AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

With so many different social media platforms to choose from (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram…) it can be hard to identify the platform that works best for your content and the people you are trying to reach with your message. I have outlined a few insights on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest that could help you determine where your content fits in on the social media spectrum.

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Hot Tip: Facebook

The most prominent age group on Facebook ranges between 25-34 years of age. This is closely followed by 35-44. Facebook requires unique content which can come in the form of photos, links, or videos. It is often difficult to re-purpose content on Facebook, because of the longevity of a post. However, the benefit to Facebook post longevity is that you do not have to post as often as other platforms, such as Twitter.  Depending on your desired activity, Facebook posts can occur a few times a week versus every day.

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Hot Tip: Twitter

Twitter and Facebook are very similar in terms of activity users. Twitter also attracts 25-34 years of age  followed closely by 35-44. The main difference with Twitter, is the life of the post. Twitter is saturated with content, which means your post might only be seen for a limited amount of time before it is pushed to the bottom of a news feed. Due to this short post lifespan, to use Twitter effectively, you need lots of content! Content should be posted to Twitter every day. This content should be a mix of original and shared (retweeted) posts.

Twitter is a great platform for re-purposing your content. Because of a Twitter post’s lifespan, you can repost the same or similar content multiple times to capture the best engagement.

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Hot Tip: LinkedIn

LinkedIn captures a similar age group as Twitter and Facebook, however the active users tend to be more professional and with some type of higher education. LinkedIn is a great place to post content that is relevant to education, career advancement, and research. The active users on LinkedIn are motivated by career goals and professional networking. Content for LinkedIn should be unique similar to Facebook.

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Hot Tip: Pinterest

Pinterest is by far dominated by women. To be successful on this platform you must have an archive of photos or visuals to choose from. Pins that are posted to Pinterest have a long shelf life, due to the active sharing and re-pinning of content. Pinterest is a great tool for sharing your data visualization examples!

I hope this blog provides a better understanding of each platform and helps you decide where to take your content. Use the comments below to share your thoughts.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Jennifer Rosinski and I’m a Senior Marketing Manager at UMass Medical School’s Commonwealth Medicine division. My team uses social media channels (e.g., Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook) to reach global audiences across all social strata. Connecting with audiences through social media can help build your brand, share your expertise, and foster connections.

Social media is a quick, low-cost, high-impact way to spread the word about your organization’s major achievements and accomplishments. Twitter and LinkedIn, in particular, have become go-to places to share the latest research and knowledge in diverse fields from health care to financial management. In the evaluation world, social media can easily be used not only to disseminate project findings, but to share resources, recruit study participants, mobilize populations for community engagement activities, seek input on the development of tools, and much more.

Hot Tips:

  • Post publications you author, including journal articles, technical reports, blogs, and posters. Make sure these are public and the publisher has no restrictions. Our practice transformation expert Joan Johnston shared her poster about optimizing cervical cancer screening.
  • Share media coverage in which your organization is mentioned. This helps spread the message to a wider group. Make sure to mention any partners with whom you’ve worked so they can share it, too. The Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services shared our Tweet about news coverage of the Silver Alert Emergency Response Program partnership.
  • Like and share items posted on LinkedIn that have relevance to your field, or that highlight your work. Our pharmacists liked a post in our LinkedIn group about their conference posters.
  • Talk about awards, appointments or other accolades. Our Clinical Pharmacy Manager Kimberly Lenz shares her excitement in a Tweet about being appointed to a public advisory council.
  • Comment on news others share. One of our autism advocates, Elaine Gabovitch, elaborated on a poster that was posted in our LinkedIn group.
  • Tweet from conferences you attend or host. Here, Warren Ferguson, founder of the Academic & Health Policy Conference on Correctional Health supported by UMass Medical School, shares that a speaker is addressing mental health in criminal justice.

