AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Environmental Program Evaluation

Hi, I’m Katherine Dawes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. I’m currently on a year-long assignment as a Visiting Scholar at The George Washington University Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration (find me at kdawes [at] gwu [dot] edu).

Earth Day 2016 theme is “Trees for the Earth. Let’s get planting.” Everyone knows that trees changing with the season are perfect metaphors for transitions. Every four to eight years, as spring trees start blooming, evaluators in the United States’ federal sector start contemplating our major upcoming seasonal change – the transition to a new Presidential Administration. We wonder: What will be our new federal evaluation goals and policies?  How will we change (or continue) our work to meet the needs and expectations of a new, energetic Administration?

Aside from tree leaves, what On Earth can an evaluator read to learn what the next Administration cares about (or is hearing from national experts) concerning evaluation, management, accountability, data… any issue that will directly or indirectly influence my work?

To understand the forest…err…big picture of U.S. presidential transitions and to learn what prospective federal leaders are considering planting, veteran transition watchers have many Rad Resources. Some of my favorites for evaluation-relevant info:

  • The White House Transition Project provides information to prospective federal leaders to help “[streamline] the process of transition from one administration to the next.” The Project coordinates with government agencies and non-government groups like the Partnership for Public Service and National Academy of Public Administration.
  • The National Academy of Public Administration’s Transition 2016 publishes articles and papers intended “to inform incoming national leaders about the policy and management challenges facing the nation.”
  • The Partnership for Public Service established the Center for Presidential Transition supporting the “Ready to Govern®” initiative. It has a repository for documentation from previous transitions and “shares management recommendations for the new administration to address government’s talent and operational challenges…”
  • As part of Ready to Govern, the IBM Center for the Business of Government joined with the Partnership in launching the Management Roadmap. The Roadmap presents “a set of management recommendations for the next administration – enhancing the capacity of government to deliver key outcomes for citizens.”

Daily news organizations and social networks with a federal focus supply fantastic transition information in short, readable bites – check out Government Executive and GovLoop. In addition to daily reporting, Federal News Radio co-sponsors longform interviews that are available as podcasts.  A recent interview with Professor Martha Kumar, a White House Transition project director, shares the rich history of U.S. presidential transitions. (You can also find fascinating interviews focused on program evaluation.)

Share your Rad Resources for government transitions. Let’s get reading!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, I’m Rupu Gupta, Co-Chair of AEA’s Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group and Researcher at NewKnowledge.org, a research and evaluation think tank.  Earth Week brings with it an ideal time to critically consider the potential of environmental education programs to create opportunities for professionals to protect the planet for a living!

Rad Resource: I have been leading the evaluation of The Nature Conservancy’s LEAF (Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future) Program.  This national conservation internship program aims to create skilled and empowered environmental stewards. Across different cohorts, we have consistently found that high school youth are motivated and keenly interested in pursuing higher education in environment-related majors and joining environmental careers.

With the most recent cohort of this program we expanded our evaluation framework to study how the interns conceptualized and thought about the activities involved and the skills that are necessary for in environmental careers. Our multi-phase evaluation revealed striking shifts in how the youth perceived environmental careers.

Before they participated in the internship, teens had vague understandings of environmental jobs. After the program, they recognized that persistence and impacts on ecosystems, animals, and people were the defining features of these careers. They could also connect these attributes to different disciplines (e.g., law, environmental education) and activities (e.g., conducting research, participating in activism). Moreover, five months after the internship, their perceptions had grown sharper, so that they could think about the skills, activities, and recipients in discrete ways.

Lessons Learned:

  • Emphasize the multiple disciplinary pathways to environmental careers– programs need to create greater awareness of the diverse educational backgrounds that can contribute to an environmental career.
  • Character traits are critical in an environmental career – a determined, action-oriented personal attribute was perceived by the youth to be a key component of careers aiming to protect the environment.
  • The environmental workforce may be a psychologically resilient group – if persistence, a character-based aspect is a necessary aspect of the job, its implications on being adaptive and responsive to changing circumstances are worth studying.
  • Pathways to environmental careers for youth need to be extended – beyond broadening the career horizons for youth to pursue environmental careers, conservation programs need to create access to these careers for youth, and especially those from racial and ethnic minority groups.
  • Every day can be Earth Day! A more diverse environmental workforce means greater, sustained engagement in environmental protection by a larger segment of the population, and more professionals working, in their own unique ways, to save the world!

