AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Community Psychology

Growing up in the South with my name – Lovely Dhillon – assured me of a few things.  One, people would likely remember me, and two, that I would have to try to live up to an often used Southern expression, “lovely is as lovely does.”  After having moved back to the South last year after over 20 years away, I realize how much I missed the colloquialisms, the regularly warm hellos, the willingness to engage in insightful conversation, and the sense of community.

As my new hometown, Atlanta, welcomes the AEA membership, I know Atlanta will provide that warmth, knowledge, community and, truth be told, calories.  I wonder, however, what we, as a membership organization, will provide Atlanta, other host cities and the larger community around us.

Please join us as we dig into just this question through a think tank, “Designing AEA’s Collective Impact” on Friday, October 28th in Room L505  (8:00 am – 9:30 am).  Drawing from AEA’s mission to “support the contribution of evaluation to the generation of theory and knowledge about effective human action,” Beverly Parsons, Denise Roosendaal, Matt Keene, Susan Wolfe and I will engage with you about ways the AEA membership does, could or should work in collective ways to impact the communities in which we have our annual meetings, and/or work collectively on engaging in broad social issues.  We will investigate what organizations in other sectors do toward collective action and consider what AEA members can design and set in motion in the next few months.

Cool Tricks:

One example of AEA action is the Community Psychology TIG sponsoring “Walk the Talk” sessions at annual conferences.  In Atlanta this year, the TIG will visit the Georgia Justice Project: http://www.gjp.org/. Participants will have a chance to interact with project staff and members and learn about their evaluation questions, challenges, successes, and needs.  Other AEA members are highlighting small, local nonprofits in workshop sessions as case examples so that AEA members can provide insights and suggestions that might otherwise be inaccessible.

Lessons to Be Learned:

We expect there are many other examples of how AEA members are working together to contribute to organizations and issues outside of our clients, colleagues or institutions.  This session will be a great way to hear all about those ideas and come up with others.

Hot Tip:

As you pack your bags for your trip to the city that was key to the civil rights movement, come with ideas of what we, as a membership, can do to collectively to advance positive social change.

Oh – and remember to come with a warm smile and an empty stomach!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

My name is Emily Spence-Almaguer and I am an Associate Professor of Behavioral and Community Health at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. I spend most of my professional time serving as an independent evaluator for community initiatives and conducting assessment studies. I am a social worker by training and have found that the conversational skills used in Solution-Focused Therapy have great application in the realm of evaluation and community assessment.

Hot Tips: My favorite ways to use solution-focused dialogues are in:

  • Focus group and individual interviews because they help generate rich qualitative data and great ideas for continuous program improvements.
  • Evaluation planning meetings because they help stakeholders articulate a wide range of potential outcomes and describe how those outcomes might be observed (i.e., measured).
  • Meetings where stakeholders are being debriefed around disappointing evaluation results. The nature of solution-focused dialogues avoids finger-pointing and helps drive forward momentum.

Hot Tips:

  • It’s all about the questions!! Solution-focused dialogues are driven by questions that promote deep reflection and critical thinking.
  • Context: Use questions that help situate people’s minds in a particular context and use details in your question that will encourage an individual to imagine him or herself in that moment. Here’s an example that I use with consumers at a program trying to help lift individuals and families out of poverty:
    • I want you to take a moment and imagine that you just learned that the Bass [local philanthropist] family recently donated $100,000 to the United Way for this project. They want you to help them figure out how to best spend the money. What is the first thing you would advise them to do? What would you advise them to do next?
    • Expertise: I love the way that Gaiswinker and Roessler referred to this as the “expertise of not-knowing”. In solution-focused dialogues the words of questions and tone of delivery are carefully crafted to amplify the assumption that the stakeholders have exceptional knowledge, skills and capacities.

Rad Resource: For an introduction to solution focused concepts, I like Coert Visser’s Doing What Works Blog.

spence

Download from the AEA Public eLibrary to View the Poster in Full Size!

Rad Resource: I presented on Solution-Focused dialogues in evaluation at AEA’s Evaluation 2012 conference. You can download my poster and resources list from the AEA public eLibrary here.

Lessons Learned: A direct question, such as “What would you recommend to improve this program?” often fails to generate detailed or meaningful responses. In focus groups with program consumers, I find that this question is interpreted as “what is wrong with the program?” and may lead to comments in defense of the program staff members (see my 2012 AEA poster for an example of this from my data).