LinkedIn

  1. Connect with your colleagues (past and present), clients, partners
  2. Follow groups – employers, alma maters, interest areas
  3. Keep your profile up-to-date with new accomplishments

Twitter

  1. Learn how to appropriately abbreviate – 140 characters can be challenging; typos are easy!
  2. Use other Twitter handles in your tweets to let others know you are talking about them.
  3. Include relevant hashtags in your tweets. These searchable keywords increase your post’s visibility.

Rad Resources:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi – We are Michelle Cerrone and Daniel Light and we are researchers at EDC on an NSF-funded project, Twitter and Informal Science Learning and Engagement (TwISLE) that is exploring how adults use Twitter to engage with institutions like museums, zoos, and government science agencies.

For TwISLE we’ve interviewed and surveyed Twitter science enthusiasts around the country, and have learned a lot about the realities of recruiting research participants via Twitter. NASA may have 5 million Twitter followers, but getting ten to take a survey was harder than expected!

The networked world is full of noise and recruitment is not just getting someone’s attention, but also fostering a connection – even a minimal one. We have learned to use the cultural norms of Twitter to help us out.

Lesson Learned #1: Request to follow the people you are interested in talking to. For the initial set of interviews we identified frequent “retweeters” of science-related tweets and then tweeted interview invitations to dozens of them. But, we got no replies. After a bit more experimenting, we found that we got far more responses by sending invites through Twitter’s direct message system. The only catch is that in order to send a direct message, that person must be following you. We found it surprisingly easy to get someone to follow us – we just had to follow them first! Even though people followed us back without knowing who we were, once they are a follower people are more willing to consider speaking with us.

Lesson Learned #2: Survey requests need to come from a trusted and connected account. It was actually easier to recruit for interviews than for a 5-minute survey! For our first survey, we tweeted 10-15 invites a day for two weeks to @NASA, and multiple hashtag conversations about science-related events (i.e. #EarthDay or #plutoflyby). Only 6 people took the survey. Since then, we get science organizations to tweet out the invitation and we get better responses. Recently, a natural history museum working with us got 130 completed surveys after three invites.

Lesson Learned #3: Survey recruitment needs multiple and well-timed tweet invites. First, you need to tweet the invite multiple times since you never know when people are looking and have time to take a survey. But there is an even more important aspect of timing that will impact your sample. These science organizations have large and diverse followings; events going on in the real world influence which segment of their followers are looking at Twitter. For a zoo we worked with, half of the survey responses came in the night of a gala fundraiser and our sample over-represented the highly educated science professionals who support the zoo’s science research.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the community manager for American Evaluation Association and the voice behind the AEA Facebook page.

If you manage a company Facebook page, you might have noticed a drop off of “likes” recently. Facebook has begun removing memorialized and voluntarily deactivated accounts from Pages’ like counts. This change ensures that data on Facebook is consistent and up-to-date—but could mean a drop for your analytics. Although some Pages might lose “likes,” they could also gain a more accurate way to track their followers. I have compiled a few tips for tracking your analytics and gaining more visibility for your page.

Rad Resource: Take advantage of Facebook “Insights”

Facebook offers Page Insights after at least 30 people have liked your Page. Use this tool to understand how people are engaging with your Page. With this tool, you can see your Page’s growth, learn which posts have the most engagement, find demographic information about your audience, and identify when your audience is using Facebook.  This data is available for free and can easily be customizable for time frame and downloaded to excel.

Rad Resource:  Use Google Analytics to track effectiveness

Tracking your analytics through Google allows you to see how many people are coming to your site from social networks, understand the website pages they are most interested in, and gain a better understanding for how your audience is engaging with your web content.  To find this information, enter your Google analytics account and go to “Acquisitions”. From here you can look at the performance of your social networks as an overview or look more specifically at referrals, activity, and user flow. All of this data allows you to gage the effectiveness of your social campaigns.

Hot Tips: Increase your Facebook likes

Finally here are a few simple tips for increasing the likes on your Facebook Page—hopefully you can make up for any followers you lost when Facebook made their changes.