Rad Resources: Read more about Diversity in the Environmental Workforce to discover more about the possibilities of environmentally-minded careers!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi! I’m Shari Grossarth from the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Evaluation Support Division. I’m part of a team at EPA that’s trying out a knowledge synthesis approach to inform our work to advance sustainable purchasing in the federal government and other large institutions. The project is still underway, but I’ll share a bit about it and some of the resources we’re using to guide our approach.

Our focus is on understanding outcomes and lessons learned from servicizing approaches. Servicizing is the procurement of a function of a product rather than the product itself, like bike-sharing instead of bike ownership or purchasing a floor covering system instead of carpet. Servicizing should lead to more sustainable outcomes, like fewer products being produced, products being made to last and customers using only what they need, but we want to see what the existing knowledge base tells us about outcomes.

We’re casting a broad search for existing evaluative knowledge relevant to outcomes and lessons learned from servicizing approaches, and synthesizing the key findings to inform EPA’s efforts and share with others. Our general approach is depicted in the graphic below. We’ll search a broad range of evaluative knowledge, including grey literature, published literature, evaluations, and discussions with experts. We’ll synthesize the knowledge we find and create an online collection to share the key findings and knowledge sources. We hope that the collection will ultimately become a collaborative space where others add and share additional related knowledge. We’re working with IssueLab, a knowledge sharing platform, and collaborating with the Environmental Evaluators Network (EEN) in their efforts to develop an Architecture for Environmental Evaluation, or ArchEE.

Grossarth

Rad Resources: We’re truly trying this out, borrowing from other related endeavors and learning as we go. These are some of the resources we’ve referenced to shape our efforts.

Image courtesy of Shari Grossarth

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I’m John Fraser, a conservation psychologist and President & CEO of the non-profit think tank, NewKnowledge.org.  Our research on climate change has taken a very interesting direction in the past few years. For generations, we’ve focused on individual sustainability behaviors as a gateway to more conservation action. Unfortunately, that’s turning out not to be true.  We’ve been working with the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation, studying how people who visit informal learning environments engage in sustainability, and whether programs can increase their likelihood to do something.

Lesson Learned: There were two findings from our work that seemed counter-intuitive to the prevailing wisdom. First, the educators themselves exercised self-censoring and, like the majority of the population, thought their values were discordant to those in their community.  It turned out that most people weren’t talking about the need to address climate change because they thought they were more concerned than others in their area. But surprisingly, almost everyone in our surveys estimated that their personal concern was greater than other organizations. And that perception led them to be less likely to engage others in talking about climate change solutions.

Our research has also corroborated a growing body of data suggesting that individual behaviors are more likely to help people feel self-assured and may not promote more global sustainability.  If we truly believe that we need a more sustainable society, then one of the highest priorities in environmental action is promoting change in how organizations and groups choose to change their technologies away from carbon producing energy.

Therefore, this Hot Tip comes from our team.  We’ve decided to stop using likelihood to engage in individual sphere behaviors as a representation of achieving sustainability outcomes. We suggest that unless we assess likelihood that individuals are working to engage others in their innovation, technology transfer, substitution and curtailment at a wholesale level, there is no way we’ll logically end up with the impacts that are the goal of most environmental education.

Connections between messaging, understanding, hope, and action.

Connections between messaging, understanding, hope, and action.

Image credit: NewKnowledge

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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We’re Matt Keene and Cameron Norman, from the Silwood Group, a transdisciplinary group of evaluators, systems scientists and conservation leaders. We’re working to address challenges at the nexus of social and ecological systems where complex situations are common, uncertainty is high and predictability is low. Though we can’t be certain of the extent, we are increasingly aware that we see the world not as it is but as we are. Humility must be our touchstone for meaningful reflection on what we perceive and how we act. With that understanding we adapt to the unveiling of reality.

As we enter Earth week we can reflect on the importance and ambition of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the people whose well-being depends, in part, on evaluation’s capacity to honor its role in meeting these goals.

