AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | GEDI

Peace! My name is Dr. Monique Liston and I am a GEDI alum. I enjoyed every minute of my internship year and consider my cohort close friends in the professional and academic world. GEDI exposed me to evaluation as a profession. While I felt like I lacked evaluator skills because of the limitations of my graduate program, the GEDI program connected me to resources to help me increase my own capacity. The mentorship provided by the GEDI program leadership helped me to define myself as a professional, focused on racial justice and liberation, within the field of evaluation. Since I graduated from the program, I have applied the things that I have learned to continue my personal and professional development. Here are two HOT TIPS I have for new evaluators / new GEDI that I gained from my experience in the program.
Hot Tip 1: Follow up with anyone and everyone. I know that many people who know me would not believe that I was shy, but I am. GEDI programs put me in close contact with the heavy hitters in the evaluation field. While many members of my cohort had strong small-talk game, I often felt like I was missing out because my anxiety around meeting people kept me quiet in many social situations with people who’s work I had admired. I opted however to make sure that I emailed after being in those spaces. A short – I saw you at X place. I appreciated that you said Y. I am working on Z. – note went a long way. I was able to develop relationships in a way that was comfortable and affirming for me. In addition, many people do not follow up, so following up in general helps you to stand out in a crowd! I also made new friends in the field from across the country.
Hot Tip 2: Read. Read. Read. There is no shortage of evaluation literature, but the more you read, the more opportunities that you have to connect your experiences to the reflections of others. When I was in the program, I was overwhelmed because I felt that others who came from schools with intense evaluation programs were constantly inundating the conversation with theorists and frameworks that I had not been exposed to. Now that I am well-versed in evaluation literature I cannot get enough of it! The GEDI program is an excellent opportunity to find the literature that interests you and even connect to the key authors in that area!
Rad Resources:
For my work, bridging racial justice and culturally responsive evaluation was key. Here are two readings that helped:
McDermott, C. M., & O’Connor, G. C. (2002). Managing radical innovation: an overview of emergent strategy issuesJournal of product innovation management19(6), 424-43

·

Greetings from Los Angeles! I am AEA member and former GEDI Program Co-Director Ashaki M. Jackson, MFA, Ph.D. with a few notes on firming fellowships designed to increase the number of new, competent evaluators who begin their formal training during graduate studies.

During the six years that the Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program has been in Claremont Graduate University’s care, we began each year with fundamental courses to launch graduate students on their 9-month immersion. Our goals with each cohort were to provide a sufficient introduction to evaluation theory and practice with a focus on culturally responsive methods; support scholars as they navigated an evaluation internship; make connections between classroom and field learning; link scholars with theorists, mentors and practitioners with sustained curiosity in the field; and help scholars create a useful set of products to begin a career portfolio. In sum, we wanted to engender enthusiasm for the field while infusing culturally responsive evaluation across the landscape.

We were equipped with what we needed (a library of publications; supportive AEA community members; funding to send scholars to annual meetings, conferences and seminars; etc.), but what more could we use? What does any evaluation training program need to successfully onboard and retain scholars to the evaluation pipeline?

Academic Credit Options. Scholars, who are in the last years of their masters and doctoral programs, complete fundamental coursework (offered by both the Claremont Evaluation Center and AEA) during the program year. Paths for academic credit can boost scholars’ portfolios and formally recognize AEA-based training.

Extended AEA Membership. Scholars’ memberships are sponsored or subsidized for the program year, however funding is steep the year following. Waived membership would ease scholars into continued AEA participation.

Paths into AEA. Ongoing ties to the association could be useful to program alumni’s growth in evaluation. Purposefully selected roles as executive board support, annual meeting design support, volunteer readers for association publications and the like can further root scholars in evaluative thinking and citizenship. HOT TIP: AEA topical interest groups are a great way to explore evaluation, build networks and stay abreast of new developments in the field.

As the program transitions to a capable George Mason University team, we offer these tools for program scholars and alumni:

Rad Resources: Visit Southern California!

Claremont Evaluation Center Professional Development Workshops in Evaluation

Keep learning!

We are big fans of the University of Illinois’s Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment and its conference, founded by AEA members.