  • Add the Facebook icon to your website, so visitors know you have a presence on the social network (Place the icon high on the website page, near your navigation)
  • Add the Facebook icon to your email communication or blog to reiterate your presence on Facebook to your subscribers
  • Cross promote your Facebook page on your other social media sites. You may have followers on Twitter that have not liked your Facebook page or didn’t know you had a Page

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Managing multiple social media channels for your business or personal use can be difficult because each social channel is on a separate site. Managing these sites can take a lot of time out of your day, that’s why I use Hootsuite to manage AEA’s social channels, including Twitter and Facebook. Hootsuite is a social media management tool that helps you monitor your social channels and track what people are saying in the field. I have compiled a few ways you can benefit from Hootsuite!

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Rad Resource: Monitor multiple channels in one place

The best feature of Hootsuite is that it allows you to manage multiple social media streams on one dashboard.  The tool allows you to view:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook Profiles, Events, Groups, and Pages
  • LinkedIn Profiles, Pages, and Groups
  • Google+ Pages (currently not personal profiles)
  • Foursquare

You can post and monitor your social media pages all from this one tool. You can even post the same content across multiple platforms. However be careful here—your Facebook fans and Twitter followers may have different needs. Also, Twitter only allows 140 characters whereas Facebook allows much longer and richer posts with photos and videos.

Rad Resource: Schedule Posts

The scheduling feature on Hootsuite is very beneficial especially for the busy professional who still wants to have a presence on real time social conversations. Hootsuite allows you to determine the time, date, and channel for your post. We recommend not posting too far in advance in order to stay relevant with your followers.

Hot Tool: Customize your dashboard

Hootsuite allows you to customize the information you see about each of your social media channels.  For example, if you add your Twitter account to Hootsuite, you can customize the dashboard to view your newsfeed, mentions from other twitter users, your tweets, new followers, retweets, scheduled tweets, and the list goes on. This allows you to see all the pieces of information that are truly relevant to your needs.

Rad Resource: Monitor topics and hashtags

In addition to creating streams for your social media channels, you can create streams for keywords and hashtags which allow you to follow conversations in the field. By simply choosing “add stream” then select “search” or “keywords” you can enter keywords, phrases, or popular hashtags. Follow words such as evaluation, eval, data visualization, or #dataviz. Hootsuite will show you all of the tweets and posts related to this theme or topic. This is a great way to stay on top of the latest conversations in the field.

Click here to learn more about getting started on Hootsuite.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Venturing into social media can be a daunting task since the various platforms are growing so quickly. Developing a checklist can be an easy way to get started in social media and organize your social strategy and routine.

I have outlined a few ways you can start developing your social media checklist.

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 Define your audience

Identifying your target audience on social media is important. It’s easy to say that you want to target anyone or everyone who is willing to give you a like or retweet, but is this really aiding your social media goals or purpose and is your content being used effectively?

By identifying who you want to target—whether that group is students, evaluation professionals, non-profit workers, or those focused in data—you can create targeted content that will be more valuable for your followers and result in a higher return on investment for your social strategy. You can start with the basic demographics questions: age, occupation and education. Then you can identify their interests.

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Develop a content strategy

It’s important to develop some sort of content strategy when venturing into social media so you can stay relevant with your audience. This helps you stay on track and keeps you from sharing anything and everything. Once you have identified what your audience is looking for, you can develop posts that match their needs.  Important questions to ask yourself when developing content are:

What is important to your audience?

What are their questions or concerns?

What do they want to learn more about?

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Set up your check list for each channel

Once you are ready to start posting, you can set up your personal checklist and scheduling guide which will help you reach your activity goals. Below are a few examples:

Facebook

  • Publish 1 post each day
  • Dedicate two days each week to blog content from evaluation sources
  • Monitor and respond to comments once a week
  • Review insights at the end of every month

Twitter

  • Publish twice daily
  • Retweet relevant content to your followers twice a week
  • Follow 15 new and relevant users or organizations each week
  • Follow industry hashtags once a week

These are just a few examples. You can create a checklist that works with your schedule and social goals.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso. I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and I manage AEA’s social media presence (@aeaweb). This past week at Evaluation 2014, our event hashtag (#eval14) took on a life of its own and racked up a total of 5,601 tweets thanks to your postings, retweets, and replies. In this post, I’d like to share a few exciting trends and stats that we noticed over the course of the week.

