AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Graduate Student and New Evaluators

Hi! My name is Denise Ramón. I am a doctoral student in education at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas and work at the Center for Civic Leadership that focuses on civic engagement and leadership. More specifically, I help to connect my university to the community. I am interested in Asset Based Community Development (ABCD).

Lessons Learned: While at the AEA 2014 Denver conference, I attended a session that was of particular interest to me, Altschuld, Hung, and Lee’s Getting Started in an Asset/Capacity Building and Needs Assessment Effort. Two dichotomous philosophical approaches were presented, needs assessment and asset / capacity building (A/CB). One of the main ideas stemming from this presentation was to create a hybrid framework between needs assessment and asset mapping. If evaluation is evolving to be visionary and sustainable, mixing traditional models, such as needs assessments, with newer ideas, such as capacity building and asset mapping, seems rather logical. This way, the best of both worlds can be extracted and can fill each other’s gaps, one can complement the other rather than being at odds. With this innovative notion, more research is needed to see if a model can really be developed and effectively implemented.

Coming to my second AEA conference enhanced my network system. I participated in most of the social events hosted by AEA, such as the TIG social events, the poster presentation session, and the silent auction. Getting to know others in the field gives me confidence to participate in more evaluation activities because I know I can ask for help and turn to other veterans with more expertise. Lesson learned: Jump in to AEA with confidence and an open mind. Reach out to others. Network.

Rad Resource: Using the AEA Public elibrary to find the presentations was so very useful for me. I was able to download the presentations and can now possibly use the document as a reference for my research. I highly recommend using the AEA e-library. You can also upload your own presentation and documents. It is another way to promote your work.

As a doctoral student and novice to the evaluation field, the mere experience of attending the conferences has enhanced my overall learning and understanding of evaluation. Not only have I learned about new resources to tap into, like the e-library, but I have been able to relate newly learned evaluation concepts to other parts of my professional and academic life and research. This has been in part to having made new connections.

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello! We are Çigdem Meek, Bashar Ahmed, and Marissa Molina, PhD students at the University of Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. As novice evaluators, we would like to share what we have learned from our experience of attending the 28th Annual Conference of the American Evaluation Association in Denver.

Lessons Learned:

  • Attending the conference as a group of PhD students from the same university eased our anxiety of being among expert evaluators. Plan with your peers to attend the next conference in Chicago!
  • Stay at the conference hotel (and make your reservation as soon as possible). You will not regret the networking opportunities it provides!
  • Attend pre-conference and post-conference workshops! Evaluation 101 is a great workshop to understand the basics of evaluation.
  • Join Topical Interest Groups (TIGS) business meetings. Meet with like-minded evaluators!
  • Look for volunteer opportunities, especially if this is your first time. This helps you meet with other evaluators with ease (and also helps with the registration cost).
  • Participate in panel discussions. This is an excellent way to meet and learn from other evaluators.
  • Do NOT miss the opportunities to learn from the best through panel discussions, workshops, and conference sessions! (i.e. Donna Mertens, Robert Stake, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, Hazel Symonette, Jody Fitzpatrick, Michael Scriven, Michael Patton, Art Hernandez, Karen Kirkhart, and Cindy Crusto have facilitated excellent sessions and provided exceptional insights for novice evaluators).
  • Make sure you have your business cards (a lot) with you and exchange! Remember to take notes on cards you receive (I thought I could remember all!). In order to stay connected send them a brief email within 10 days after conference.
  • Take notes to review later during the sessions and reflect on what you learn. Remember, reflection is what makes learning meaningful.

Rad Resources: Check out these resources before attending the conference!

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi, my name is Erica Roberts, an AEA GEDI scholar, doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, and an intern at the National Cancer Institute Office of Science Planning and Assessment. As a graduate student who is approaching the transition from student to professional in the field of public health evaluation, I would like to share with you the lessons I learned from attending the AEA conference in the hope that these lessons can be used by other graduate students planning to attend next year’s conference.