Root!
Join a AEA Topical Interest Group.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Greetings from alumnae of the GEDI cohort, Ohana. We are Yamelith Aguilar, MPH, and Tiffinie Jana’e Cobb, MPH. Today’s notes are based on our reflections on incorporating culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) in multiple evaluation phases.

CRE is a growing movement in the evaluation field that demands our attention to the complex cultural context in play. CRE gives a promising approach to be authentic in community partnerships. As Public Health Evaluators we have witnessed evaluation’s impact on our most vulnerable communities and want to share practical tips on the use of CRE to strengthen relationships between evaluators and communities.

Hot Tip 1: Give everyone impacted a voice.
In addition to inviting the usual suspects to the planning process, find ways to include service recipients to share their opinions and priorities as to what defines a successful program.

Hot Tip 2: Be sure to design activities to capture input across the organizational structure.
A finding from a focus group experience demonstrated the importance of using methods that prioritize equity in feedback. All participants agreed with the CEO’s statements during a discussion. A staff waited until the discussion was over to privately express a different opinion. Activities with non-verbal methods were helpful thereafter for all participants to contribute.

Hot Tip 3: Ensure that your reports are accessible and culturally appropriate
Instead of 100-page evaluation reports, we strive to create reports that are easily digestible and WILL be fully read! Incorporating CRE into reporting and dissemination requires that the evaluation team fully understand all relevant stakeholders’ needs, including persons the program aims to reach.

Hot Tip 4: Ask stakeholders what they want to see.
During the planning phase, ask stakeholders what outcomes would be most useful to them. This will help prepare and guide the evaluation team as they begin designing. Some additional issues to consider during the design include: languages of all stakeholders, level of education, and representative images used throughout the report.

Rad Resources: To better engage stakeholders in your evaluation outcomes, design accessible and culturally appropriate infographics. Excellent free sites include: Canva or Piktochart.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

·

Warm wishes from wonderful Wisconsin! I’m Kimberly Kile, Project Manager for the LEAD Center, housed within WCER at the University of Wisconsin. The LEAD Center is comprised of professional staff who conduct program evaluation within and about higher education both locally and nationally. I had the opportunity to take a leading role in developing our center as a host site for an intern through the American Evaluation Association’s Graduate Education Diversity Internship (AEA GEDI) program. This post will share some hot tips and lessons learned in becoming a host site.

The host site information on the AEA GEDI website identifies the site’s responsibilities, as well as the roles of the intern’s mentor. Once we reviewed these materials and knew that we were able to meet these expectations, we moved forward with the application.

Concurrently, we identified a potential project for the intern to work on. It was important to us to have a project that could be started and completed within the internship timeline (Sept through June). We also wanted the intern to see the entire process of an evaluation project, from the planning stages through an end product.

Hot Tip:

Consider finding a partner or project to share the cost of hosting an intern. In our case, our center paid the GEDI’s salary and benefits, while the project paid for the GEDI’s professional development expenses. Be sure to work closely with your financial folks to work out all the payment details.

Hot Tip:

Because of the tight timeline, in our case, we included a note in the application that funding for the position was still pending. There is no financial obligation unless you select an intern.

Lesson Learned:

AEA reviews the applications and then forwards potential GEDI applicants to each host site. Because travel can be a significant financial burden to graduate students, we offered interviews both in-person and via Skype.

Lesson Learned:

The interview window is set by the GEDI program so the sites have little flexibility related to the interview schedule. We blocked a couple of half-days within the interview window to be sure all interviewers could participate. This occurs in summer and vacations can conflict with interviews. If you partner with someone to share the cost (like we did), be sure to invite the partner to participate in the interviews. We also blocked an hour or so of time after all the interviews, so that all interviewers could discuss the applicants and everyone could make a decision together.