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365, an occasional series. The contributions for Best of aea365 are reposts of great blog articles from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

No tags

We are Natalie Wilkins and Shakiyla Smith from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As public health scientists and evaluators, we are charged with achieving and measuring community and population level impact in injury and violence prevention. The public health model includes: (1) defining the problem, (2) identifying risk and protective factors, (3) developing and testing prevention strategies, and (4) ensuring widespread adoption. Steps 3 and 4 have proven to be particularly difficult to actualize in “real world” contexts. Interventions most likely to result in community level impact are often difficult to evaluate, replicate, and scale up in other communities and populations.[i]

A systems framework for injury and violence prevention supplements the public health model by framing injury within the community/societal context in which it occurs.[ii] Communities are complex systems- constantly changing, self-organizing, adaptive, and evolving.  Thus, public health approaches to injury and violence prevention must focus more on changing systems, versus developing and testing isolated programs and interventions, and must build the capacity of communities to implement, evaluate, and sustain these changes.[iii] However, scientists and evaluators face challenges when trying to encourage, apply, and evaluate such approaches, particularly in collaboration with other stakeholders who may have conflicting perspectives. A systems framework requires new methods of discovery, collaboration, and facilitation that effectively support this type of work.

Lessons Learned:

  • Evaluators can use engagement and facilitation skills to help stakeholders identify their ultimate goals/outcomes and identify the systems within which these outcomes are nested (Goodman and Karash’s Six Steps to Thinking Systemically provides an overview for facilitating systems thinking processes).
  • Evaluators must also address and communicate around high-stakes, conflictual issues that often undergird intractable community problems. “Conversational capacity”[iv] is an example of a skillset that enables stakeholders to be both candid and receptive in their interactions around challenging systems issues.

Rad Resources:

  • Finding Leverage: This video by Chris Soderquist provides an introduction to systems thinking and how it can be applied to solve complex problems.
  • The Systems Thinker: Includes articles, case studies, guides, blogs, webinars and quick reference “pocket guides” on systems thinking.

i Schorr, L., & Farrow, F. (2014, November). An evidence framework to improve results. In Harold Richman Public Policy Symposium, Washington, DC, Center for the Study of Social Policy.

ii McClure, R. J., Mack, K., Wilkins, N., & Davey, T. M. (2015). Injury prevention as social change. Injury prevention, injuryprev-2015.

iiiSchorr, L., & Farrow, F. (2014, November). An evidence framework to improve results. In Harold Richman Public Policy Symposium, Washington, DC, Center for the Study of Social Policy.

iv. Weber, C. (2013) Conversational capacity: The secret to building successful teams that perform when the pressure is on.  McGraw Hill Education: New York, NY

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

· ·

Hi! I am Cathy Lesesne and I work at ICF International doing public health related evaluation and research. My passion is doing work that affects the lives of adolescents, particularly those with the most need and the least voice in how to meet those needs. I do a lot of work in and with schools and school districts focused on optimal sexual health for teens and how to ensure youth have skills and ability to make healthy choices no matter when they decide to engage in sexual activity.

I often see well-intentioned school or school district staff creating solutions for youth and testing them rather than involving youth in solution identification and evaluation of the success. It is clearly easier to retain the power to determine the solutions and to see if they work in the end through evaluation. However, in my own work I have seen the power of youth engagement and involvement in both developing programs and services as well as in helping to evaluate and improve those resources.

Rad Resources: As evaluators, we often have the ability to make recommendations to our clients and partners working with youth AND we have the power to approach our evaluation work with youth in empowering and engaging ways. But we don’t always know how. I highly recommend that you dig into the Youth-Adult Partnerships in Evaluation (Y-AP/E): A Resource Guide for Translating Research into Practice and find your own ways to apply the wide range of ideas, tip sheets, and examples for engaging youth as partners in evaluation. Many of these examples may also help your clients or partners think of ways to better engage youth in the development of programs and services that reflect them and their real interests and needs. If youth are empowered to be partners in developing and testing solutions, they become allies instead of subjects; sources of solutions instead of sources of data.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

I am Carrie Lippy, an independent evaluator working with community-based and culturally specific domestic violence agencies. For the last two years, I have worked closely with the NW Network, an agency providing intervention and prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of abuse.

