, as taking an asset-based approach is necessary in simultaneously minimizing costs and contributing to sustainable social change.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Become: Community Engagement and Social Change week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from authors associated with Become. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello!  My name is Imelda K Moise, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Geography and Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami, Florida. Prior to this, I was a GIS /Global Health M&E Advisor, a Research Specialist and spent six years as a Peace Corps technical trainer in Zambia. Because of these experiences, much of my work has primarily focused on utilizing multi-method approaches, community-based participatory research (CBPR) and evidence-informed interventions that are culturally responsive to a specific problem identified for a given context and practice (e.g., in the areas of diffusion and distribution of disease, health care/utilization and geographical targeting). As a 2016-17 MSI Fellow, our cohort examined the Intersection between Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE).

My contribution to the group project focused on how geographic thinking can help us understand a wide range of SDOH and identification of at-risk groups in affected communities to provide tailored interventions and services to the right people, in the right places and in a timely manner. The following example from one of my projects highlights how I have applied geographical thinking to support neighborhood scale interventions.

Lessons Learned: How would you go about identifying the most at-risk populations and neighborhoods to provide tailored interventions and services in a timely manner? This was the issue in post-Katrina New Orleans.  What we found was that although the hurricane itself was a huge trauma, for those who lived in the affected areas, the mental strain did not stop after floodwaters receded. To help identify at-risk areas and populations in need, we examined hospital data from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals in New Orleans from 2004 (pre-Katrina) and 2008 (post-Katrina), looking for a change in the rate of hospitalizations for substance abuse. “What we saw was that geographic patterns of hospitalization for substance abuse disorders shifted in post-Katrina from flood-exposed areas to less exposed areas located in the center of the city, areas used for evacuees displaced by the hurricane.”

The generated information can inform public health officials deploy targeted interventions and treatment for substance use disorders to those affected individuals and neighborhoods in a timely manner. Further, physicians and other health care providers can use these findings as evidence to attend to the patient’s state of mind after such trauma.

As evaluators, we can contribute to research on CRE by teasing out connections between place effects and health disparities by utilizing geographic tools and methodologies to explore these associations. If you do not have expertise in using geographic tools and methodologies, you can leverage local resources in your community such as universities and county health departments. 

Rad Resources:

Hospitalizations for substance abuse disorders before and after Hurricane Katrina: Spatial clustering and area level predictors, New Orleans, 2004 and 2008.  

“A Process Guide to Monitoring and Evaluation for Informed Decision Making” provides evaluators with an overview of geospatial analysis techniques and ways to apply geospatial analysis within the context of M&E, along with additional resources.

 

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello!  My name is Nicole Henley, an Assistant Professor and Health Care Management Program Coordinator in the Department of Health Science and Human Ecology at California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB).  My research interests are access to health care for vulnerable populations and social determinants of health.  The main courses I teach are: Health Services Administration, Statistics, and Social Determinants of Health.  As a 2016-17 MSI Fellow, our cohort examined the Intersection Between Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE).

My contribution to the group project focused on the Health and Health Care domain of the SDOH framework, and the importance of incorporating CRE in the theoretical framework of health-related programs addressing the complex needs of vulnerable populations. 

Lessons Learned: Vulnerable populations have different needs than the general population; Therefore, it’s important to examine the roles of structural and environmental factors, and their affect and effect on this group’s overall health and health outcomes.  Their health and health care challenges intersect with social determinants of health and when “culture” is embedded in the theory, design, and practice of evaluation, systematic errors, cultural biases, and stereotypes are reduced (AEA, 2011), and as a result, the program produces valid and reliable results, and improved population health outcomes and quality of life for this population.

Rad Resource:

If you’re interested in learning more about culturally-appropriate theory that takes into account the complex needs of vulnerable populations, read the article, “Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations: Application to Medical Care Use and Outcomes for Homeless People” (Gelberg, L. et al, 2000).

Rad Resource:

Time for Change Foundation (TFCF) is a non-profit organization in San Bernardino, CA that has integrated the “culture” of the vulnerable population they serve in the theory and design of their Homes for Hope Program, which is a permanent supportive housing program that assist homeless families in becoming self-sufficient by placing them directly into their own apartment and providing intensive case management and support services.  TFCF currently has 13 scattered-site locations throughout San Bernardino, CA. TFCF is one of many community-based organizations making a difference in the lives of vulnerable populations.  To learn more about TFCF’s success stories, please visit their website: http://www.timeforchangefoundation.org/.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings! I am Naomi Hall-Byers, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. I am also a 2017 Minority Serving Institution fellow. During last year’s annual conference, my cohort and I explored the intersection between the social determinants of health (SDOH) and culturally responsive evaluation (CRE). SDOH are social and environmental factors affecting an individual’s health and quality of life. This article focuses on one SDOH, social and cultural context. According to Healthy People 2020, social and community context may include factors such as social cohesion, civic participation, discrimination, incarceration, social networks, norms, and social capital. As an applied social psychologist, with a background in public health, I am acutely aware of the importance of understanding social and cultural context. I provide some thoughts on how to incorporate this SDOH into health focused evaluations.

