AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Independent Consulting

Hello, I’m Martha Brown, and I started my consulting business in 2016 thanks to some encouragement from a group of passionate independent consultants. I was recently inspired by a keynote speaker, Lea Bill, at the 2018 CES Conference. She displayed a logic model that was circular and artistic, and it included the values of the people she worked with. I immediately thought of one my clients, a botanical garden, and how I could use their stated values to deepen their thinking about their programs.

Like Kylie Hutchinson’s data parties, I decided to have a “logic model party” full of big sheets of paper and lots of colored markers. We started by determining outcomes, which had never been done. My job was to ask the right questions to the garden’s Executive Director, the Program Manager, and a very hands-on and knowledgeable board member. This was more difficult than I imagined, as the Program Manager’s thinking constantly defaulted to activities. But after an hour, we had our first working draft of outcomes.

Kids & Schools desired outcomes handwritten chart

Using Bob William’s questions about assumptions, I guided them into digging deeper about why they believed these were reasonable outcomes. From there, we worked backwards and after 3 hours, had a very colorful logic model taped to the wall. It is only the beginning of our work, but in the process of making the first draft, something beautiful sprouted. They decided to approach one school and invite them to participate in a whole-school partnership, which we can evaluate in several ways over three to five years. None of us saw that coming, and it is a great idea. My work with this client went from a very small 2-year contract for assessing student learning in a single program to a potentially long-term contract evaluating a new model in science education. Because I don’t hesitate to share that I explore new approaches and bring them to our work together, my short-staffed client trusts they have a real partner – a consultant and evaluator – who looks out for them. It’s a win-win.

Lessons Learned:

Ask the right questions. Then…

Step back. While the team brainstormed, I took notes on big pieces of paper that led to 7 pages of typed minutes.

It can’t all be done in one session. We have more work to do, but we planted many seeds on fertile soil.

Organic is good. If the seeds we planted grow, I will be conducting a longitudinal evaluation on a new model that may have an impact on how educators think about teaching science.

Hot Tips for Independent Evaluators:

Work with organizations and programs that inspire you. Have fun at your job.

It’s OK to start small. You never know what will come of it.

Get out of the way. Your clients are the experts.

Learn as much as you can about as much as you can – and bring it back to your clients.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Melanie Hwalek

Melanie Hwalek

My name is Melanie Hwalek. I have been practicing evaluation for almost 40 years. I’ve always taken for granted my knowledge of social science research design. Recently, I had a profound experience that made me realize how this knowledge can be used to empower voices from the field.

Hot Tip: Respect the power of our social science research knowledge and use it for the greater good.

I learned this lesson from BABESWORLD, a systems approach to healthy living and substance use disorder prevention. BABESWORLD began 40 years ago as BABES, a K-12 puppet-based storytelling curriculum designed to assist young people develop positive living skills through accurate, non-judgmental information about the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs. BABESWORLD’s design emanated from the personal recovery of its designer and hours of storytelling from recovering adults. Decades of stories from BABESWOLD participants illustrate how it has profoundly impacted their lives.

My organization was hired to help BABESWORLD become “evidence-based.” Certification as “evidence based” would qualify BABESWORLD for U.S. federal funding. At the contract kick off meeting, the BABESWORLD CEO asked me to read a chapter in Antoine De Saint-Exupery’s The Little Prince. The Little Prince is a fable written in the 1940s where a little prince travels from his home on a star to visit other stars in the galaxy. On each star he visits there is a parable. The parable the CEO asked me to read was about a star where a Turkish astronomer had identified, for the first time, the little prince’s home. In his turban and robe, the Turkish scientist presented his findings at a galaxy-wide conference of astronomers. Nobody believed him. Then, the king of the Turks mandated that all people dress in European clothes or face death. Ten years hence, the Turkish astronomer made the exact same presentation to the exact same conference of astronomers. This time he was dressed in an elegant European suit. The conference hailed him for his discovery. After I read this story, the CEO said to me, “I need you to dress BABESWORLD in European clothes.”  This was a profound realization to me of how my knowledge of quasi-experimental design could be used to translate what BABESWORLD knew from decades of anecdotal evidence (Turkish) into the language of the U.S. scientific community (European). It humbled me to think about our social science research knowledge as “power,” and that we can use this power to give voice to those in the field.

