AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Social Media Tools & Updates

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. There are many reasons to start blogging: to share your work and strategies for evaluations; to become an evaluation through leader; to become a stronger writer and explain your thoughts—the reasons can be endless. I have compiled a few tips to help you create an effective blog that resonates with your followers.

Creating a Blog

Hot Tip: Content

First, identify themes, concepts, or trends that relate to your audience or other evaluators. What topics will you highlight in your blog and how will your blog stand out? For example, will your blog focus entirely on data visualization, or trends in evaluation? Once this is decided you can start working on the details.

Next, decide how often you are going to blog. Is your blog going to be a daily blog, weekly blog, or monthly blog? When making this decision, you must look at your content resources and your available time. What can you commit to, and how and from what sources are you going to gather your content?

Hot Tip: Writing

When writing a blog, you want to be aware of tone, length, and formatting. Write in a conversational tone, using personal pronouns whenever possible.  You also don’t want your blog to be too long. Typically a blog post is 1,000 words or less.  In addition, you want to break up long paragraphs or text. Try bullet points, numbered lists, or visuals to make your post more interesting.

Hot Tip: Call to Action

An important aspect of blogging is starting a conversation and obtaining your follower’s feedback. Invite your follower’s to provide their opinions or questions in the comments. This allows your post to have a longer shelf life and helps you engage with other evaluators.

I look forward to reading your blogs on evaluation! Please share your tips or questions in the comments.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· · ·

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Facebook is a great tool for reaching other evaluation professionals. The platform makes it easy to share relevant articles, videos, and thoughts with your followers. However, It can be difficult to get your posts on your follower’s newsfeeds because Facebook only shares 12% of your content. You can increase this percentage by writing effective and engaging Facebook posts!

Hot Tip: Keep your post short

Facebook posts should be 1-3 sentences. If a post is too long, a “see more” button will appear. Nine times out of 10 Facebook users will not click on this button and read the rest of your content. Keeping your post short and sweet can make a big difference in engagement.

Hot Tip: Ask you followers to interact

Asking your followers to comment encourages engagement and involvement. You can use this tactic by stating “like this post if you agree” or “share your thoughts in the comments”. Another way to encourage engagement is to ask your followers for advice. This tactic often starts a discussion on your page.

Hot Tip: Make your links compelling

When posting a link to an article on your Facebook page, make sure the link has a compelling photo and interesting title. These are editable fields, meaning you can customize how your link appears. Sometimes links can pull titles and pictures that are not relevant to your content.

Hot Tip: Use different types of posts

Mix up the content formats you are posting to your page. Use a mix of links, pictures, videos, and albums to make your page more interesting.

What are your favorite Facebook tips? Tell us in the comments!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Are you getting the most out of LinkedIn? A complete and active profile allows you to connect with more professionals and expand your network. Try these tips to increase your engagement on LinkedIn.

Untitled design (20)

Hot Tip: Always have a recent (and professional) photo

A profile picture is very important on LinkedIn because it is how you make your first impression. More people are willing to connect with you if you have a picture—a way to put a face with your name.  Use your updated headshot or take a professional photo on your own.

Remember your LinkedIn profile is very different than a Facebook profile. You should avoid using a photo with multiple people, late night photos, photos of your kids, or anything that shows you in a less than professional light.

Hot Tip: Fill out everything and add examples of your work

Make your profile as full as possible! Your resume is supposed to be a 1-2 page summary of your skills, often directly relating to your current position or the one you are applying for. On LinkedIn, you can expand. Add experience that might not fit on your resume.  Add your volunteer experience, your independent course work, or a position that you might not have room for on your resume.

You should also add examples of your work. Share reports, papers, or analysis that you have worked on. This is an excellent way to showcase your skills to your peers and possible employers.