Our team is designing a praxis-orientated approach to grapple with evaluation challenges like those presented by the SDGs. The concept of praxis has a long history, stretching from Aristotle’s practical orientation to knowledge to the political and social activism of Paolo Friere. Praxis is the process of practicing or enacting an idea or theory. Praxis eschews common worldviews that separate and order knowledge and practice and instead positions our knowledge of the world as a practice, enabling us to act on the world more purposefully.

Lesson Learned: Praxis requires attention. It is a living, developmental concept that requires focus, attention and flexibility to continually learn, adjust and improve.

Today, the lens through which we are seeing consists of four elements of immediate relevance to evaluation’s capacity to contribute to the SDGs and other goals set amidst complexity:

  1. Understand values of all stakeholders – values and their relationships may compete, contradict, or complement.
  2. Use wisdom in judgment and action – reflect on our present biases, prejudices and choice, use evidence from the past to design and create conditions for the future.
  3. Learn through ongoing evaluative systemic inquiry – balancing the systematic and the systemic to generate learning through action.
  4. Attend to the whole, humbly – systems thinking in practice to find and understand our limits, acknowledge our “inevitable partiality”…and proceed.

So, that’s a “whole” lot to digest. To help along some admittedly circuitous conversations, we began developing a model of our praxis-oriented approach.

Lesson Learned: This is contentious stuff. The dualism of know / do is deeply ingrained in most of us and our scholarly disciplines. Taking that on is not for the faint of heart.

Lesson Learned: Sensemaking is key. Making the time to come together, learn and reflect is taxing and takes time…but it’s also a party(!) that amplifies learning and extends action.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Michael Quinn Patton. I am an independent evaluation consultant based in Minnesota but working worldwide.  As part of Earth Week, a worldwide perspective on global systems change seems especially appropriate.

I have taught in the International Program for Development Evaluation Training (IPDET) every year since its inception in 2000.  I conducted the meta-evaluation of the Evaluation of the Paris Declaration on International Development Aid. I joined with evaluators around the world last year in celebrating 2015 as the International Year of Evaluation devoted to enhancing national evaluation capacity in developing countries.  In these and other international evaluation experiences I have become acutely aware that we need global solutions to global problems – and we need evaluators with competence to undertake global systems change initiatives.   Earth Week is a good time to reiterate the need for globally oriented, world savvy evaluators.

Lesson Learned: Albert Einstein famously said: “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” Nation-state boundaries are the result of war, imperialism, colonialism, enslavement, exploitation, genocide, oppression, greed, politics, and religious persecution. Environmental degradation is but one of the results.  Global problems transcend national boundaries. Examples include:

  • Climate change
  • Economic turbulence
  • Refugees
  • Virulent infectious diseases
  • Dying oceans
  • Global cyber-terrorism
  • International drug cartels
  • Human trafficking
  • Weapons trafficking
  • Poverty and inequality

Hop tip: Global problems need global initiatives evaluated by globally knowledgeable evaluators. To evaluate global systems change means applying core systems concepts globally: attention to perspectives, boundaries, and interconnections.

Lesson learned: Take a global perspective. You can’t see the Earth as a whole unless you get at least 20,000 miles away. On December 7, 1972 the first photograph was taken of Planet Earth: the Blue Marble Shot.

MQPattonBlueMarble

Lesson learned:  Evaluate Beyond Boundaries and Borders.  Earth week and the Blue Marble Shot remind us to Think Globally, Act Globally, and Evaluate Globally because we are truly interdependent.

Rad resource: Blue Marble Evaluation webinars (no cost): March 16, April 20, and May 18.

Rad resource: Global Systems Change Evaluation course, June 23-24.

Rad resource: Look at real time Blue Marble Shots from Space for Earth Week. Japan’s Himawari-8 Satellite Captures Whole Earth’s Images Every 10 Minutes. Takes 144 photographs of the entire planet a day.

Rad resource:  Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, I am Rupu Gupta, Analyst at New Knowledge Organization Ltd. and Co-Chair of AEA’s Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. My evaluation work focuses on learning about the environment and conservation in informal settings. As we celebrate Earth Day, I would like to share some reflections on evaluating these experiences.