Rad Resources: To learn about BABESWORLD, please visit: www.babesworld.org

Hazel Symonette describes this translational power as boundary spanning, and the evaluator as boundary spanner. Read Symonette’s chapter on culturally responsive evaluation in Hood et. al’s Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! My name is Norma Martínez-Rubin. As an independent evaluation consultant, I specialize in evaluating nonprofits’ and foundations’ disease prevention and health promotion programs and projects. I’m particularly drawn to initiatives designed to address health, economic, and educational inequities. Because of the complexity associated with such efforts, I’ve been part of multidisciplinary evaluation teams in which, after labored discussions of evaluation approaches and data-collection strategies for our evaluation proposal(s), one of us is tasked with developing a budget to accompany a proposal.

I recall an early attempt where my team lead strongly believed we would increase our chances of obtaining a contract award by positioning ourselves as the lowest bidder. At the time, I didn’t voice my reluctance about that believing that team member to be well experienced in such matters. In retrospect, the low-cost approach was not the defining factor in contract selection. Nor would I want it to be now regardless of which side I occupy at an evaluation proposal reviewers’ table.

What changed for me since I erroneously succumbed to the notion that low-cost evaluation services equal winning contracts, is a continual attempt to align my service offerings to prospective client needs. This requires being certain that my core services —not necessarily different from other evaluators’— are presented along with features to enhance a prospective client’s desire to seek my services.  A greater perception of value is the “value added” to an ordinary services offer. Value-added services are not cheap, low-cost menu items, but extraordinary services to support clients’ business-related reasons for entering into a contract. Among those are activities that save time, provide peace of mind, and increase efficiencies. Developing an evaluation proposal budget with this in mind ties one’s technical knowledge with business savvy. It contributes to the client-evaluator satisfaction of having a proposal that’s fair to both parties. 

Hot Tips:

  • Think of what you are willing to do if presented with certain work conditions e.g., access to decision makers, ready access to evaluation project stakeholders or data, staff availability to negotiate evaluation plans, acceptable distance to evaluation sites, reasonable number of drafts required before finalizing a data presentation.  Note: These are things that, if provided, are likely to prevent or reduce scope creep.
  • Create an outline of your core services i.e., what are the technical skills you can demonstrate and enjoy using while concurrently serving a prospective client’s evaluation needs?
  • Create a list of your “value-added” services i.e. what, additional to your core list of evaluation services, would delight your clients? (Think: what would make your prospective clients’ work lives easier?)
  • Quantify, in time and monetary terms, the cost of your core and value added services.

Lesson Learned:

  • Think of ways to bundle your services so when opportunities exist, you are prepared to describe them to prospective clients.
  • Value-added services may be intangibles, too! Don’t undermine your interpersonal skills and relationship-building abilities. 

Got value-added services? Sure you do! Think: What delights  prospective clients? What delights me?

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello, my name is Kate Clavijo. I earned my degree in Educational Program Evaluation from the University of Louisville in 2002, and have been working as an evaluator ever since. Over the years, I have held full time evaluator positions and worked for non-profits while doing evaluation consulting on the side. About eight years ago, I left a “traditional” evaluation job and became a full-time consultant. In the early days of full time consulting, I budgeted most of my time for drumming up business and networking with potential clients. This was time well spent, but quite isolating and lonely. My breakthrough moment came after attending an AEA conference and realizing what I missed the most was sharing with evaluators. I like to collaborate and talk about evaluation. The first place I turned to when I returned from the conference was the AEA website. Through the AEA “Find an Evaluator” link, I found two people living in my area and sent them an email asking if they wanted to meet for coffee.

The first lived right around the corner. After several coffees and good conversations about evaluation, she asked for help with one of her projects.

I said yes…and when she moved away to greener pastures she passed on what, to this day, is my favorite client.

I reached out to the second person after admiring her website. We have met for coffee and lunch over the years. During our first meeting, she provided me with inspiration, friendship and some excellent resources related to evaluation consulting.

Recently, she asked “Can you help with conducting an interview?”

I said yes…and was exposed first hand to an evaluation of a complex initiative where networks of people and organizations are changing systems in local communities and I saw a very innovative use of graphic presentation.

Lessons Learned:

Reach out to other evaluators. There is no need for an agenda – friendship and talking about evaluation are the immediate rewards.