The LEAD Center had a delightful experience as an AEA GEDI host site. The GEDI at our site brought fresh ideas to our staff. We would highly recommend others consider hosting an AEA GEDI!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating The Wisconsin Idea in Action Week coordinated by the LEAD Center. The LEAD (Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination) Center is housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the School of EducationUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison and advances the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from student and adult evaluators living in and practicing evaluation from the state of WI. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Throughout the course of our GEDI experience, we have been immersed in cultural competence and culturally responsive evaluation. We learned the fundamentals of cultural competence in seminars at Claremont Graduate University and explored the prevalence of culturally responsive evaluation topics at AEA’s annual meeting. The unique opportunity of being able to observe the work of teams at our intern sites provided an especially useful experience of what it is like to not only practice culturally responsive evaluation, but also how to work within settings that are new to evaluation practice. While the knowledge we gained through our GEDI trainings was beneficial in preparing us for our sites, our experiences working within groups that were not accustomed to evaluation, or culturally responsive evaluation more specifically, gave us a unique opportunity to practice our newly acquired knowledge.

Lessons Learned from our GEDI Site Experiences:

Working on a team can be challenging when balancing multiple personalities and working styles to reach a common goal or deliverable. This can be particularly challenging when working on an evaluation project because often the teams include members external to your organization (clients, external partners, beneficiaries). Cultural competence, as we have observed, emanates from clear communication among evaluation team members and working within existing organizational structures to incorporate culturally competent evaluation practice. Some ways that the teams we have observed have navigated cultural competence were:

  • Embedded culturally responsive practices within the team’s regular protocol – Evaluation teams that work with many external clients tend to have routine processes for carrying out their scope of work from start to finish. When culturally responsive practices are embedded into these routines, it makes them necessary for all members of the team to consider and complete. It also helps to guarantee that even those who might not be coming to the table with a background in cultural competence can learn and become more familiar with its use.
  • For groups or organizations working with clients who are unfamiliar with evaluation practice – Evaluation can be a scary word to many individuals and organizations. An awareness of an organization’s comfort with and knowledge of evaluation is necessary prior to implementing an evaluation plan. This requires that evaluators practice culturally competent evaluation not only for projects as they pertain to their clients, but also interpersonally when working internally or externally as an evaluator.

Rad Resource:

An excellent resource for those looking for best practices for culturally competent evaluation work comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Practical Strategies for Culturally Competent Evaluation. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2014.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

·

Hello, we are Dani Rae Gorman and Angela Nancy Mendoza, former scholars of the AEA Graduate Diversity Education Internship (GEDI) program 2015-2016 cohort. We’d like to share some of our lessons learned throughout the program in engaging stakeholders from the inception and throughout the process of evaluation.

Lessons Learned:

Consistent Engagement

Evaluation phases change over a project’s life, and it is important to include stakeholders at each step. In many cases, stakeholders help to plan what they want, but are less involved with tasks such as helping to understand what the data mean and assisting in creating an effective way to communicate these findings. Having the right people involved from the beginning and keeping them involved throughout the evaluation are critical to the process. It increases the evaluation’s accuracy, appropriateness and utility. For example, having evaluation stakeholders involved in the interpretation of results to ensure the evaluators are getting the right message and are aware of important nuances.

Creating Value and Utility

In conducting relevant and accurate evaluations, it is important to understand the cultural context and communities in which the evaluation is to be carried out. Consideration and responsiveness to these factors help to ensure that an evaluation captures nuances and specific needs to help create an evaluation product that is accurate and useful to stakeholders.

Identifying and Engaging a Diversity of Stakeholders

Engaging stakeholders requires the identification of those whom the evaluation will impact. This includes program staff, managers, project leaders, clients, community members, and other stakeholders who may be affected by the evaluation findings. Engaging a diversity of stakeholders aides in creating an understanding of the identity being evaluated, its members and its culture. This in turn helps to ensure that informative questions are asked in the right way and that the outcomes are meaningful and useful to stakeholders.

Hot Tip:

Be patient and flexible in working to engage stakeholders through the evaluation process. It can be a challenge to facilitate engagement throughout the stages of an evaluation and individuals may have different experiences, perspectives, and responsibilities, but consistent engagement can create added value and utility of evaluation findings.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

We are Dominic Combs and Marques Hogan, scholars of the GEDI program’s 13th cohort. Through professional development, conferences, mentoring and internships in organizations that value culturally responsive evaluation, the GEDI program makes space for scholars to learn and practice. Further, the yearlong experience encourages scholars to challenge their capacities and pursue careers that we previously did not consider. We’d like to share with the AEA community a few lessons learned that helped us to grow beyond novice evaluator into responsive roles. 