Lesson Learned: Prepare to build your professional network. The AEA conference provides an expansive and rare opportunity to meet evaluation experts, future mentors, and possible employers. Prior to attending the conference, use the Topical Interest Groups (TIG) to navigate the conference program and identify experts in your field of interest. Remember to pack business cards and update your resume or vitae. Once at the conference – be bold! Introduce yourself to presenters from organizations or fields of practice that interest you and have a few talking points or questions prepared. Once you’ve connected, add their information into an Excel spreadsheet and, after the conference, note if and when you follow-up via email and the outcome of your discussion. This will help for professional networking down the road!

Lesson Learned: Prepare to be overwhelmed (but in a good way). Before arriving at the conference, figure out a way to stay organized that works best for you. I brought my iPad to each session and used the EverNote app to take notes. Most importantly (to my organization), I kept a “to-do” note where I listed everything I wanted to do when I returned home (e.g., articles to read, experts to connect with, student scholarships or job opportunities to apply for). It is likely that you will encounter a lot of information that you want to know more about but do not have the mental space to process – this is where making a “to-do” list for home comes in handy!

Lesson Learned: Prepare to be inspired. You may find at the AEA conference that the ways to approach evaluation are endless – depending on the field, the context, the purpose, etc. Do not let this discourage you; rather – let it inspire you. Take these ideas and put them in your back pocket and know that at some point you may be asked to conduct an evaluation and you will have a myriad of methods and approaches to look to. I encourage you to use the AEA conference to learn about approaches to evaluation that you are not familiar with, and identify ways in which those methods could be adopted to your work!

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

 

 

Hello! My name is Danielle Cummings. I am a member of the AEA Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) program and a graduate student at NYU Wagner School of Public Service studying public policy analysis.

Attending AEA’s annual conference was inspiring and edifying. As a graduate student learning analytical methods and research design, the conference was a wonderful opportunity to see practical applications of many of the tools I learn about in the classroom. I came away from the experience with both a refined vision of what a career in evaluation might entail, as well as a wealth of theories, frameworks, and skills to integrate into my work.

I’m anxious to put so many of the things I learned at AEA into practice, but the technique I’m most excited about is called solution-focused qualitative interviewing. Dr. Emily Spence-Almaguer and Shlesma Chhetri introduced session participants to an innovative approach to qualitative inquiry that they believe has improved interview participants’ candor, thereby increasing the richness of their qualitative data. Trained as a social worker, Dr. Spence-Almaguer adapted a therapeutic technique called solution-focused therapy to enhance qualitative inquiry.

Hot Tip: There are two key elements of solution-focused dialogues: 1) People are experts on their lives, and 2) interviewees filter their responses based on expectations. In practice, this means that when we approach qualitative interviews with humility, treat interviewees as the experts, and frame our questions in a way that encourages creativity, interviewees’ responses will be more frank, dynamic, and provide sufficient context to require low levels of inference by the researcher.

Here are examples of typical vs. solution-focused qualitative questions asked by Dr. Spence-Almaguer’s research team in her research on solution-focused questions, and examples of interviewee responses:

Traditional approach:

What would you recommend to improve the program?

“Nothing, they are dong an outstanding job.”

Solution-focused approach:

If I were going to give this program another $100,000 next year, what would you recommend that the program administrators do with the money?

“Put more of the [initiative’s] programs together and coordinate them to make them work more effectively.”

By constructing a question that placed the interviewee in a position of authority and invoked imagery, the interviewer elicited a response that not only provided a critique of the program, but also a potential solution to a programmatic problem.

Rad Resource: This post just scratches the surface of solution-focused interviewing. For more information on this approach, check out the slide deck from Dr. Spence-Almaguer’s AEA presentation, available for free to AEA members on AEA’s eLibrary. Make sure to check out the list of additional solution-focused literature and resources on Slide 24!