Thinking about community-level impacts often brings to mind regional or place-based notions of community. For example, interventions targeting neighborhoods, cities, or counties. However, many culturally specific programs aim to impact identity-based, rather than place-based communities. Identity-based communities are those developed among people with shared identities, such as sexual orientation or gender identities.

Below are some lessons learned & rad resources for evaluating community-level impacts for identity-based communities.

Lessons Learned:

  • Be clear on who the community is. Defining identity-based communities can be tricky. For example, when looking at impacts on LGBTQ communities, evaluators need to be mindful of the impressive diversity of LGBTQ people, recognizing that even the terminology used to identify members of these communities may differ widely. Terminology can differ by factors such as age, race/ethnicity, and region. Some members of LGBTQ communities may even identify as heterosexual (e.g., some transgender people).
  • The importance of online community spaces for identity-based communities. Since identity-based communities typically have less connection to geographic areas, online spaces hold particular importance for connecting community members. In fact, even online spaces that are not culturally specific can still reach many identity-based communities. Recently, the National LGBTQ Domestic Violence Capacity Building Learning Center partnered with the National Domestic Violence Hotline to examine the experiences of LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence. Although the online survey was posted on the non-LGBTQ-specific Hotline website, nearly 600 LGBTQ survivors completed the survey, illustrating the reach of even non-culturally specific online spaces.
  • A need for alternative sampling strategies. Some identity-based communities can be especially challenging to reach, making measuring community-level effects quite difficult. In my work with the NW Network, we’ve found snowball sampling strategies particularly effective for reaching marginalized members of LGBTQ communities, including some transgender communities of color or LGBTQ immigrants. Snowball sampling techniques utilize existing connections in communities to recruit research participants.

Rad Resources:

For those interested in learning more about culturally-specific research and practice in LGBTQ communities, check out:

  • A free, online library with resources on domestic violence in LGBTQ communities. The library was created by the National LGBTQ DV Capacity Building Learning Center, a joint project of the NW Network and the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Projects.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

Hi! My name is Amy Hilgendorf and I am the Associate Director for Engaged Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Community and Nonprofit Studies (the CommNS). We specialize in community-based action research and evaluation partnerships with grassroots and nonprofit groups and offer support to others who do this work.

In recent years, we have partnered with county-based and statewide coalitions that are seeking to address childhood obesity by applying a model of collective impact. John Kania and Mark Kramer first characterized collective impact as consisting of five key conditions that can help unite multi-sector collaborative efforts towards greater community impact than what isolated efforts can achieve. Those five conditions are: a common agenda, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, shared measurement systems, and backbone support. The coalitions we work with have found the collective impact model offers valuable guidance for the kinds of processes that will set them up for achieving impact, but questions remain about how to actually evaluate the impacts of collective impact.

Rad Resource:

The Collective Impact Forum is an online hub of information, resources, and peer networking related to collective impact. The searchable resources section includes a host of “Evaluation” resources. One tool is the Guide to Evaluating Collective Impact by Hallie Preskill, Marcie Parkhurst, and Jennifer Splansky Juster. While much of this guide focuses on evaluating the process of collective impact, the third part lists suggested behavior changes and systems changes that may result from collective impact initiatives and provides ideas of indicators and approaches for evaluating these changes.

Lessons Learned:

We have found it critical to remember that collective impact is not necessarily a new concept, but rather one that has emerged from a long tradition of collaborative and coalition practice and thinking. Literature on this topic stretch back more than 30 years, especially in the community psychology field, and includes theory and practical tools for assessing the process and impact of collaborative work.

In particular, the Community Coalition Action Theory developed by Fran Butterfoss and Michelle Kegler synthesizes much of this research to suggest how coalition practices can lead to different kinds of community impacts. These theorized impacts include community change outcomes, such as policy achievement and program expansions; community capacity outcomes, like new skill development and new partnerships; and, over time, the health and social outcomes that are the target of the coalition’s work. Additionally, we have found that Michelle Kegler and Deanne Swan’s efforts to empirically test the relationships in this theory offers especially useful guidance for “connecting the dots” between evaluation of coalition processes, including implementation of collective impact practices, and evaluation of community impacts.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

My name is Courtney Barnard and I am a social worker, coalition coordinator, and program evaluator for a children’s health care system in Fort Worth, Texas.