Lessons Learned:

  1. Positionality & Self-Reflection: Understanding personal biases before, during and after evaluation work is an intricate component of culturally responsive evaluation. As interns it was important for us to carefully monitor our positionality and understand the intersections of self-to-self, self-to-others, and self-to-systems (Symonette, 2009) as our work engaged stakeholders from various communities and schools across the United States. Self-reflection allowed us to recognize and address our positionalities’ impact on the work.
  2. Inclusiveness: Evaluators can make space for all stakeholders to be seen and heard at multiple points in the evaluation (i.e., learning & engaging stakeholders, data collection and interpretation, and disseminating results). This allows communities to contribute input to shape evaluations that are uniquely meaningful to their needs. Evaluators can always advocate against a one-size fits all approach.
  3. Evaluator Characteristics: In a program workshop, GEDI program co-founder Dr. Hazel Symonette shared that “good evaluators should be open to new ideas, light on their feet, learning centered and responsive.” Each stakeholder possessed their own wants, needs, and levels of expertise, therefore being able to communicate effectively at each level allows for increased validity in evaluation with clear, specific, and obtainable objectives.

Rad Resources:

Dr. Symonette’s work allows professionals to examine what they bring to an evaluation (information, perceptions and biases) and how professionals see themselves at different points in an evaluation. We found these resources particularly helpful:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

We are alumna of the AEA’s Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program’s 13th cohort. Today’s hot tips are reflections on the importance of increasing an organization’s capacity to conduct equitable evaluations across all the stages of an evaluation. Here, we will share three tips that we learned while working at our GEDI sites.

Hot Tip #1 (Leah, Doctoral Student at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign): Develop and utilize critical consciousness to fill the gaps. At my GEDI site, diversity, inclusion and engagement are prioritized in the organization. In developing a measure to capture progress toward this goal, we realized that peer-reviewed research supporting equitable and culturally responsive measures are limited. Most research focuses on staff diversity and work culture but does not account for the various ways spaces can be meaningfully diverse or how people can be included and engaged. One way to address the gap is by increasing critical consciousness, explained by Paulo Freire as “the ability to perceive social, political, and economic oppression and to take action against the oppressive elements of society.” We can then critically analyze the cultural validity of our instruments.

Hot Tip #2 (Monique, Doctoral Candidate at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee): Make sure reflection is the center of culturally responsive evaluation. During my GEDI experience, I worked with organizations addressing population health outcomes in historically marginalized communities. Following trainings debriefing with program leadership, we concluded that program staff and leadership needed a better understanding of how important reflection is to the culturally responsive evaluation framework. With my site supervisor we conducted a presentation called Tools You Can Use: Program Evaluation for a state foundation’s annual grantee forum. I revised the framework presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Dr. Rodney Hopson on AEA365 to develop The Reflective Flower. This graphic, shown below, centers reflection on the part of the evaluator and key stakeholders. Print this graphic as a reminder to your team and stakeholders of HOW TO BLOOM USING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE EVALUATION.

reflection-flower

Hot Tip #3 (Ibukun, Doctoral Student at Cornell University): Leaders should explicitly commit to culturally responsive evaluation. At my GEDI site, health equity is the organization’s main mission. To assess the organization’s impact on health equity in the community, it is crucial that leaders stay reflective and knowledgeable on health-specific culturally responsive evaluation. The foundation can influence health equity through setting grant project requirements. It is not enough for organizations’ stances and staff members to be committed to CRE; the leaders must also be supportive of these efforts. Ultimately, foundations’ leaders have the unique ability to tackle these issues through their grant-making, as they hold positions of power and have the potential to influence systemic change.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

·

Hello, my name is Kenneth Pass. I am a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Northwestern University and a recent Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program alumnus. During my GEDI internship at Growth Capital Network in Ann Arbor, Michigan, I engaged in various health, evaluation, and philanthropic projects with state and local community organizations. Throughout this internship I have learned important lessons on community-centered frameworks, diverse health programs throughout the state, proposal and grant evaluation, and metric and other measurement development.