The following data points reflect Tweets sent with the #eval14 hashtag from Monday, October 13 – Sunday, October 19

Impact: 3,707,835—This is the potential number of times someone could have seen #eval14 hashtag on their Tweet stream.

506 Contributors—This number refers to the number of twitter users that sent tweets or retweets using the #eval14 hashtag.

Our twitter community was very active throughout the conference, especially on Friday, October 17. (Click image to enlarge) 

AEA tWITTER GRAPH

Thank you to all of our 506 twitter contributors! You helped AEA keep the conference relevant on twitter and we loved seeing your original tweets. (Click image to enlarge) 

Most Active Contributors:

  1. @StrongRoots_SK
  2. @KatHaugh
  3. @Broadleafc
  4. @InnoNet_Eval
  5. @KimFLeonard

Most Popular Contributors:

  1. @Education_AIR
  2. @TechChange
  3. @NPCthinks
  4. @BillNigh
  5. @FSGtweets

Aea top tweeters

 

Here are a few great tweets we collected from this week’s festivities. Thank you for helping AEA take over twitter for Evaluation2014!

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association (AEA). As the voice behind AEA’s Twitter presence (@aeaweb), I am always looking for new ways to connect with evaluators and surface online conversations focused on evaluation. I recently came across a tool called Riffle that is instrumental in helping to identify twitter users who are interested in evaluation and trending topics.

Riffle turns your browser into a pop-up informative Twitter analytics platform and allows you to quickly research users and read up on their Twitter habits. When you download Riffle (it’s probably easiest to add as a Google Chrome browser extension), a small triangular icon will appear on the right side of your browser. When you click this icon, Riffle will open up a sidebar that will allow you to search individual Twitter users. For example, if you search @aeaweb in Riffle, here’s what you’ll see:

Eval Riffle

When you’re looking at your home feed on Twitter, you’ll notice the Riffle icon now appears next to each Twitter user’s handle. Simply click     that icon and the sidebar will pull up their Riffle information.

Rad Resource: Expand your Twitter community

If you type a user name into the search bar, such as @aeaweb, you can easily see who AEA is mentioning in posts. As you can see, AEA often mentions @clysy (Chris Lysy), @evalu8r (Stephanie Evergreen), and @bettereval (Better Evaluation). All of these users are highly focused on evaluation best practices and are folks that we’d recommend you follow! Take Riffle one step further and search one of the usernames in AEA top mentions to find out who they follow.

Rad Resource: Uncover new trends

Similar to top mentions, the tool also returns the top hashtags used in Tweets by the Twitter user you search. Let’s look at another example, when you search for @evalu8r in Riffle, you can see that Stephanie Evergreen commonly uses these hashtags: #dataviz #eval #p2i #eval14. You’ve just found four evaluation focused hashtags that you can begin following on Twitter, opening the door to some great new content and information that you may have been missing in the past. You’ll find it easier to stay up-to-date on new trends in evaluation through reading these hashtags and participate in online conversations by using the hashtags in your own tweets.

Hot Tip: Get ready for Evaluation 2014

If you are joining us at Evaluation 2014, keep an eye on the #eval14  hashtag for the most up-to-date information about the event. Also use the hashtag in your Tweets to share your experiences, conference photos, or to connect with other attendees. We look forward to seeing you in Denver!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Dan McDonnell and I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association. With the vast amount of different social analytics and measurement tools that exist – particularly for Twitter – it can be time consuming to research the ins and outs.  Today, I’ll be giving a brief overview of a handful of tools, in a quick hits-like format to help you find the best tools to enhance your use of social media – without the need for hours of research!

Rad Resource: Twazzup – Evaluate Hashtag Data
Twazzup lets you dig into keyword or hashtag data on Twitter with a quick search. While the typical Twitter search just returns the most recent (and popular) related Tweets, Twazzup pulls a list of the top influencers who Tweet with your searched term – a great way to find new, interesting people to follow.