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

I am Kristin Woods, 2013-2014 co-chair for the GSNE TIG; I am a PhD student at Oklahoma State University in the Research, Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics program and a faculty member at Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

I attended my first AEA conference in 2012 and was overwhelmed by the number of people and sessions as well as trying to learn about AEA. My advisor, Dr. Katye Perry, encouraged me to attend the Graduate Student and New Evaluator’s TIG business meeting. This drastically changed my experience with AEA because I was voted in as a co-chair even though I did not really know what I was getting into. Over the past two years, this experience has granted me many opportunities that have made me a better evaluator.

Opportunity 1: AEA Involvement. As a co-chair, I have further developed my skills as an evaluator through the vast amounts of resources on the AEA website. I have worked with AEA members, members of the board of directors, and staff on various tasks for the conference. For example, I served as a member and then chair of the Student Travel Awards Working Group and as a conference volunteer.

Opportunity 2: GSNE TIG Involvement. I have developed leadership skills through working with other members of the leadership team to coordinate the conference program, serve as a reviewer, run the business meetings, coordinate social outings, communicate with members, and develop a peer-mentorship program that connects novice evaluators with peers to aid navigating AEA and offer advice on evaluation.

Rad Resources:

  • GSNE TIG website has specific information geared toward novice evaluators and those new to AEA.
  • GSNE TIG Facebook Community Page is a place TIG members informally network throughout the year. We share resources, ask questions, and celebrate our successes as well as commiserate over our struggles.

Opportunity 3: Networking. These opportunities have allowed me to expand my network to include novice to more experienced evaluators from all over the world. I have co-authored several accepted submissions at the 2013 and 2014 AEA conferences, chaired sessions, and been asked to speak at another TIG’s business meeting. This has led to the past two years conferences being drastically different from my first conference. I speak with people I met the previous year, have engaged with through the Facebook page, e-mail, or on the phone. It allows me to put a face with a name, get to know them, and connect with another evaluator that has different experiences, therefore, becoming another resource in my toolbox to pull from when needed, which I do often.

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

My name is Andrea Guajardo and I am the Director of Community Health for CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Health System and a doctoral student at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. I have been a member of AEA for exactly one year, and in that year, I was selected for the Minority Serving Institution Fellowship program, elected as the Co-Chair of the Multi Ethnic Issues in Evaluation (MIE) Topical Interest Group (TIG), and functioned as a core planning member of La RED (Latino Responsive Evaluation Discourse) TIG. In addition to these positions within AEA, I have also presented two poster sessions and one paper at AEA2013 and AEA2014.

I would like to use this platform to encourage other graduate students to seize opportunities for professional development afforded by active participation in AEA.   Your graduate education related to evaluation can be tremendously supplemented by creating relationships with experienced evaluators and by providing leadership for groups within AEA.

Hot Tip 1: Become an official member of AEA, join a TIG, and volunteer your time. TIGs are an essential part of the AEA experience both at the annual conference and throughout the year. TIGs are responsible for coordinating the review of proposals in their area of interest and developing a strand of conference sessions at the AEA annual conference, so volunteer help with this process is always appreciated.   TIG membership can help you create relationships with top evaluators and might afford the opportunity to learn about emerging ideas in your field or discipline.

Hot Tip 2: Don’t just attend the annual conference – participate in it. Submit your own evaluation work for a poster, paper, roundtable, or birds of a feather.   Even if your research is in progress, it is still an appropriate occasion to perfect your presentation skills.

Hot Tip 3: Find a mentor. Many experienced AEA members are very willing to provide guidance about how to become more involved and to help map out a path in evaluation at AEA. Their expertise and guidance is valuable as you begin to navigate which activities will benefit you the most in your evaluation career.

Rad Resources: Where do I find more information about joining a TIG or participating in the next annual conference?

For more information about Topical Interest Groups: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=11

For more information about how to submit your evaluation work at AEA2015 in Chicago, Illinois: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=170

We’re celebrating Evaluation 2014 Graduate Students Reflection Week. This week’s contributions come from graduate students of Dr. Osman Ozturgut of the Dreeben School of Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, along with students from other universities. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi there! My name is Leigh M. Tolley, and I’m a Research Assistant at Hezel Associates, LLC in Syracuse, NY. As an advanced doctoral student in Instructional Design, Development and Evaluation at Syracuse University, I have been fortunate to present at two annual conferences of the Eastern Evaluation Research Society (EERS), my AEA local affiliate. EERS, the oldest professional society for program evaluators in the United States, welcomes participation by all interested individuals. In my experience, they have been particularly welcoming to students.