Say yes. When an evaluator asks for help, just say yes. You never know what you will learn, who you will meet and how it will shape your own evaluation practice.

Rad Resource:

Find an Evaluator is a free searchable online resource provided by the American Evaluation Association. It includes the contact information and area of expertise of hundreds of evaluators across the country and the world. Most people might want to start by searching for evaluators close to home, but you can also search for evaluators working in a specific niche.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hi there!  I am Mary Nash of Nash Insights, based in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. As the country celebrates Independence Day, we at the Independent Consulting TIG are reflecting upon breakthrough moments in our careers. Mine occurred in January while I was in Costa Rica on a Live the Life of Your Dreams Yoga Retreat. After several days of yoga, meditation, journaling, walking on the beach, and discussing how to live the life of my dreams, a thought occurred to me that I had never considered in 20+ years of consulting.  It was time to relocate from my home office.

My home office worked really well for me over the years. I am disciplined enough to separate home from work and had a lot of productive years there. It is well equipped and has a view of the beautiful Berkshire Mountains. I don’t have to pay rent for it and it gave me the flexibility I needed when my children were younger. But I realized that I was getting restless working from home and starting to feel secluded. I needed a change and the time was right to make a move.

Yoga retreat class

Image credit: Bella Retreats

When I returned from Costa Rica, I acted on my epiphany right away. I found office space in a restored industrial building, got to work ordering furniture, sent out 50 postcards announcing the move and reminding people of the services I provide, and within six weeks Nash Insights was in its new home. Being a diligent evaluator, I tallied the results of my intervention and they look pretty good. 

Rad Results:

  • I leave the house every day, even if I don’t have meetings I need to attend.
  • I go out to lunch and for coffee more often with colleagues.
  • I attend more community events.
  • I get more done in less time.
  • I have three new clients.
  • I can invite clients to meet in my office rather than always going to them.
  • Friends and family don’t call me during the day as much “just wanting to chat.”

Author's office

Rad Resources:

  • Yliving was a great source for furnishing my industrial office with a mid-century look.
  • Moo makes really nice oversized luxe postcards out of thick cardboard stock, perfect for announcing that you’ve moved.
  • In search of the perfect office plant, I discovered Plantz.com. They sent me a beautiful Lisa Cane plant, and even featured me on their blog! 

Lessons Learned:

  • Just because you have been doing something for 20+ years doesn’t mean you have to do it forever.
  • Moving into a new office has paid off with higher productivity and an increase in business. And if I still want to work at home occasionally, my home office is still there.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Welcome to Independent Consulting TIG Week on AEA365! I’m Myia Welsh, the 2018 IC TIG Chair and owner of Welsh & Company Evaluation Consulting. Our AEA365 week will focus on the theme: breakthrough moments in independent consulting. Those moments, from tiny to enormous, that had a profound impact on our IC TIG members.

My breakthrough moment came on a rainy spring day in North Central West Virginia. I was filling out paperwork at local bank branch. I was opening a business account.  My hand shook when I filled out the form. Was this for real? This seemed so serious. I had my little folder of business artifacts all ready to go: business license, state LLC paperwork, EIN number. All those other structural aspects of business had happened anti-climactically, in online forms or through the mail. The day I set up my bank account in person, it all felt real in a whole new way. Suddenly an external person was talking to me about my business and it’s needs as if it was a real thing. It was. I was really doing it.

Then I deposited the first check, which felt extra real.

And then tax time came… And the realness continued…

I have never been so proud of paying taxes!

Rad Resource:

I get great satisfaction out of tending to taxes. It’s also something that people who don’t do independent work (but seem to want to) ask me about.  It usually goes something like “I wish I could just do it myself, but then I’d have to figure out taxes.” There’s help for that!

Enjoy our week of independent consultant breakthroughs!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hi, I’m Sara Vaca, independent consultant (www.SaraVaca.com), helping Sheila curate this blog and eventual Saturday contributor.

After 5 years as a freelance evaluator, I am starting to get more contracts coming from previous jobs or mouth-to-ear, but still, I see myself going through the regular selection process: the evaluation commissioners publish the Terms of Reference where they ask you to prepare a methodological proposal, your estimated budget and, in some occasions, they also ask for references from your previous jobs to have more information about how you work. And, if you have gone through that, I don’t know about you, but I’m often embarrassed to disturb my former colleagues or managers (again!) to ask them for references.