Lessons Learned: If we want to make a bigger impact on health, as evaluators, we have to move away from focusing primarily on individuals. Individual behavior is important, but behavior still takes place within the context of the social environment. This context is both complex and intersectional, and ultimately influences the program and its evaluation components.

Lesson Learned: It is important to situate CRE within elements of an evaluation framework. The key is to embed CRE throughout the evaluation process. One way to do this is to create and conduct an evaluation WITH the organization, and not FOR the organization. Understanding the cultural context in which the project/program operates, and being responsive to it, will create stronger cooperation, trust, collaboration, and engagement. This will ultimately produce better data, which can strengthen the organization, and the community it serves.

In closing, it is important for health-focused evaluators to seek to understand how each of the five SDOH areas intersects with CRE in ways that affect the health status of individuals and the communities in which they live.

Rad Resources: For more information on the social determinants of health visit Healthy People 2020: https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-of-health, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/cdcprograms/index.htm

For more information on culturally responsive evaluation, and access to a plethora of resources, visit the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment: https://crea.education.illinois.edu/

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Arthur Hernandez and I am a Professor at the University of the Incarnate Word. I have served as evaluator and teacher of evaluation and am very interested in the processes of cultural responsiveness in practice.

Lesson Learned: It seems to be generally accepted that cultural context influences the manner in which individuals perceive and understand reality and cultural context is a matter of development, identity and the foundation for making judgments about value.  Thus, the inclusion of means of and mechanisms for Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE) in our practice is requisite to competent, ethical practice.

Hot Tip:  It is essential to invest in self-assessment.  All too often the effort to engage in CRE involves solely examining participants to determine the impact of identifiable culture on their perception, perspectives and behavior.   While this is certainly important, it is equally important to be aware of or to engage in inquiry to ascertain not usually recognized elements of culture and of how these potentially alternative ways of knowing and valuing may be in influencing the dynamic or interest much less how they might conflict with the culture of the evaluator as well as other important stakeholders.  At a minimum, this self-assessment should be concerned with knowledge, attitudes, familiarity and acceptance.  Knowledge about the community in which the evaluation will take place is essential for development of meaningful metrics and methods.  Gauging attitudes about the community and its values and expectations is essential to ensure that contact with the members is respectful and reasonable (to them).  Familiarity deals with the necessity of establishing meaningful (as opposed to utilitarian) relationships with members of the community and acceptance is the requirement that evaluators understand differences as legitimate and of value in their own right.

Rad Resources: Some good starting point references include:

  • C. Griffith & B. Montrosse-Moorhead (Eds.), Revisiting truth, beauty, and justice: Evaluating with validity in the 21st century. New Directions for Evaluation, 142.
  • Thompson-Robinson, M., Hopson, R., SenGupta, S. (Eds.), In search of cultural competence in evaluation. New Directions for Evaluation,

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Peace! My name is Dr. Monique Liston and I am a GEDI alum. I enjoyed every minute of my internship year and consider my cohort close friends in the professional and academic world. GEDI exposed me to evaluation as a profession. While I felt like I lacked evaluator skills because of the limitations of my graduate program, the GEDI program connected me to resources to help me increase my own capacity. The mentorship provided by the GEDI program leadership helped me to define myself as a professional, focused on racial justice and liberation, within the field of evaluation. Since I graduated from the program, I have applied the things that I have learned to continue my personal and professional development. Here are two HOT TIPS I have for new evaluators / new GEDI that I gained from my experience in the program.
Hot Tip 1: Follow up with anyone and everyone. I know that many people who know me would not believe that I was shy, but I am. GEDI programs put me in close contact with the heavy hitters in the evaluation field. While many members of my cohort had strong small-talk game, I often felt like I was missing out because my anxiety around meeting people kept me quiet in many social situations with people who’s work I had admired. I opted however to make sure that I emailed after being in those spaces. A short – I saw you at X place. I appreciated that you said Y. I am working on Z. – note went a long way. I was able to develop relationships in a way that was comfortable and affirming for me. In addition, many people do not follow up, so following up in general helps you to stand out in a crowd! I also made new friends in the field from across the country.
Hot Tip 2: Read. Read. Read. There is no shortage of evaluation literature, but the more you read, the more opportunities that you have to connect your experiences to the reflections of others. When I was in the program, I was overwhelmed because I felt that others who came from schools with intense evaluation programs were constantly inundating the conversation with theorists and frameworks that I had not been exposed to. Now that I am well-versed in evaluation literature I cannot get enough of it! The GEDI program is an excellent opportunity to find the literature that interests you and even connect to the key authors in that area!
Rad Resources:
For my work, bridging racial justice and culturally responsive evaluation was key. Here are two readings that helped:
McDermott, C. M., & O’Connor, G. C. (2002). Managing radical innovation: an overview of emergent strategy issuesJournal of product innovation management19(6), 424-43