Lessons Learned: I recently attended a workshop on local children’s health data and racial equity. I quickly realized that, though with good intentions, my colleagues and I often conflate race and ethnicity with other factors, such as poverty, education, and health status. In my community these factors strongly correlate with one another. Not only was I making assumptions about people and data based on these correlations, I was not intentionally analyzing outcomes by race. I was left wondering the impact of the consequences on my data analysis, recommended and implemented strategies, and ultimately the community affected by these decisions.

The Race Matters Institute of Just Partners, Inc. (RMI) seeks to ensure that ALL children, families, and communities thrive. When evaluating the effects of our efforts on the community, we must purposefully do so through a racial equity lens. Using this lens allows us to identify how various factors may affect racial groups with different resources and needs, thus shaping our analysis, recommendations, and strategies.

According to RMI, racial equity results when you cannot predict an outcome by race and when data reveals closing gaps in outcomes. It is quantifiable and measurable. When evaluating community impact through a racial equity lens, we must note:

  1. Attention to racial equity is key to advancing the mission for all community members, unless the stated mission explicitly targets a certain race or ethnicity.
  2. Applying a racial equity lens requires that data be broken apart by race. We must collect data by race and then systematically disaggregate the data in a consistent manner.
  3. Racial equity is about our shared fate as a community. It requires all voices and perspectives from the community be represented, valued, and included in policies and practices.

Rad Resource: The Annie E. Casey Foundation developed the Racial Equity Impact Analysis (REIA), a 5-question tool that can be used to assess any policy, program, or practice (PPP), either existing or proposed. This tool can help identify alterations in said PPP in order to achieve greater results for all community members.

  1. Are all racial/ethnic groups who are affected by the policy/practice/decision at the table?
  2. How will the proposed policy/practice/decision affect each group?
  3. How will the proposed policy/practice/decision be perceived by each group?
  4. Does the policy/practice/decision worsen or ignore existing disparities?
  5. Based on the above responses, what revisions are needed in the policy/practice/decision under discussion?

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

My name is Brian Hoessler, and I am the founder and principal of Strong Roots Consulting in Saskatoon, Canada. Actually, my business cards refer to me as Connector-in-Chief, because that’s how I see my evaluation and research work with non-profits: connecting questions with data, dreams with designs, and plans with reality. I also see my role as helping connect individuals, groups, organizations, and institutions towards a common goal, that of creating better communities for everyone. These two approaches are rooted in my community psychology background – one that emphasizes both an applied approach to social research and working with communities to help address local issues and promote social justice.

Evaluation and community psychology, as applied social research fields, share numerous commonalities: at the same time, they have a lot to offer each other. I hope this post will inspire evaluators to learn a bit more about community psychology, and community psychologists to engage more with the evaluation field!

Hot Tip:

What do collaborative approaches to change (e.g. Collective Impact), participatory and empowering methodologies, and systems thinking have in common? These concepts, growing in popularity in evaluation, were something that I first learned about through community psychology. Community psychology also brings an explicit values focus and a critical perspective, asking not just what’s happening but who’s benefiting and who’s marginalized: for example, Tom Wolff recently shared an engaging critique of the Collective Impact model.

Lesson Learned:

I found myself in the evaluation field initially for the professional development, but what’s kept me engaged are the people. I’ve found that evaluation brings together a diverse range of people from different backgrounds and experiences, including those who wouldn’t identify as an evaluator: instead, we come together out of common interests and purposes. With growing discussions around evaluation’s role in social change, sustainability, and global issues, it’s a field that community psychologists can and should be engaged in!

Rad Resource:

To learn more about the intersection of community psychology and evaluation, check out the Forum on Community Psychology in the American Journal of Evaluation’s March 2015 issue (Volume 36, Issue 1).