Hot Tip: Make connections

Expand your LinkedIn network and make relevant connections. Search for people with similar interests. You can use keywords, company names, or titles to find people to connect with. You can also reach out to those who are connected with people in your network. LinkedIn will provide a list of recommended connections based on your previous work experience, relationships, and interests. It’s important to have a robust and relevant network, you never know when someone can help you with a project, find a job, or identify a unique opportunity.

Happy Networking!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the community manager for American Evaluation Association and the voice behind the AEA Facebook page.

If you manage a company Facebook page, you might have noticed a drop off of “likes” recently. Facebook has begun removing memorialized and voluntarily deactivated accounts from Pages’ like counts. This change ensures that data on Facebook is consistent and up-to-date—but could mean a drop for your analytics. Although some Pages might lose “likes,” they could also gain a more accurate way to track their followers. I have compiled a few tips for tracking your analytics and gaining more visibility for your page.

Rad Resource: Take advantage of Facebook “Insights”

Facebook offers Page Insights after at least 30 people have liked your Page. Use this tool to understand how people are engaging with your Page. With this tool, you can see your Page’s growth, learn which posts have the most engagement, find demographic information about your audience, and identify when your audience is using Facebook.  This data is available for free and can easily be customizable for time frame and downloaded to excel.

Rad Resource:  Use Google Analytics to track effectiveness

Tracking your analytics through Google allows you to see how many people are coming to your site from social networks, understand the website pages they are most interested in, and gain a better understanding for how your audience is engaging with your web content.  To find this information, enter your Google analytics account and go to “Acquisitions”. From here you can look at the performance of your social networks as an overview or look more specifically at referrals, activity, and user flow. All of this data allows you to gage the effectiveness of your social campaigns.

Hot Tips: Increase your Facebook likes

Finally here are a few simple tips for increasing the likes on your Facebook Page—hopefully you can make up for any followers you lost when Facebook made their changes.

  • Add the Facebook icon to your website, so visitors know you have a presence on the social network (Place the icon high on the website page, near your navigation)
  • Add the Facebook icon to your email communication or blog to reiterate your presence on Facebook to your subscribers
  • Cross promote your Facebook page on your other social media sites. You may have followers on Twitter that have not liked your Facebook page or didn’t know you had a Page

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· · · ·

I have written about the benefits of Pinterest in past AEA365 posts, but now I want to help you get started! Pinterest is a great resource for identifying visual trends in evaluation—it’s also pretty fun to use for your personal life.

First let’s understand the language:

Pin: Pins are visual bookmarks that you collect on boards. You can save Pins you find on the Pinterest site or add new ones from your favorite websites or personal computer.

Boards: Boards are where you save your Pins. You can make boards for anything and everything.

Follow All: When you select “Follow all” you choose to follow all of someone’s boards, meaning all their boards are shown to you in real-time on your Pinterest Home Page.

Follow Board: When you select “Follow board” you choose to follow and see updates on just one board from the individual’s profile.

How to Join: Just go to Pinterest.com and click on the prompt to “Join.” () You can use your Facebook login to create an account or just develop a user name and password. If you use your Facebook account, the two platforms will be connected and your Facebook followers will be able to see your pins. Once you create an account, Pinterest will ask you to create a profile, where you can add a photo.

Create a Board: Go to your profile and select the icon that says “Create a board.” This will open a form that prompts you for the name of your board, description, and category.  People make boards for all sorts of topics and interests.  Fo r example, data visualization info graphics, or even DIY all make great options for a board—the possibilities are endless.

Pintrest Create Board

 

Add a Pin: Now comes the fun part—you can start pinning images to your boards! To find interesting images, you can either search for a specific topic by keyword, or choose a topic from the drop down selection (located on the end of the search bar). Select “Home Feed” from the drop down box to see the pins of others you are following.

Search Home Feed

Once you find a pin that you like, hit the “Pin it” button at the top of the image.  This will allow you to select the board you wish to pin the image to. Now if you visit your profile, you will see the image on your board and the source of the image for more information.