Lesson Learned: Local affiliates are a great way to get to know others interested in evaluation in your area. Their smaller conferences are ideal networking opportunities for students and new evaluators, and a chance for you to meet and interact with professionals in the field. For example, I was able to meet other evaluators in different states that are now go-to colleagues when I have questions about how they have approached issues that I face in my own work.

Lesson Learned: I submitted my first solo proposal to EERS after co-presenting with my advisor at the AEA conference in 2010. Although it was initially a challenge to figure out how to frame my thoughts, submitting a proposal was a way for me to start developing work I had done in class into a research focus. Preparing a paper presentation one year and a poster the next helped me refine my ideas and determine the best way to disseminate my findings. The more intimate venue of a local affiliate conference was less intimidating, but I still was able to get great feedback from talking about my emerging research from other students, evaluation professionals, and even current and past AEA Presidents! Through presenting at EERS, I felt much more comfortable in preparing proposals for and presenting at subsequent AEA conferences.

Lesson Learned: Regional conferences tend to be more informal, and can help you hone your presentation and discussion skills. For me, EERS was also a chance to attend some amazing plenary sessions and hear prominent evaluators share their work—even better, these were the same people that asked me about my research when I presented!

Hot Tip: EERS is currently accepting proposals for its 2015 conference. The theme this year is Let’s Get Real: Evaluation Challenges and Solutions. Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to submit proposals, too! The proposal deadline is Friday, December 12.

Rad Resource: To find your AEA local affiliate, check out the list of organizations here. There are almost 30 organizations at both the state and regional levels. Contact information for each affiliate is given, and many affiliates have their own website, too.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Jason Lawrence, Grants Manager at the Florida Office of the Attorney General and Student Sector Representative and Board Member for the Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA), a regional affiliate of the American Evaluation Association (AEA). I am also a second-year Masters of Public Administration (MPA) student in the Askew School of Public Administration and Policy, at Florida State University.

A career in evaluation often begins with solid graduate-level education. But the classroom isn’t the only place where you can prepare for the field. You’ll need additional skills to complement your degree before entering the job market. And those competencies can be acquired in three ways: internships or volunteer assignments; joining professional organizations; and presenting research at conferences.

Hot Tip: If you’re not already working as an evaluator or in a related position, then acquiring practical skills is a critical first step. Finding internship programs can help you overcome this deficiency, but acquiring one can be difficult and highly competitive.

Hot Tip: There is a shortcut. Instead of going through the painstaking application and interview process for an internship, you may consider volunteering your time with a local non-profit organization. These organizations spend a great deal of time measuring the results and effectiveness of their services, but may not have the resources to conduct rigorous evaluations.

As a volunteer, you may inquire how you could be part of their evaluation process. This quid-pro-quo gives the organization the human capital it needs to be effective and equips you with practical skills you need to advance your evaluation career.

Rad Resources: Many times such arrangements take shape through budding professional relationships.  As a member of AEA, you have access to a cadre of evaluation professionals who joined the organization for the very purpose of making connections and sharing skills of the trade. Memberships in professional organizations also afford opportunities to present your academic research at conferences. This is an impressive addition to a fledgling professional resume. Both SEA and AEA offer presenting opportunities year-round.

These are just a few of the ways an aspiring evaluator can break into the field. If you haven’t managed to do any of the above, there is still time. Having a year or even a semester left in graduate study means you have plenty of time to develop the skills needed to land your dream job. Enrolling in a graduate program is only a starting point.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA) Affiliate Week with our colleagues in the SEA Affiliate. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from SEA Affiliate members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I’m Alice Walters, a member of AEA’s Graduate Student and New Evaluator TIG.  I am a doctoral student in human services and work as a non-profit consultant in fund development, marketing, and evaluation.  Here, I explore potential pitfalls and recommendations based on experience with stakeholders for new evaluators.