For more about community psychology, check out the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), the professional home for community psychology.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Community Psychology (CP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the CP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our CPTIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

Greetings. My name is Tiffeny Jimenez and I identify first as a Community Psychologist (CP). I am also an Assistant Professor of the Community Psychology Doctoral program at National Louis University in Chicago. As a CP, I inherently very quickly identify inequalities, injustices, and potential for collaboration where others may be more likely to see only conflict, and from this perspective, evaluation is a particularly salient and necessary skill set. How else might we judge whether social justice is achieved? It is towards this aim that I take on all inquiry and action. This year, I have had the privilege to be one of this year’s MSI Fellows where I have worked with colleagues towards gaining an in-depth interdisciplinary perspective on the state of our understanding Cultural Competence across Social Work, Health Psychology, Sociology, and Community Psychology. I will speak to the contribution of CP to this focus area.

Lesson Learned: The overall CP framework facilitates cultural competency and humility in all acts of professionalism with explicit emphasis on how we think and why we act in certain ways within a socio-cultural ecological context. CP views cultural competency as cross-cultural awareness assuming we all are interdependent and come to the table with diverse cultural lenses that influence action. Cultural competency is a critical consciousness beyond the acquisition of skills; it’s a way of being in every day interactions that allows for a clearer understanding of one’s own personal place in the world, personal biases, and an understanding that multiple perspectives are present at any one time.

The emphasis of CP is on promoting social justice and identifying the root causes of social problems by changing conditions so diverse populations can thrive individually within a shared geography. Much of the literature on cultural competency centers around: providing in-depth localized case examples of how CPs engage as equal peers with others to address individual and social problems from a culturally grounded perspective; describe adaptations of community programming to meet the needs of underserved populations; discuss the importance of using methods that capture historical context and the voices of less dominant perspectives; emphasize the promotion of dynamic processes within community-level systems rather than individual-level outcomes; and advocate understanding the cultural landscape that undergirds the various policies and practices that perpetuate inequalities and maintain the status quo. Main concepts: power, privilege, structural inequality, decolonizing methodologies, organizational culture, critical consciousness, liberation, indigenous psychologies, divergent cultural practices, and ecological sustainability.

Rad Resources: For more information on being culturally competent, see “Community Psychology: Foundations for Practice” (2015). Particularly Chapter 4 by Kien Lee titled “Effecting Social Change in Diverse Contexts”. The Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice also addresses cultural competency in CP practice from a global perspective: http://www.gjcpp.org/en/article.php?issue=16&article=77

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Greetings readers!  We are Norma Seledon and Susan Ryerson Espino and we are members of the Community Psychology (CP) TIG. Over the past two years, the CP TIG has organized a “Walk the Talk” session at the AEA annual meeting. This is a way to provide members with opportunities to learn more about the conference locale and practice the application of CP principles (such as community engagement and empowerment to evaluation work). In these sessions, we have visited neighborhoods and local community organizations, learned from community members and each other, and provided our host organizations with evaluation support.  

RAD RESOURCE:  Please join us November 12, 2015 for a toxic tour in La Villita.  We will better understand how local activists and community members have been engaged in community environmental justice action to raise awareness and reduce health disparities in Chicago.

La Villita is a historic port of entry for many Latino immigrants, particularly those from Mexico. Poor housing stock and transportation, toxic environmental elements including land, water, and air, dangerous work conditions, and dense neighborhoods with little green space all add to the health disparities impacting the everyday lives of La Villita’s working-class families. The rates of asthma, obesity, teen pregnancy, and poor mental health outcomes in La Villita are among the highest in the city of Chicago.

Staff from The Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO) will guide us through their community.  They will teach us about their activism around environmental justice, criminalization, and gentrification. They will share how they have used culturally relevant popular education and other participatory tactics to engage community members.  We will hear about their powerful environmental justice struggles and witness firsthand how they have reclaimed toxic industrial sites to collaboratively design and enjoy healthy green space. A facilitated conversation will follow on how community psychology-informed evaluation can bolster grassroots action and program refinements.

Join us and other CP TIG members in this mutually-beneficial experience about how evaluation can be used to better serve diverse populations and help reduce health disparities in communities like La Villita. The walk starts at the Hyatt Regency front entrance at 2:00 pm on November 12th. Look for cars with posters stating “Community Psychology and Evaluation Community Tour.”  After the tour we will have a guided discussion, dinner, and the CP TIG business meeting.  We welcome all conference attendees to stay on for all activities.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating CP TIG Week with our colleagues in the Community Psychology Topical Interest Group. The contributions all week come from CP TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

Older posts >>

Archives

To top