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Greetings from alumnae of the GEDI cohort, Ohana. We are Yamelith Aguilar, MPH, and Tiffinie Jana’e Cobb, MPH. Today’s notes are based on our reflections on incorporating culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) in multiple evaluation phases.

CRE is a growing movement in the evaluation field that demands our attention to the complex cultural context in play. CRE gives a promising approach to be authentic in community partnerships. As Public Health Evaluators we have witnessed evaluation’s impact on our most vulnerable communities and want to share practical tips on the use of CRE to strengthen relationships between evaluators and communities.

Hot Tip 1: Give everyone impacted a voice.
In addition to inviting the usual suspects to the planning process, find ways to include service recipients to share their opinions and priorities as to what defines a successful program.

Hot Tip 2: Be sure to design activities to capture input across the organizational structure.
A finding from a focus group experience demonstrated the importance of using methods that prioritize equity in feedback. All participants agreed with the CEO’s statements during a discussion. A staff waited until the discussion was over to privately express a different opinion. Activities with non-verbal methods were helpful thereafter for all participants to contribute.

Hot Tip 3: Ensure that your reports are accessible and culturally appropriate
Instead of 100-page evaluation reports, we strive to create reports that are easily digestible and WILL be fully read! Incorporating CRE into reporting and dissemination requires that the evaluation team fully understand all relevant stakeholders’ needs, including persons the program aims to reach.

Hot Tip 4: Ask stakeholders what they want to see.
During the planning phase, ask stakeholders what outcomes would be most useful to them. This will help prepare and guide the evaluation team as they begin designing. Some additional issues to consider during the design include: languages of all stakeholders, level of education, and representative images used throughout the report.

Rad Resources: To better engage stakeholders in your evaluation outcomes, design accessible and culturally appropriate infographics. Excellent free sites include: Canva or Piktochart.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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“We don’t see the world as it is. We see it as we are.” – Anais Nin, poet

Hello! We are Ammy Sena and Jenifer “Lucy” Rogers. Cultural awareness of ourselves and of others is a critical step for fair, meaningful evaluations. As 2016-2017 GEDI scholars, we had the opportunity to learn about culturally responsive evaluation. It was an honor to learn from key practitioners, including Dr. Leona Ba whose passion in teaching culture and evaluation was evident during her webinar and summer institute course. We would like to share two tips about culturally responsive evaluation that were particularly relevant during our internship years.

Hot Tip 1: Be aware of your culture.

As GEDI scholars we started our journey by learning how to be self-aware and to understand our own culture and biases – a lesson championed, honed and taught by Dr. Hazel Symonette at the beginning of each GEDI program year. Dr. Ba reinforced this practice during her teachings by sharing her own cultural journey working in various settings. We learned that culture belongs the evaluators, program participants and the broader context of the evaluation. Be careful of common misunderstandings such as culture is static, or that race or ethnicity are the main foci. Culture is, instead, dynamic with multiple layers to consider (e.g. national, economic, organizational, generational, gender, religion, etc.).

Hot Tip 2: Attempt to understand all the values and assumptions at play before engaging or implement the evaluation.

Hear the values of relevant stakeholders, which shed light on what is believed to be good, important, or valuable in a culture, influencing the assumptions present in an evaluation. It is critical for culturally responsive evaluators to clarify values and assumptions in a systematic way. By discussing values and understanding assumptions of stakeholders, the evaluation will be more successful in asking the “right” questions.

Rad Resource:  We suggest taking a look at this guide by Dr. Hazel Symonette to calibrate and check the self as an evaluator prior to engaging others.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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