Calling all aea365 readers: What do YOU want to read more about in 2019? by Sheila B Robinson

Hello Loyal aea365 readers! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with one question for you: What is it that YOU would like to read about on this blog?

I first posted this article in 2015 (and every year since) and we receive excellent responses from readers each time it is published. I typically share responses in a subsequent post and as a result we receive blog articles on some of the suggested topics from authors willing to answer the call. Here we go again with some minor updates to reflect the times:

Lesson Learned: AEA365 has been going steadily since January 1, 2010 with 3200+ contributions (Wow!) from hundreds of evaluators across the globe. We accept individual submissions at aea365@eval.org on a rolling basis, along with inquiries about sponsored or themed weeks. Posts are about any and all evaluation-related topics, and anyone with something to share with fellow evaluators is welcome to contribute! If you are interested in sharing a tip, please be sure to check out our *updated* contribution guidelines here.

As a key learning tool for evaluation, aea365 can also be a fabulous vehicle for promoting evaluation and evidence-based policy. With that in mind, we would like to include your voice as we head into the new year as our aea365 team considers inviting authors and groups to contribute.

Hot Tip: Let’s crowdsource some ideas for aea365 in 2019 and make it the best year ever.

Please let us know what you would like to see in aea365 by responding to these questions in the comments (click the word “Comments” just under the title of the post and scroll down to add yours*):

1. What do YOU want to read or learn more about on aea365 in 2018?

2. Who do YOU want to hear from on this blog?

Thanks very much for your input and your loyal readership.

*Please note that your comments may not appear immediately, but rest assured, we will see them! An aea365 curator must approve incoming comments before they appear publicly.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

4 thoughts on “Calling all aea365 readers: What do YOU want to read more about in 2019? by Sheila B Robinson”

  1. I would like to see how other evaluators are evaluating (a) professional development aimed at improving college or K12 teaching practice, (b) culture change in departments in higher education.

    I would also like to see more “reviews” — bringing my attention to reports or synthesis studies on evaluation that give “big messages” and not just examples from individual program evaluations.

  2. I would like the AEA Board to be more transparent with their discussions (policy and it’s implementation) and with election results (number of members who voted, vote counts for all candidates including the president. AEA is its membership and membership should be informed and up to date on all matters. AEA 365 would be an excellent forum.

  3. I would love to learn more about how people have transformed their own processes to make evaluation results be more actionable; how people have approached difficult conversations to ensure the beneficiaries of services are considered as critical stakeholders in evaluation projects; and best data visualization practices for sharing data with youth!

  4. Hello,
    I’d like to learn more about how community groups and agencies have built evaluation capacity in their own settings. I think it is a long process, and it would be interersting to hear from people at different stages, or retrospective descriptions of the process.

    I’d also like to hear more about evaluations of programs developed for, with, and by people with disabilities. Also would like to hear from people who have disabilities and are working as evaluators.

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