Lessons Learned: Informal learning settings are critical to learn about the environment and actions to protect it. Informal learning settings offer opportunities for “free-choice” learning, where the learners choose and control what they learn. They are typically institutions such as zoos, botanic gardens, aquariums, and museums, distinct from formal educational settings like schools. With hundreds of millions of visits to these institutions annually, they are prime settings to engage the public in thinking about the environment. Conservation education is often a key aspect of these institutions’ programming, where visitors can learn about different forms of nature (e.g., animals, natural habitats), threats they face (e.g., climate change), and actions to address them (e.g., reducing energy use). Educational experiences here are often referred to as informal science learning for their connection with understanding natural systems.

Learning about the environment in informal learning settings can happen through a variety of experiences. Informal learning is socially constructed, through a complex process that includes oneself, close others (friends, family) and more distant others (institution staff). Specific experiences, like animal encounters, hands-on interactions with flora in botanic gardens, or media-based elements (e.g., touch screens) enable visitors to engage with information about nature and the environment. Docents play an important role in helping visitors ‘interpret’ the message embedded in the experiences and exhibits. Evaluators assessing the impact of the different experiences in informal settings, need to be mindful of the multiple pathways for visitors to engage with the environmental information.

Informal learning manifests broadly. Learning experiences in informal settings encompass outcomes, beyond learning traditionally associated with school-based education. In the process of making meaning of the various experiences, learning is tied to the multiple aspects of the human experience. They can be cognitive (e.g., gaining knowledge about climate change impacts), attitudinal (e.g., appreciating native landscapes), emotional (e.g., fostering empathy towards animals) or behavioral (e.g., signing a petition for an environmental cause). A mix of qualitative and quantitative methods are best to capture the complex learning experiences. By considering the range of learning possibilities, evaluators can design and conduct effective evaluations to understand how people engage with the multi-faceted topic of the environment.

Rad Resources: The following are great to get acquainted with evaluation in informal learning settings:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Happy Earth Week from the EPE TIG!  My name is Lydia Lange. I am the Co-Chair of the EPE TIG and an independent researcher/evaluator specializing in natural resource management and sustainability education. In honor of Earth Week, I want to share a bit about environmental evaluation and the privilege we have as a TIG to support this growing field.

I have been volunteering with the EPE TIG Leadership Team for the past three years and am thrilled to be a part of the excitement surrounding environmental evaluation.  The EPE TIG has over 300 members who specialize in environmental arenas including conservation, environmental policy, environmental education, energy, international and global environmental issues and work for government (state and local), academic, consulting and non-profit organizations.  Still, many more bring with them experience from different disciplines and content areas.   However, what we share is a personal and professional passion for the environment, and for promoting a stronger community of practice in environmental evaluation. I’ve have met an inspiring, resourceful, and dynamic community of evaluators – many of whom are leaders in their field. New practitioners learn from the experience of long time evaluators, and more established practitioners learn from the diverse perspectives of an ever-growing member base.

A long standing interest in the environment drove 2014 AEA President Beverly Parsons to join the EPE TIG seven years ago. When I interviewed Beverly last February, she noted the upturn in environmental awareness and discussion generally and talked about her excitement in the potential for the EPE TIG to help shape dialogue.

The success of the Environmental Evaluators Network forum is further proof of the interest in the burgeoning field.  Who knew that what started as a small meeting of 90 individuals in 2006 would evolve into the international network it is today.  A network the TIG has supported each year.

This is an exciting time for AEA, the TIG, and the field of environmental evaluation. The coming year has never been a better time for the field. The TIG looks forward to supporting a vision of evaluation that involves a sustainable AEA, and practice.

Rad Resources: To learn more about the EPE TIG and Environmental Program evaluation check out the resources below.

Clipped from http://comm.eval.org/environmental/home/

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello! My name is Anna Williams. I have worked on issues related to sustainable development as an evaluator, facilitator, and agent of change for 20+ years.

The concept of sustainable development took hold 25 years ago, but several challenges have hampered interpretation and analysis of progress, starting with these:

The future of sustainability.  Advancing the well being of girls and women is now commonly understood as a critical underpinning to sustainable development

The future of sustainability. Advancing the well being of girls and women is now commonly understood as a critical underpinning to sustainable development

1. The oft-cited 1987 Brundtland Commission definition of sustainable development is “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”  This definition does not translate well into practical application, and it causes confusion.