Add Pin

 

You can also add pins from the web, by adding the Pinterest button to your browser or upload your own images from your computer.

If you want to save an image but not necessarily add it to a board, you can like the image.

Dive right in: Pinterest can be a bit overwhelming at first, by just dive in. You will soon discover how intuitive it is to create boards, add pins, and browse the unlimited pins available on Pinterest.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

No tags

Managing multiple social media channels for your business or personal use can be difficult because each social channel is on a separate site. Managing these sites can take a lot of time out of your day, that’s why I use Hootsuite to manage AEA’s social channels, including Twitter and Facebook. Hootsuite is a social media management tool that helps you monitor your social channels and track what people are saying in the field. I have compiled a few ways you can benefit from Hootsuite!

social

Rad Resource: Monitor multiple channels in one place

The best feature of Hootsuite is that it allows you to manage multiple social media streams on one dashboard.  The tool allows you to view:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook Profiles, Events, Groups, and Pages
  • LinkedIn Profiles, Pages, and Groups
  • Google+ Pages (currently not personal profiles)
  • Foursquare

You can post and monitor your social media pages all from this one tool. You can even post the same content across multiple platforms. However be careful here—your Facebook fans and Twitter followers may have different needs. Also, Twitter only allows 140 characters whereas Facebook allows much longer and richer posts with photos and videos.

Rad Resource: Schedule Posts

The scheduling feature on Hootsuite is very beneficial especially for the busy professional who still wants to have a presence on real time social conversations. Hootsuite allows you to determine the time, date, and channel for your post. We recommend not posting too far in advance in order to stay relevant with your followers.

Hot Tool: Customize your dashboard

Hootsuite allows you to customize the information you see about each of your social media channels.  For example, if you add your Twitter account to Hootsuite, you can customize the dashboard to view your newsfeed, mentions from other twitter users, your tweets, new followers, retweets, scheduled tweets, and the list goes on. This allows you to see all the pieces of information that are truly relevant to your needs.

Rad Resource: Monitor topics and hashtags

In addition to creating streams for your social media channels, you can create streams for keywords and hashtags which allow you to follow conversations in the field. By simply choosing “add stream” then select “search” or “keywords” you can enter keywords, phrases, or popular hashtags. Follow words such as evaluation, eval, data visualization, or #dataviz. Hootsuite will show you all of the tweets and posts related to this theme or topic. This is a great way to stay on top of the latest conversations in the field.

Click here to learn more about getting started on Hootsuite.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· · · ·

Venturing into social media can be a daunting task since the various platforms are growing so quickly. Developing a checklist can be an easy way to get started in social media and organize your social strategy and routine.

I have outlined a few ways you can start developing your social media checklist.

3Hot Tip Icon

 Define your audience

Identifying your target audience on social media is important. It’s easy to say that you want to target anyone or everyone who is willing to give you a like or retweet, but is this really aiding your social media goals or purpose and is your content being used effectively?

By identifying who you want to target—whether that group is students, evaluation professionals, non-profit workers, or those focused in data—you can create targeted content that will be more valuable for your followers and result in a higher return on investment for your social strategy. You can start with the basic demographics questions: age, occupation and education. Then you can identify their interests.

3Hot Tip Icon

Develop a content strategy

It’s important to develop some sort of content strategy when venturing into social media so you can stay relevant with your audience. This helps you stay on track and keeps you from sharing anything and everything. Once you have identified what your audience is looking for, you can develop posts that match their needs.  Important questions to ask yourself when developing content are:

What is important to your audience?

What are their questions or concerns?

What do they want to learn more about?

