AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | SDGs

Hello, I am Laura Gagliardone. For about twelve years, I have worked for the UN System and NGOs as Program Development and Evaluation, and Communications Specialist; and galvanized the international community on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Relevance: Among all Global Goals, there is one – Goal 5: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment – which we all are called to prioritize as we need women’s support to implement the SDGs by 2030.

Hot Tip: Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable world. When women and girls are provided with equal access to education, health care, decent work, and representation in political and economic decision-making processes, they become empowered and happier colleagues, partners, mothers, sisters, and daughters.

Hot Tip: Question yourself on how women live their life and spend their time daily. Conduct research and analyze Time Use Surveys (TUSs): irregular national surveys conducted to collect information about how people use their time. Find out the areas of women’s employment and evidence on how including them in the labor market would benefit the economy. Prepare recommendations focusing on: paid and unpaid work, program design, policy development, and psychological factors for mentality and behavior changes.

Lessons Learned: In 2015, I have conducted a research and prepared a study on the ‘Women’s Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia, and China’ since time is a direct source of utility, and how people spend it impacts economic growth, gender equality, and sustainable development. Through TUSs, the report presents data which can be utilized as basis for understanding, measuring and monitoring the society over which policies can be formulated, assessed, and modified. In India, the findings show that women’s work is often scattered, sporadic, and poorly diversified, and they spend long hours on unpaid work. Therefore it is recommendable to (1) reduce and redistribute unpaid work by providing infrastructures and services; (2) design programs to improve women’s skills and enable them to access better jobs and enter new sectors as wage earners and entrepreneurs; and (3) design policies to improve the management of natural resources. In Indonesia, the lessons learned suggest that (4) mentality and behavior changes are to be encouraged and promoted. Women are meaningfully engaged in all three areas of work (productive, reproductive and community) and the opportunity for additional economic interventions targeted to them has great economic and social transformative potential. In China, there has been a reduction of poverty incidence and the private sector, through job creation and income generation, has assisted this process, while support within families and strong work ethics have made further invaluable contributions. Yet, women’s poverty still exists and is chronic in some rural areas.

Report available through EmpowerWomen.org (funded by the Government of Canada and facilitated by UN Women): Women’s Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia, and China.

Women's Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia and China

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi all, I’m Julie Peachey, Director of Poverty Measurement at Innovations for Poverty Action where I oversee a widely-used tool called the Poverty Probability Index (PPI).  It’s no surprise to me that the first Sustainable Development Goal is “End Poverty in all its forms everywhere’’ as so much of our international development work is designed with this objective in mind.  But how does an organization – social enterprise, NGO, corporation, impact investor – understand and report its contribution to this goal?no poverty

The first two indicators (1.1.1 and 1.1.2) for measuring progress against targets for SDG1 are the proportion of the population living below the international extreme poverty line (currently $1.90/ per person per day in 2011 PPP dollars) and the national poverty line.  So, an organization providing affordable access to goods, services and livelihood opportunities for this population or including them in their value chain as producers and entrepreneurs can simply report the percentage of its customers or beneficiaries that are below these two poverty lines.  But wait….simply….you say?  Getting household-level information on poverty / consumption / income / wealth is notoriously hard in developing countries.

Hot Tip:

Use the PPI.  It is a statistically rigorous yet inexpensive and easy-to-administer poverty measurement tool. The PPI is country specific, derived from national surveys, and uses ten questions and an intuitive scoring system. The PPI measures the likelihood that the respondent’s household is living below the poverty line, and is calibrated to both national and international poverty lines. There are PPIs for 60 countries and it is available for free download at www.povertyindex.org.

Zambia 2015 PPI User Guide

 

The PPI provides a measure of poverty that is both objective and standard – not particular to an area or country or sector.  This means that organizations and investors can compare the inclusiveness of their projects and programs within and across countries, and across sectors.

The PPI can be useful in reporting against other SDGs as well, especially those that are focused on inclusive access to services and markets, as well as those that aim to reduce inequality and engender inclusive growth.   Understanding whether initiatives are reaching the poorest and most vulnerable is integral to our collective progress against these targets.

Rad Resources: 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Shawna Hoffman here, from The Rockefeller Foundation’s M&E team.  At Evaluation 2017– which will focus on Learning to Action – I’ll be chairing a multipaper session that will explore challenges and opportunities evaluating diverse programs in different countries in Africa.  The upcoming session got me reflecting on the recent conference of our peer association, African Evaluation Association (AfrEA), and on priorities for evaluators working in Africa more broadly.

In March, evaluators from across Africa and the globe gathered in Uganda for the 8th AfrEA conference.  The theme of this year’s conference was the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a focus on how to hold stakeholders accountable for delivering on – and generating evaluative evidence about – the SDGs.

The 17 goals which constitute the SDGs are by their nature both ambitious and broad – tackling issues ranging from gender equality and health to infrastructure and climate change.  By 2030, governments have committed to reaching 169 specific targets such as “reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions…” And “progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average.”

Over the next 13 years in the lead up to 2030, evaluators have an important role to play in supporting national governments to integrate the SDGs into their development agendas, and holding them accountable for meaningful, demonstrable results.

Drawing on cases from across Africa, the presenters in our multipaper panel will share their experiences translating learning into action in support of achievement of the SDGs. The session will explore topics such as how evaluators navigate complex relationships between program implementers, funders and external evaluators, drawing on a case from a child labor prevention program in Mozambique. We will also hear about the results of evaluations of governance, education, and health interventions in Liberia, Ethiopia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. Finally, one panelist will share recent research on how “leadership” is conceptualized and evaluated by Southern leaders, based on a case study conducted in East Africa.

Eastern Cape, South Africa. ©Anna Haines 2016 www.annahaines.org

Hot Tip: Join Maria DiFuccia, Kate Marple-Cantell, Fozya Tesfa Adem, Soumya Alva, Emma Fieldhouse, and other colleagues at Evaluation 2017 on Wednesday November 8, 4:30-6pm (Session ICCE6) for what promises to be a great discussion!

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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