Cool Tick: So, I have thought of this idea I haven’t tried out yet, but I thought it could be cool: What if, after each evaluation, I sent the evaluation commissioners and users I’ve worked for a short survey so they can assess my performance (once), so when future potential employees ask for references I could forward them what they have said about my work. I would use some of the typical questions they usually ask in the templates they send so the content is useful for them. Would that work? This could have several advantages: 1) serve me to learn about my performance in a more structured manner, 2) it would allow me to stop asking them for the same favour over the years, and 3) also it could save some time (as often they are busy and the selection/contract process can be delayed until they have the time to answer).

Hot Tip: If we could do that, we would save our references the trouble of being bothered by this, because I also often doubt about whether to reach out to warn them or not: if I do, chances are they are finally not contacted – while if I don’t say anything, they’ll probably get contacted and reach out to say so later.

Rad Resource: There are many resources out there to do quick online survey, but in my case, I would use www.SurveyMonkey.com (that I use quite a lot for other purposes, such as before conducting a workshop, I contact participants to understand their level in the subject and their expectations so I can better customize the survey – but that is another story).

If you want to comment on the idea (whether you think it could be a good fit or not), it would help me to decide whether to try it – and if I do, I would certainly let you know about it later! Thanks 🙂

 

UPDATE: Patricia H. Mueller let me know that AEA posted an evaluation form for members to use with their clients (on principles and an abbreviated one). The principles one should probably be updated to match the newly revised ones. She uses a revised version of the longer form every other year or so with her clients that she finds helpful for constructive feedback and also for marketing purposes.

 

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hi, I’m Sara Vaca, independent consultant (www.SaraVaca.com), AEA365 Outreach Coordinator and Creative Advisor (happy to be back!), and it’s been 4 years and a half since I started my evaluation practice. In that time, I have been involved (to different extent) in about five different partnerships. Belonging or working with a group of consultants (in the form of a partnership or a cooperative) is a great way of collaborating and joining forces with pairs for learning, having access to bigger contracts and sharing experiences – and as a very social individual, I personally love it.

Cool Trick: I am learning as I go but an Evaluation 2016 session on “Designing Independent Consulting Cooperatives” helped me reflect about the dynamics to navigate and tensions to collectively balance when designing and working as a group.Designing Independent Consulting Cooperatives session description from Eval16 mobile app

Hot Tip: I realized it has many similarities with dating!!! LOL

First: sometimes it comes organically after a longer “friendship” relationship; others it is love at first sight (exciting!); on occasion it gives signs of not being a good idea, but you get into it anyway.

Second: you have to get involved and give of yourself in order to make it work. If you have reservations, or you are not convinced to contribute, you will probably never fully commit.

Third: when it works, you feel like you’re in heaven. Life is good, you still have your independence and yet, you belong to something bigger that embraces you and that improves your (professional) life.

Fourth: it is very hard to pretend you are fine if you have minor or major disagreements with your partners. You can try, but eventually resolution through sincere and respectful communication has to happen in order to fix your unsettlement. Otherwise, you will end up breaking up.

Fifth: if eventually it ends up not working out, it slightly breaks your heart and you feel sad.

Rad Resource: I lately use tensiometers more and more (just to visualize the parameters in “tension” that need to be balanced), and during that Evaluation 2016 roundtable organized by Rhonda and Gabrielle, I noted down some of the parameters partners have to agree on in order to be on the same page about the partnership or cooperative they want to build/belong to.

Tensiometer scale Some of them were: whether the relationship between partners is merely professional or personal or both, whether they agree to pay or not contributions, whether they collaborate also in pro bono projects or just contracts, whether they are complementary or colleagues in the same field, the size of the group, how formal is the group and their commitment to it, if all members have equal rights and duties or there are some leaders, and whether they have staff paid by them or not.

Let us know if you have other comments around how to partner to work as a group of independent consultants. Thanks!

 

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello good people! My name is Robert Perez and I am a research assistant at Hamai Consulting and a Data Analyst at Youth Policy Institute.

