AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | diversity

Hello community of evaluators. I’m Salima Bhimani, Founder and Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Relational. Relational offers research and evaluation and consulting and education services to organizations, companies and institutions. My focus as an evaluator and researcher over the last two decades have been on addressing bias, discrimination and barriers faced by marginalized people in communities and institutions. Here I share the centrality of getting underneath the language of diversity so that evaluations can reveal how social inequities are designed into institutions and operate within them. 

Case for consideration: Recently I conducted an evaluation for a higher education Institution. They wanted to understand how to make their curriculum and pedagogies more accessible to the linguistic, gender, racial, ethnic and economic diverse constituencies they serve in more than 10 countries. These constituencies all fall under the same religious community. The institution already had a conceptualization of accessibility. Their understanding foregrounded that everyone should be able to obtain their resources and relate to them.  It was clear to me that their approach to accessibility was intimately connected to how they thought about what diversity means. In this circumstance, their benign conception of diversity was obscuring the connection between the social subjectivities of their constituencies and their relative power, voice and positioning in relation to their institution and the broader community.  That is, there was no analysis of the historical and contemporary dynamics of unequal relations between their constituencies that were implicitly and explicitly defining the curricular content and pedagogical approaches. What was required is an awareness of how their approaches and content were already shaped for those unquestionably thought to be the norm.

Hot Tip: Break open taken for granted notions of diversity

  • A benign concept of diversity flattens difference. It undermines and diminishes histories and cultural forces that design inequities within institutions and which relationally shape individual and group identities, positions, interests and needs
  • A more critical conception of diversity understands how people and their experiences are socially and politically constituted in relation to each other, even within a community with a shared identity
  • Such analysis is foundational to a more nuanced conceptualization of what the curriculum and pedagogies need to be and for whom
  • Accessibility then is directly entangled with social realities and the biases, barriers, and inequities experienced differently within social minority groups
  • Accessibility must be framed with a clear view of how social markers of difference intersect to inform experiences of access

Rad Resources:

As I have written before diversity is often used as a ‘safer’ concept within institutions. Yet, those researchers that have examined the limits of diversity as an institutional marker, make an incredibly strong case for why we should understand the function of its uses. We need be cautious and as evaluators ask whether the use of diversity in fact undermines goals towards equity and social justice.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Labor Day Week in Evaluation: Honoring the WORK of evaluation. The contributions this week are tributes to the behind the scenes and often underappreciated work evaluators do. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Greetings and welcome from the Disabilities and Underrepresented Populations TIG week.  We are June Gothberg, Chair and Caitlyn Bukaty, Program Chair.  This week we have a strong line up of great resources, tips, and lessons learned for engaging typically underrepresented population in evaluation efforts.

You might have noticed that we changed our name from Disabilities and Other Vulnerable Populations to Disabilities and Underrepresented Populations and may be wondering why.  It came to our attention during 2016 that sever of our members felt our previous name was inappropriate and had the potential to be offensive.  Historically, a little under 50% of our TIGs presentations represent people with disabilities, the rest are a diverse group ranging from migrants to teen parents.  The following Wordle shows the categorical information of presentations our TIGs presentation

Categories represented by the Disabilities and Underrepresented Populations presentations from 1989-2016

TIG members felt that the use of vulnerable in our name set up a negative and in some cases offensive label to the populations we represent.  Thus, after discussion, communications, and coming to consensus we proposed to the AEA board that our name be changed to Disabilities and Underrepresented Populations.

Lessons Learned:

  • Words are important! Labels are even more important!
  • Words can hurt or empower, it’s up to you.
  • Language affects attitudes and attitudes affect actions.

Hot Tips:

  • If we are to be effective evaluators we need to pay attention to the words we use in written and verbal communication.
  • Always put people first, labels last. For example, student with a disability, man with autism, woman with dyslexia.

The nearly yearlong name change process reminded of the lengthy campaign to rid federal policy and documents of the R-word.  If you happened to miss the Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign, there are several great video and other resources at r-word.org.

High School YouTube video

YouTube Video – Spread the Word to End the Word

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTGo_dp_S-k&feature=youtu.be

Bill S. 2781 put into federal law, Rosa’s Law, which takes its name and inspiration for 9-year-old Rosa Marcellino, removes the terms “mental retardation” and “mentally retarded” from federal health, education and labor policy and replaces them with people first language “individual with an intellectual disability” and “intellectual disability.” The signing of Rosa’s Law is a significant milestone in establishing dignity, inclusion and respect for all people with intellectual disabilities.