Lessons Learned:

  1. Know who is speaking and who is contributing to that voice. When working with state and local community organizations that are submitting grant proposals to philanthropic and other funding organizations, it is important to know about the applicant and the community they serve, and what major partners and stakeholders are involved. This information ensures that you are able to understand the organization and what role it plays and if it is community centered in that role.
  1. Take stock of evaluation capacity and investment. Often I observed that applicants either did not have the capacity to develop and implement an evaluation or prioritize program evaluation. This was an important moment for me – and the applicants. Their lack of evaluation capacities or investment limited how they approached and understood the benefits of program evaluation. Being able to assess an applicant’s capacity and investment in evaluation and provide feedback on the meaning, significance, and benefits of evaluation is essential to helping improve community health, as well as working relationships with philanthropic and other funding organizations.
  1. Encourage potential grantees to think about disparities within communities. While evaluating applicant proposals, I considered Lessons 1 and 2. I thought more critically about how minority groups would benefit from proposed health programs and initiatives and how communities were being engaged throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of these health programs. Applicants’ programs often involved marginalized or underserved sections of their communities so understanding how proposals addressed gender and racial/ethnic health disparities was key. Given the health burdens that women and people of color carry throughout Michigan and the United States, encouraging state and local community organizations to pay attention to the health disparities present in their communities is crucial to increasing the benefit and scope of any health program.

Through the GEDI internship, I learned more not only about health, evaluation, and philanthropy but also about the importance of discovering, valuing, and centering community voices in program evaluation.

Rad Resources:

  1. Template for Analyzing Philanthropic Programs Through a Culturally Responsive and Racial Equity Lens
  2. Advancing Evaluation Practices in Philanthropy by Aspen Institute Program on Philanthropy and Social Innovation

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

Greetings from Los Angeles! We are Drs. Ashaki M. Jackson and Stewart Donaldson – the AEA Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program leadership team. This week, we share with you reflections from our most recent alumni, fondly called District 13 in honor of our 13th cohort.

During last year’s annual conference, GEDI scholars were charged with learning how attendees defined culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) and how it emerged in practitioners’ work, if at all. When asked to what extent CRE was important to practitioners’ work, a respondent answered, “don’t care.” It ignited scholars to reflect on where culture exists and the possibility that evaluation can be conducted without attention to culture. Their reflections yielded a new understanding of culture’s omnipresence in our selves (beliefs, values, religious practices, race and ethnicity), work (colleagues, stakeholders, funders and politics that shape our grant opportunities), environments (where we live, where we work) and even our funders’ missions. Culture is inextricable, and that matters.

The GEDI program sharpens scholars’ attention to culture and its impact on evaluation quality, validity and meaningfulness. It is a pipeline to the evaluation field. We train masters and doctoral students of color who reflect many of the new communities in which evaluations occur. The program introduces evaluative thinking in scholars from variety of disciplines and is centered on the principles of culturally responsive evaluation. Scholars participate in a yearlong internship while receiving mentoring from leadership, AEA theorists and practitioners, and internship site supervisors. Scholars also complete professional development courses, including those offered through Claremont Evaluation Center’s (CEC) annual workshops and the association’s annual conference; complete monthly webinars with established theorists and practitioners; and fulfill written group and individual deliverables to practice conveying findings to different audiences.

Hot Tip: Evaluative thinking and evaluation skills are widely practical. We invite graduate students across all fields who are interested in exploring and practicing cultural competence in evaluation, are from historically under-represented communities, and are at an institution where evaluation coursework is limited or absent to apply. AEA distributes a call each spring. Please share this opportunity widely.

Hot Tip: The program is fueled by partnerships with organizations that can provide evaluation opportunities for our scholars. Site supervisors provide our scholars practical professional experience and space in which to apply their program learning. We enthusiastically welcome applications from organizations. Previous host sites have missions centered on education, health, policy, environment, micro-loans, volunteerism and social services. If you are interested in working with the program and helping shape the next generation of evaluators, please contact us at gedi@eval.org, or watch for the Call for Applications that we distribute in early spring (prior to our call for scholar applications).

Rad Resources
CEC Professional Development Workshop Series

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

Older posts >>

Archives

To top