Rad Resource: Commun.it – Manage Your Network

Commun.it makes it easy to keep in touch with your Twitter followers by providing helpful suggestions. In addition to daily insights, Commun.it reminds you to @reply to followers, and updates you on suggested people to follow or unfollow based on recent activity. With one click, you can give a shout out to your top followers to say ‘Thanks!’

Rad Resource: Topsy – Listen Better

Topsy is like Google Alerts, but for Twitter. Set up monitoring filters to comb Twitter and email you updates on when certain keywords or hashtags are mentioned. It’s a great way to get by the minute updates on a particular topic on Twitter. Quick tip – set up a topsy mention to monitor your blog URL, so you can see when people link to you on Twitter!

Rad Resource: Buffer + Feed.ly – Share Cool Stories on Twitter, Later!

I’ve mentioned Buffer before, but I thought it worth mentioning again in tandem with Feed.ly, an RSS feed reader, as it’s one of my favorite tool combinations. Add your favorite blogs and feeds to Feed.ly, and if you have a Buffer account set up (on your PC or your phone), a Buffer Icon will appear as a share icon below each post in the feed. Simply click the Buffer button on any article that you want to share on Twitter, and Buffer will let you customize your Tweet, and automatically schedule it to go out at a later time. It takes just two clicks to share each news item, blog post or story with your network, so this is a tremendous time saver.

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Hello, my name is Dan McDonnell and I am a Community Manager at the American Evaluation Association (AEA). In the fast-paced world of social media, things are always changing. Just as soon as you stop to take a breath, Facebook has tweaked its algorithm again. Or Twitter has updated its design. Recently, there have been a slew of changes that hit just about every major social network, and I thought I’d take the opportunity to give a few quick hits on what’s new, and how and how it affects evaluation professionals.

Hot Tip: Facebook Design Changes & More

Do you run a Facebook fan page? Facebook took a cue from Twitter who recently gave a facelift to the layout of fan pages. As of June 5th, the size of fan page  cover photo images has been adjusted to now require 851 x 315 pixels. In addition, Facebook removed what used to be called ‘page tabs’, replacing them with a simple menu of the major sections of your page – Timeline, About, Photos, Likes and More.

If the above changes weren’t enough, Facebook also gave users more freedom to customize the leftmost column of their fan page. Want your page ‘Reviews’ to be front and center? You can do that now! The entire left sidebar can be ordered entirely to your liking.

Hot Tip: Google + Authorship Limited

Remember that post I made a few months ago about Google Authorship? Well, it turns out, Google changed the game when it rolled out some major changes this week. While Google Authorship still exists, the biggest benefits have now been removed. Unfortunately, pictures are no longer supported in Google search results, nor will the author’s Google + circle information be shared. Now, if Authorship is correctly implemented into a blog post, only the name of the author will be added to the search result. Bummer.

Hot Tip: LinkedIn Premium Gets an Update

LinkedIn has become an essential tool for job seekers these days, as well as an excellent way to network. For the power users of the world, LinkedIn has a service called LinkedIn Premium, which I would highly recommend to anyone actively in job search mode. It’s a bit pricey though at $23.99 or $47.99 a month options, but with the addition of LinkedIn Premium Spotlight, a starter package that runs at just $7.99 a month, evaluation professionals can enjoy many enhanced benefits of LinkedIn without breaking the bank.

With Premium Spotlight, LinkedIn will make your profile stand out more among search listings, offer you suggestions for keywords to include in your profile to make yourself more visible for hiring managers and more. Check it out!

Hot Tip: Twitter Changes Fonts

Ok, so unless you’re a Helvetica purist, this one isn’t too big of a deal. Back on May 30th, Twitter angered (or delighted, depending on who you ask) font geeks around the world by changing the default typeface of Tweets from Helvetica Neue to Gotham. Some users have reported that the new font makes it more difficult to read, while others have embraced it fully. What’s your take?

Twitter Font Change

Twitter Font Change

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Dan McDonnell on Google + | Dan McDonnell on Twitter

 

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