3Hot Tip Icon

Set up your check list for each channel

Once you are ready to start posting, you can set up your personal checklist and scheduling guide which will help you reach your activity goals. Below are a few examples:

Facebook

  • Publish 1 post each day
  • Dedicate two days each week to blog content from evaluation sources
  • Monitor and respond to comments once a week
  • Review insights at the end of every month

Twitter

  • Publish twice daily
  • Retweet relevant content to your followers twice a week
  • Follow 15 new and relevant users or organizations each week
  • Follow industry hashtags once a week

These are just a few examples. You can create a checklist that works with your schedule and social goals.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· · ·

Hello, my name is Jayne Corso.  I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association (AEA).

Pinterest is a wonderful tool for creating shopping lists and finding great DYI projects, but did you also know that it is a useful resource for finding interesting data visuals and info graphics? After all, Pinterest is a place to go to be inspired and to share ideas with others. In my initial post about Pinterest, I have listed some steps for starting your journey on the tool and finding ways to use Pinterest for motivation.

Rad Resources: How it Works

When you create a Pinterest profile, you have the ability to create boards that relate to your particular interests. Boards allow you to keep all of your related pins together and help you stay organized by subject matter. I’ve used my Pinterest profile below as an example:

pinterest baord

Use the search bar at the top to search keywords focused on your interests. I suggest searching for data visualization, presentations, research, and evaluation. These keywords will pull images, info graphics, research examples, presentation tips, and much more, which have been pinned on Pinterest by other users.

When you find an image you like, pin it to a board!  After you select pin, the site will prompt you to choose a board or create a new board. Now all of your related pins are in one place that you can easily reference.

pin exampkle     pin exampkle.png2

Rad Resource: Follow others on Pinterest

Similar to other social media sites, you can look people up by their names and follow them. When you follow someone, you get notified when they add items to their boards and their activity is shown in your news stream. Some of your favorite evaluators are already pinning on Pinterest including Kylie Hutchinson, Ann Emery, Stephanie Evergreen, and Chris Lysy.

You can also follow boards. If you come across a Pinterest board created by a user that you find particularly fascinating, you can follow that board and you will be notified when something gets added.

follow board

Rad Resource: Be Inspired

The greatest aspect of Pinterest is that you can be inspired by the work of others and keep a keen eye on trends within evaluations, research, and presentation. Pinterest encourages you to think creatively and find the best format for your evaluation or data.

AEA is interested in joining Pinterest. Tell us in the comments if this is something you would enjoy and find as a useful resource for your evaluations and projects!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

Hello, my name is Dan McDonnell and I am a Community Manager at the American Evaluation Association (AEA). Facebook recently announced a couple of key changes to its user experience – one that has already taken place, and another on the horizon – and I wanted to share how that may impact how you use the social network. Both changes focuseon how you interact with and receive content from Fan Pages that you like, and ultimately seek to give you a better user experience on the platform.

The first change took place on November 5th, and saw Facebook removing the ‘Like-Gate’ feature available to Fan Page owners. Ever seen posts or ads that invite you to ‘Like’ a page on Facebook to receive access to unique content or to enter a contest? No more! Facebook felt that by allowing Page owners to entice people to like their pages through artificial incentives (enter for a chance to win a free iPad!) created a poor user experience, lessening the likelihood that those who ‘Liked’ pages would actually engage with the company or brand. Like-Gating is history.

The second change will hit Facebook in January 2015, and will change the way in which the algorithm that informs the posts in your Facebook News Feed handles organic (non-paid) posts from Fan pages. In the past year, Facebook has placed an increased focus on promoted posts and pages, and encouraged companies and brands to spend money to get into user’s news feeds. Further limiting the amount of non-paid posts from Fan pages that will be served in your news feeds is Facebook’s way of doubling down on this strategy. You’ll soon see less clutter and spam from Fan Pages you like, and the posts you do see will likely be advertisements or promoted posts – subject to Facebook’s rigorous guidelines to ensure relevancy.

All in all, it seems that these changes are mostly a net positive for users of Facebook, and create some challenges (and opportunities) for companies and brands who manage Fan pages on Facebook. What do you think of these changes?

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

<< Latest posts

Archives

To top