Hot Tip 1:  Stakeholders are central to evaluation – include them in every step of the process.

This may be Evaluation 101 but it bears emphasizing.  Identify, include, and inform stakeholders.  Think carefully and critically about all involved parties in evaluation outcomes.  Leaving out key stakeholders may lead to poor quality evaluation in unrepresented perspectives.  Key decision-making stakeholders should be engaged in the evaluation process to ensure evaluation relevancy. 

Rad Resource: Engaging Stakeholders  This CDC guide has a worksheet for identifying and including stakeholders in evaluation.

Hot Tip 2:  Be proactive in frequent & ongoing communication to stakeholders.

Don’t assume that initial evaluation conversations and perspectives haven’t changed without your knowledge.  Frequent communication with stakeholders will alert you to any changes in stakeholder perspectives toward the evaluation.  Ongoing communication will also keep lines of communication open and inform stakeholders of evaluation progress.

Rad Resource: A Practical Guide for Engaging Stakeholders in Developing Evaluation QuestionsThis 48-page resource from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation covers engaging stakeholders throughout the evaluation process.  It provides worksheets and a range of useful communication strategies.

Hot Tip 3:  Take the time to consider stakeholder’s views at every stage of evaluation.

Stakeholders may be unclear about the evaluation process, its steps, and methods used.  Be sure to explain and continue to inform at every stage of evaluation.  As a new evaluator, I made the faulty assumption that stakeholder views were unchanging from initial evaluation meetings.  I also failed to use opportunities to communicate during evaluation stages that might have signaled changing circumstances from stakeholder response.  Evaluators should be cautious about assuming that evaluation environments and stakeholder views are static.

Rad Resource: Who Wants to Know? A 4-page tip sheet from Wilder Research on stakeholder involvement. Evaluators have an expertise that may require working away from direct stakeholder contact, particularly key decision-making stakeholders.  The relevancy of an evaluation requires ongoing stakeholder input.  Successful evaluation requires keeping communication channels open with stakeholders.

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Greetings, I am Laura Pryor. In addition to being a GEDI alumna, I am a student at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education in the Quantitative Methods and Evaluation program. As part of my graduate evaluation work, I have been exploring the recent trend of using multiple measures to evaluate teachers. As part of this trend, many policymakers and district leaders are combining multiple measures into a summative composite score, often for the purposes of high-stakes decision making (such as salary and personnel).

As a graduate student evaluator, I have been exploring two questions:
1) Is it necessary and/or purposeful to create a composite score?
2) If so, how should an evaluator combine multiple measures into a single composite score?

I hope this post provides insight into these questions so that evaluators can more easily navigate the increasingly popular context of high-stakes teacher evaluations.

Hot Tip 1: The purpose of the evaluation should decide if a composite score is needed. While it may be a current trend, not all multiple measure evaluation systems are used for a personnel or salary decision. For many districts and schools, the evaluation system is used to help teachers/staff identify areas for improvement; in this case, a composite score is not always necessary. If the evaluation system is intended for multiple purposes, prioritize purposes with stakeholders and discuss the feasibility for the evaluation system to embody multiple uses.

Hot Tip 2: If creating a composite score, select a model that is most appropriate for the evaluation:
a. The conjunctive approach: A pass/fail score is given; individuals must score at a specified passing level on every measure.
b. The disjunctive approach: A pass/fail score is given; individuals are only required to score at a passing level on one of the measures.
c. The compensatory approach: Individuals are given a continuum of scores; low scores on certain measures are compensated for by high scores on other measures.

Hot Tip 3: When using a compensatory approach, decide how to combine the measures:
a. Clinically: Evaluation stakeholders decide how to weight each measure; this is often called the ‘eyeballing’ approach.
b. Statistically: Select a criterion target and use regression methods to statistically determine the weights for each measure; this approach is considered more accurate than the clinical approach.

Rad Resources:

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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