2. Sustainability and social equity are often viewed as inherently at odds, even when they are inextricably tied and win-win solutions are available in several areas, such as maternal health, energy efficiency, and subsistence fisheries.  (This is not to discount the reality that some real tensions and tradeoffs do still need to be addressed.)

3. Efforts to identify sustainable development goals and indicators, and to measure and evaluate progress toward sustainable development, have struggled, and many faded into the background around ten years ago.

The good news: This past paradigm has faded, and in its place is the next era of sustainable development. 

According to the Marine Stewardship Council, about 1 billion people - largely in developing countries - rely on fish as their primary animal protein source.

According to the Marine Stewardship Council, about 1 billion people – largely in developing countries – rely on fish as their primary animal protein source.

There is now consensus that human equity and well being are at the heart of sustainable development; that realizing environmental sustainability requires addressing extreme poverty, energy access, and maternal and reproductive health, among other fundamentals.  In The Future We Want, the Rio +20 Resolution adopted in July 2012, the UN General Assembly stated, “Eradicating poverty is the greatest global challenge facing the world today and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. In this regard we are committed to freeing humanity from poverty and hunger as a matter of urgency.”

To prepare for a 2015 post Millennium Development Goals agenda, efforts are underway to redefine sustainable development and create ways to understand progress toward it. One promising example of improved goals, targets, and indicators is the UN-commissioned Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s proposed framework for sustainable development, which has 10 goals, 30 targets, and 100 indicators.   The first proposed goal is end extreme poverty, including hunger.  Other next-generation efforts are taking place at the global, national, and local levels.  It is an inspiring time when the past 25 years are informing the next 25, and evaluation of sustainable development initiatives will be able to benefit greatly from these advances.

Rad Resources: Below are a few resources for next-generation indicators and evaluative analysis tools for sustainable development:

Climate change will disproportionately affect those who are least responsible.  Prevention and adaptation are squarely humanitarian concerns.

Climate change will disproportionately affect those who are least responsible. Prevention and adaptation are squarely humanitarian concerns.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Hi everyone!  I’m Yvonne M. Watson, an Evaluator in U.S. EPA’s Evaluation Support Division and Chair of AEA’s Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group.  As we celebrate Earth Week in April and prepare for the annual American Evaluation Association  (AEA) conference in October, the theme of sustainability looms large.

As I think about an area where organizations and individuals can make a significant difference to ensure a sustainable future, consumer choice and green purchasing/procurement comes to mind.  The federal government’s role as the leading purchaser of green products is vital to ensuring a sustainable future.  Equally important is the role that households and individuals play in this equation.

Lesson Learned: According to Fischer’s 2010 report, Green Procurement: Overview and Issues for Congress, at the institutional level, federal government procurement accounts for $500 billion annually. Because of its size and purchasing power, the federal government influence on the market is broad—“affecting manufacturing (product planning and development), and purchasing (large institutions and States that mimic federal specifications) both nationally, and internationally.  Established in 1993, the purpose of EPA’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Program is to: 1) achieve dramatic reductions in the environmental footprint of federal purchasing through creation of guidelines, tools, recognition programs, environmental standards and other incentives and requirements, and (b) make the overall consumer marketplace more sustainable through federal leadership.  In 2011, the EPP program initiated an evaluation to examine the changes in spending on green products across the federal government since 2001. The results indicate greater awareness and positive attitudes towards green procurement among federal purchasers surveyed.

At the individual level, consumers not only vote with their feet – they vote with their purses and wallets too, through the purchase of food, cars, electronics, clothes and a host of other services. In addition, the prominence of green and eco-labels is a prime example of the manufacturing industry’s response to greater demand from consumers who look for green products.  During Earth Week, I encourage organizations, individuals and evaluators alike to take a step back and assess our individual and collective consumer purchasing decisions and the implications for a sustainable future.  After all, the purchasing choices we make today affect the future we have tomorrow.

Rad Resources: EPA’s Greener Products website provides information for consumers, manufacturers and institutional purchasers related to green products.

The EPP Evaluation Report is available here.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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