My first foray into independent consulting happened was when I was offered the opportunity to work at a small consulting company. Admittedly, I was nervous in the beginning but I knew that this was what I wanted to do; and I had an inspiring leader who would later become my unofficial guide through the world of independent consulting. I still have a long way to go.

Lessons Learned:

Find your passion. I spent my college years exploring a variety of topics within the field of Psychology, with particular focus on the research realm. I knew I was interested in the psychological development of youth. I read anything I could get my hands on until I found what I thought was the most interesting topic: Positive Youth Development. Ask yourself all the thoughtful questions. What are you curious about? What are you good at? In what ways could you use your skills to pursue your passion?

Once you’ve identified your passion, find others who share your interests and passions. I’m a bit of an introvert, so connecting with people is not one of my strong suits. Thankfully, I can still connect with people online! Post or respond to questions in your LinkedIn networks or use good ‘ol Facebook to search for groups that revolve around some of your interests.

Begin demonstrating your skill. Consider starting a blog or a vlog (video blog) where you can share your insights, experiences, or interesting tools. Writing a blog can help you refine your writing skills, build professional relationships, and afford you the opportunity to educate others about your field of expertise. Do a search online to find out what other evaluators are writing about see where you can fill in any gaps. Reach out to other bloggers to build relationships!

Rad Resource:

One of the most important pieces of advice that has been shared with me is this: don’t forget to learn about the business side of things. All of the consultants I’ve talked to tell me how important it is to balance my ideals with managing a business. I frequently turn to Consulting And Evaluation With Nonprofit And Community-Based Organizations by Viola and McMahon as a reference. It offers accessible insights about where to begin if you are considering starting a consulting firm with a focus on nonprofits, from developing your fee structures to what kinds of services to provide.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Koolamalsi Njoos (greetings colleagues).  I’m Dr. Nicole Bowman-Farrell, the Founder and President of Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC), a consulting firm located in Wisconsin.  As a traditional Mohican and Lunaape – Munsee (AKA Delaware) Indigenous person, the concept of writing an origin story about BPC is steeped in traditional cultures.  If you know who you are and where you come from then those origin stories help shape how you do business.  BPC started in 2001 as a result of standing my ground professionally, ethically, and morally.

Over five centuries ago, the first Europeans reached Turtle Island.  The Stockbridge Munsee Indians (that is the contemporary name of my Tribal community) lived in the East and in Canada.  We were amongst the first to start an entrepreneurial relationship with the Dutch fur traders in the early 1600’s.  As we were forcibly removed across the country, my community survived. Being resilient problem solvers and smart negotiators transfers well to sustaining a business.

I’m at least the fifth generation of entrepreneurs in the Bowman family.  That’s a picture of my great Grandpa Beaumont Bowman in 1917 who was a contracted logger for many communities in WI.  He’s leading the team, looking sharp, and standing at the top of his game!  Knowing my history is so valuable; it helped sustain my business, where many tough decisions are made.

As a Tribal community, we were always on the move and as a business owner you must never be still.  Adapting to changing resources, political environments, and market needs is key to long term success. There are generations of Bowmans that contributed to our strong family reputation:  hard working, generous and kind, and honest and ethical. These are solid lessons that a business owner needs to live by if they want to be respected, impactful, and sought after as a trusted partner/collaborator.

Hot Tip: Traditional elders tell us that there isn’t “good or bad” there just “is.” In everything that happens, remember to find the lesson in it.  That is good advice for your personal life or your profession.  I enjoy my free subscription to White Bison’s Elder Meditation of the Day (by Don Coyhis, Mohican).

Cool Trick:  Tricksters, in Indigenous storytelling, serve an important purpose to the community.  Sometimes by tricking someone you teach them important lessons.  Check out “Trickster:  Native American Trickster Tales – A Graphic Collection”.

Rad Resource: Indianpreneurship is the fusion of traditional teachings with contemporary sustainable business practices.  It is social entrepreneurship at its best:  evidence based and culturally situated while still making a living and making a true difference in the lives of others.

Lesson Learned:  The toughest times of my business (former employee stole nearly $100,000) taught me the most about myself and my business acumen.  There were a lot of tears and sleepless nights. The relationship of money, emotions, and being a woman played into this life lesson.  My relationship with money, charitable giving, profitability, and sustainability now all co-exist in a balanced and peaceful way with each other.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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