So, what’s in a name?  Maybe more than you think!

 

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Hello community of evaluators. I’m Salima Bhimani, Founder and Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Relational. Relational offers research and evaluation and consulting and education services to organizations, companies and institutions. My focus as an evaluator and researcher over the last two decades have been on addressing bias, discrimination and barriers faced by marginalized people in communities and institutions. Here I share the centrality of getting underneath the language of diversity so that evaluations can reveal how social inequities are designed into institutions and operate within them. 

Case for consideration:

Recently I conducted an evaluation for a higher education institution. They wanted to understand how to make their curriculum and pedagogies more accessible to the linguistic, gender, racial, ethnic and economic diverse constituencies they serve in more than 10 countries. These constituencies all fall under the same religious community. The institution already had a conceptualization of accessibility. Their understanding foregrounded that everyone should be able to obtain their resources and relate to them.  It was clear to me that their approach to accessibility was intimately connected to how they thought about what diversity means. In this circumstance, their benign conception of diversity was obscuring the connection between the social subjectivities of their constituencies and their relative power, voice and positioning in relation to their institution and the broader community.  That is, there was no analysis of the historical and contemporary dynamics of unequal relations between their constituencies that were implicitly and explicitly defining the curricular content and pedagogical approaches. What was required is an awareness of how their approaches and content were already shaped for those unquestionably thought to be the norm.

Hot Tip: Break open taken for granted notions of diversity

  • A benign concept of diversity flattens difference. It undermines and diminishes histories and cultural forces that design inequities within institutions and which relationally shape individual and group identities, positions, interests and needs
  • A more critical conception of diversity understands how people and their experiences are socially and politically constituted in relation to each other, even within a community with a shared identity
  • Such analysis is foundational to a more nuanced conceptualization of what the curriculum and pedagogies need to be and for whom
  • Accessibility then is directly entangled with social realities and the biases, barriers, and inequities experienced differently within social minority groups
  • Accessibility must be framed with a clear view of how social markers of difference intersect to inform experiences of access

Rad Resources:

As I have written before diversity is often used as a ‘safer’ concept within institutions. Yet, those researchers that have examined the limits of diversity as an institutional marker, make an incredibly strong case for why we should understand the function of its uses. We need be cautious and as evaluators ask whether the use of diversity in fact undermines goals towards equity and social justice.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

I am Ravan Charles, an evaluation newbie from Omaha, Nebraska. I’m writing about how my personal experience at the 2015 Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI) Spring Training will influence the way I do evaluation for the rest of my life.

I have to admit, I was skeptical when I saw the conference theme – ‘Social Justice Amidst Standards and Accountability: The Challenge for Evaluation’ with an emphasis on cultural competence. It is probably important to note that I am a black woman. I grew up in a world where cultural competence was for white people. Cultural competence meant the white lady facilitating my all-black tween girls’ group was able to code-switch fluently, or my sociology professor making sure to call on me whenever we talked about race in class (every day, it was a long semester). My perception was that cultural competency was something that white people were trained to be good at (by other white people).

When I walked into the conference, I instinctively scanned the room for other black and brown faces. I saw one… two… seven…. I lost count. Of the many trainings, conferences, and college classes that I have attended in my life this was the very first where I felt that there was adequate people-of-color representation. I had never realized how important racial diversity is to me until my need for it was satisfied. Once it was, I was able to notice and more deeply appreciate other types of diversity in the rooms. Furthermore, I was able to become more actively engaged and take ownership of the training.

Lesson Learned: When I was able to see myself across the room, in the lunch line, and even at the podium I no longer felt like a spectator. I realized that being culturally competent is about continuously learning from, sharing, and honoring our differences and using that knowledge to create things together. That is just as valuable to me as anyone else. Seeing myself in the room allowed me to see myself as an evaluator, and as someone who wants to be a good one.

I plan to use this experience inform my future work. For me, being culturally competent will mean that I not only strive to interact effectively with clients, I will also work at ensuring that every individual that participates will be able to see their self in every part of the work. My hope is that if every participant feels well-represented throughout they will feel the same sense of ownership and engagement I felt at MESI.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating MESI Spring Training Week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from evaluators who presented at or attended the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute Spring Training. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Ray Kennard Haynes and I am an Assistant Professor at Indiana University- Bloomington and I have a keen interest domestic racial Diversity in Higher Education (HE).   Since the 1970s the United States (U.S.) has attempted to address Diversity by focusing primarily on race and gender through Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) legislation. This legislation produced some gains; however, those gains have now eroded and are under threat due to legal challenges.

HE institutions in the US have ostensibly embraced Diversity and even claim to manage it. Evidence of this commitment to diversity can be seen in the proliferation of Diversity offices and programs at HE institutions and with the advent of the position of Chief Diversity Officer (CDO). The casual observer could reasonably conclude that Diversity has been achieved in HE. Surely, we see evidence of this reality with the CDO position and ubiquitous Diversity commitment statements. Note too, that the term university can also be construed as: the many and different in one place. Given this meaning and the fact that one in every two U.S. residents will be non-white by the year 2050, Diversity in higher education is a fait accompli. Is HE really diverse with respect domestic racial groups (i.e. African-Americans and Latino-Americans)?

Hot Tips: Research suggests that despite increasing racial diversity, communities and schools are re-segregating to levels representative of the 1960s. In highly selective institutions, diversity has come to mean many things and underrepresented domestic students and faculty are becoming an increasingly smaller part of the Diversity calculus. The evidence suggests HE is becoming less domestically diverse because of the negative co-variation between increases in domestic racial diversity and decreasing access for African-Americans and Latino-Americans to higher education, especially at highly selective schools.

One way for HE to show its commitment to domestic Diversity is to define and evaluate it within the broader construct of DIVERSITY that includes visible and non-visible differences.

Evaluation checklists can be applied to assess domestic diversity deficits and related program implementation thoroughness.

For HE institutions and evaluators who believe that domestic diversity matters, a good place to start is to create Domestic Diversity Evaluation Checklists that assess for both Diversity and Inclusion. These checklists should include dimensions that capture:

  • Diversity investment: the budget (investment) associated with domestic racial diversity
  • Structural diversity: the numbers of underrepresented domestic students and faculty
  • Diversity Climate: decision making and the level of meaningful cross-race interaction and inclusion in shaping the culture and direction of the HE institution

Rad Resources: For practical help on checklists you may access, see Western Michigan University’s page on evaluation checklists and some examples of evaluation checklists.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Multiethnic Issues in Evaluation (MIE) Week with our colleagues in the MIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from MIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello and Hola. We’re Nnenia Campbell, research assistant at the Natural Hazards Center, University of Colorado Boulder and Saúl Maldonado, research assistant at the ELLISA Project, University of California, Santa Cruz. We are recent graduates of the AEA Graduate Diversity Education Internship (GEDI). One of the GEDI goals is to: “Deepen the evaluation profession’s capacity to work in racially, ethnically and culturally diverse settings.” In the first of this two-part series, we shared a few suggestions for amplifying definitions of diversity. In this second-part, we share a few of the lessons we’ve learned that frame diversity as a measure of validity in culturally responsive evaluation.

Diversity informs validity. Cultural responsiveness is a critical feature of the evaluation process and increases the utility and truthfulness of results (Frierson, Hood & Hughes, 2002). Practicing cultural responsiveness in settings that are racially, ethnically, culturally or otherwise diverse requires considering cultural contexts as technical properties of validity. As evaluators, positioning cultural contexts as validity measures may include review procedures such as the accuracy with which programs serve diverse populations as well as how evaluators select instrumentation and how participants of diverse cultural backgrounds interpret items.

Additionally, cultural responsiveness is co-constructed between evaluators and evaluands. We must seek to identify and communicate the diverse worldviews that are represented in the evaluation process and, more importantly, how diverse beliefs, perspectives, behaviors and values can serve as “resource differences.” Such communications should be continuous, throughout initial, intermediate and final stages of evaluations.

Instrument Selection. When deciding upon which tools and instruments will be used as evaluative measures, it is important to recognize the diversity of our professional training. As much as possible, a range of recommended tools and instruments from multi-disciplinary perspectives should be shared with program participants and organizations.

Item Interpretation. When evaluative measures deemed appropriate are co-selected by evaluators and evaluands, determining the degree of item’s construct-relevance is necessary. Practicing cultural responsiveness requires being attentive to and appreciative of the possibilities for cultural variation. Including participants’ life contexts, prevailing socio-economic conditions, cultural communication and socialization styles in relation to how items are interpreted may reveal the need to, for example, modify measures’ number of items or adapt measurement processes.

Review Procedures. After selecting appropriate instruments and establishing items’ construct-relevance, inclusionary procedures to establish representation of program participants’ and organizations’ diversity is needed. Integrating the perspectives from culturally diverse panels in the interpretation of findings and presentation of results enhances the accuracy and validity of an evaluation.

Regardless of evaluation approach (i.e., participatory, utilization, systems) or method, being attentive and appreciate of diverse cultural contexts enhances both internal and external validity. To reframe diversity as a measure of validity, we recommend the following resources: Frierson, Hood and Hughes’ A guide to conducting culturally responsive evaluation as well as Basterra, Trumbull and Solano-Flores’ book, Cultural validity in assessment: Addressing linguistic and cultural diversity.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators. – See more at: http://aea365.org/blog/#sthash.yAoNXPwW.dpuf

Hello and Hola. We’re Nnenia Campbell, research assistant at the Natural Hazards Center, University of Colorado Boulder and Saúl Maldonado, research assistant at the ELLISA Project, University of California, Santa Cruz. We are recent graduates of the AEA Graduate Diversity Education Internship (GEDI). One of the GEDI goals is to: “Deepen the evaluation profession’s capacity to work in racially, ethnically and culturally diverse settings.” In this first of a two-part series, we share a few of the lessons we’ve learned that have led to our belief that definitions of diversity require amplification.

Diversity is not just race and ethnicity. Addressing the evaluative needs and interests of programs and organizations requires a consideration of the complex relationship between demographic composition and institutional factors. Program participants and organizations are never homogeneous. For example, factors such as age, gender, sexuality, language, religion, spirituality and national heritage as well as socio-economic and geospatial characteristics are significant traits that also intersect with racial and ethnic factors.

Additionally, it is important for evaluators to consider the relevance of political and/or socio-historical factors that may influence relationships between stakeholders. Paying attention to context offers insights to important underlying dynamics that influence the concerns expressed by key players. As evaluators, it is important to share with our stakeholders, in culturally responsive ways, that race and ethnicity indicators are not the only measures of diversity. Power dynamics, trust, and willingness to cooperate are often influenced by the “backstory,” which we must seek to understand.

Diversity is a worldview. How organizations and individuals understand and value diversity is important. Diversity is often considered in concert with culture and cultural practices. And culture is often described as either “surface” or “deep.” “Surface” cultural practices may include characteristics such as clothing, cuisine and art, while “deep” cultural practices may include behavior and value characteristics such as eye contact, speech patterns, concept of time, and notions of leadership and cooperation. As evaluators, working in culturally diverse settings requires the simultaneous consideration of both individuals’ beliefs and perspectives on “deep” cultural behaviors and values as well as organizations’ stances on diversity.

Communicating the interaction between individuals’ and organizations’ worldview in terms of diversity is a culturally responsive practice that informs why program improvement may or may not be evidenced.

We recommend the following resources as useful to amplifying our definitions of diversity: Faheemah Mustafaa’s post:  Pursuing Racial Equity in Evaluation Practice.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators. – See more at: http://aea365.org/blog/#sthash.yAoNXPwW.dpuf

Greetings, I am D. Pearl Barnett, MPA, graduate student at the University of Oklahoma, and recent graduate of AEA’s Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program.  During my work at the Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City, we completed an evaluation of the agency’s Strategic Plan. Here, I present a few salient lessons about cultural responsiveness from my experience.

When faced with the matter of “diversity” among evaluation stakeholders and participants, these questions surfaced: Is diversity an issue when organization staff reflect their community and service recipients (clients)? Does it matter in a monoracial organization/community? The theory of representative bureaucracy holds that shared demographics among stakeholders, staff, and clients, means shared values. By this logic, organizational programs, policies, and actvities should inherently address clients’ diverse needs and desires. The truth is organizations always have diversity concerns no matter its demographic make-up. It is our duty to address these concerns in our evaluations.

Strategies:

  • Improve evaluation quality – and the relationship between organization and evaluation staff – by discussing the value of client input and the importance of allowing the data to speak for itself.

Representative bureaucracy assumes a link between demographic similarity and cultural awareness within an organization. Cultural responsiveness is the realization that though staff and clients may be demographically similar, there are still many differences (i.e., needs and values) that must be addressed among clients. Ensuring clients have a voice is the first step.

  • Develop needs assessments, making sure to include the staff and community in every area of the process.

The cultural knowledge of the staff is important and ensuring all necessary information is gathered is equally important. The needs assessments serve as tools to obtain information directly from the clients. Staff and community member interviews throughout survey development are to improve respondents’ understanding, maximize the response rate, while generating staff buy-in to the evaluation and its outcomes.

 

Rad Resource:  Effectively Managing Nonprofit Organizations.  Edited By Richard L. Edwards and John A. Yankey. Published in 2006.  Washington, DC: NASW Press.  This book addresses diversity management and new approaches to program evaluation within the context of nonprofit organizations.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I’m Pat Campbell, president of Campbell-Kibler Associates, Inc.  Under NSF funding, Eric Jolly, president of the Science Museum of  Minnesota and I, with the help of a lot of friends, have been generating research-based tips, such as those below, to improve the accuracy of data collection, the quality of the analysis and the appropriateness of the data collected over diverse populations.

Hot Tips:

  • Ask for demographic information ONLY at the end of measures. There may be exceptions in cases for people with disabilities who will need accommodations in order to complete the measures.
  • Have participants define their own race/ethnicity and disability status rather than having the identification done by data collectors or project/program staff.  If a standard set of categories for race/ethnicity and/or disability is used, also, in an open-ended question, ask participants to indicate their own race/ethnicity and disability status.
  • Have members of the target population review affective and psychosocial measures for clarity. Ask them what concepts they think are being measured. If what is being measured is obvious and there are sex, race, or disability stereotypes associated with the concepts, consider using a less obvious measure if an equally valid measure is available.
  • Be aware that there can be heterogeneity within subgroups. For example, while people who are visually impaired, hearing impaired, and learning disabled are all classified as having disabilities, the differences among them are very large and it might be appropriate to disaggregate by different categories of disability.
  • When race/ethnicity, gender, or disability status is used as an independent variable, specify the reason for its use and include the reason in documentation of the results.

Lessons Learned:

  • All populations are diverse:  The diversity may be in terms of race, gender, ethnicity, age, geographic location, education, income, disability status, veteran status….  It may be visible or invisible. Most likely in every group there is a multiplicity of diversities.  High quality evaluations need to pay attention to the diversity of all populations being served.
  • Each individual is diverse.  As individuals, we have many demographic characteristics including our race, gender, ethnicity, age, geographic location, education, income, disability status, veteran status….  Rather than focusing on only one demographic category, high quality evaluations need to determine which categories are integral to the evaluation and focus on them.

Rad Resources:

  • Universal Design for Evaluation Checklist, 4th Edition.  The title, says it all.  Jennifer  Sullivan-Sulewski, & June Gothberg have developed a short planning tool that helps evaluators include people of all ages and all abilities in evaluations.
  • As soon as it goes live, we hope our website, Beyond Rigor will be another rad resource.  Let me know (Campbell@campbell-kibler.com) if you would like to be notified when that happens.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating the Disabilities and Other Vulnerable Populations TIG (DOVP) Week. The contributions all week come from DOVP members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluator.

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I’m Karen Anderson, AEA’s Diversity Coordinator Intern, and in this role I support AEA’s diversity programs, TIGs, and the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group.

The baton has been passed from the Cultural Competence in Evaluation Task Force, the Statement developers, to the Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group to translate the Statement from paper to practice. One strategy for its broader dissemination and use is integrating the Statement into the policies and procedures of organizations that conduct and commission evaluations.

The AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation has several core concepts, including the implications culture has for all phases of evaluation, including staffing of evaluation efforts and ensuring that members of the evaluation team collectively demonstrate cultural competence in the context for each evaluation. How does an evaluation practitioner or commissioner begin to do this?

Rad Resource:

Hot Tips:

  • Share the Statement and supplemental resources like Building Culturally Competent Organizations, Key Components to a Culturally Competent System, and It All Starts At The Front Desk with human resources and decision makers in organizations. Recommend the development of a cultural competence committee to monitor and make recommendations for policy revision, program development, and evaluation.
  • Include cultural competence language in the development and response to requests for proposals (RFPs). Check out this post How to Spot a Lip Service Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation from Patricia Rogers and Jane Davison’s Genuine Evaluation blog for tips on pointing out when a client may not be walking the walk in relation to culture and program development, theory, and evaluation.
  • If you or other employees at your organization belong to an AEA affiliate, organize an event at your office around the theory or practical applications of the Statement. The Atlanta Area AEA affiliate group hosted one recently, Taking a Stance Toward Culture: Cultural Competence in Evaluation. Reflections from the event can be found in the AEA Newsletter diversity article.
  • Set up a series of lunch and learns to begin having dialogue with colleague to increase awareness and to encourage relationship building, or start a book club discussion using the Statement, and branch out to other reading material to light the spark for cultural competence in evaluation.

The American Evaluation Association will be celebrating Cultural Competence Week. The contributions all this week come from the Cultural Competence committee. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluator.

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