AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | storyboarding

I’m Tara Gregory, Research and Evaluation Coordinator for Wichita State University’s Center for Community Support and Research (CCSR). CCSR works with non-profit, community and faith-based organizations across Kansas and was originally supported through the Community Psychology graduate program at Wichita State University. Many of our staff members, myself included, are graduates of this program so we’ve maintained a strong community psychology orientation in our principles and practices. Given the principle of meeting people where they are, we often use forms of storytelling to help organizations develop logic models

We use the following techniques to facilitate creative discussion while still attending to the elements in a traditional logic model. These processes encourage participation by multiple staff, administrators and stakeholders and can use the organization’s vision or impact statement as the “happily ever after.”

Hot Tip: Script writing: We ask participants to think of their program and it’s outcomes in terms of a movie trilogy. In small groups, they create scripts for each part of the trilogy then report out on the significant scenes (much like they would if they were describing a movie they’d just seen). These scenes inform the elements of their logic model, which we typically help them to complete later, and could be focused on the individual or other contexts (e.g., community). We specifically ask them to think of Part 1 as the story of what people experience while involved in the program; Part 2 picks up at a later date (the specific timeframe depends on the program) and reflects the progression of outcomes; and Part 3 represents the transition to “happily ever after.”

The specific questions we ask participants to address in their scripts are:

  • Who are the characters, settings or contexts?
  • What do they experience/what happens to them?
  • What actions do they take as a result?

Hot Tip: Pictorial timeline: Using a similar process to script writing, we ask participants to envision one of their clients, then to draw the activities and resulting behaviors or conditions that occur at various points along a timeline. This approach offers a visual path toward “happily ever after.”

Lessons Learned:

  • Participants are less likely to get bogged down in concerns about the “right” way to fill out a logic model and are better able to identify outcomes, including those that are unintended or less positive, than with traditional methods.
  • Whereas completing the typical logic model matrix can be intimidating for some, these processes tend to be energizing and fun
  • These techniques work particularly well with organizations that are innovative and are open to playfulness and experimentation.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365, an occasional series. The contributions for Best of aea365 are reposts of great blog articles from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, we are Osman Ozturgut, assistant professor, University of the Incarnate Word, Tamara Bertrand Jones, assistant professor, Florida State University, and Cindy Crusto, associate professor, Yale School of Medicine. We are members of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group.  We’d like to update you on our conference session.

The goals of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group include increasing awareness about the Statement and the resources available to increase use and application, regardless of the type of evaluation. In light of these goals, the working group formed a sub-group to prepare modules to be used in teaching evaluation. As its first task, this group has designed a curriculum module to introduce the Statement and its relevance to the field of education.

In this conference session, we sought feedback from the participants about the use of video in our module related to use, relevance, and practically. The significance of multimedia resources in evaluation is unquestionable. Whether we are designing or presenting the results to the stakeholders, effective use of multimedia can determine the appropriate next steps. Participants expressed their thoughts on the design’s effectiveness and provided suggestions that would increase utilization by academics and evaluation trainers.

First, we wanted to limit the first module’s video to 8-10 minutes so that it would serve as an introductory module and provide insights on the significance of the Statement and the definition and practice of cultural competence in evaluation. This video would include testimonials from experts on the significance of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation. These statements would include the meaning of culture and cultural competency in evaluation and how evaluations reflect culture. The second part of the module would include accounts on the significance of acknowledging the complexity of cultural identity, recognizing the dynamics of power, identifying and eliminating bias in language, and employing culturally appropriate methods.

Next, we sought feedback on how we could effectively design such a video that uses time efficiently.

Lesson Learned: Participants’ feedback confirmed that a more structured approach, in the initial design phase, such as creating a storyboard when designing the video, would be important. Yes, this step may be time-consuming, but it is important to spend the time in advance to help disseminate the significance of cultural competency in evaluation. We are more than willing to take the challenge of learning new-to-us technologies!

Rad Resources: Storyboard is the next step once you have the concept and the script. It tells the story frame-by-frame, and is a great resource to begin the adventure!

Clipped from http://www.storyboardthat.com/

This week, we’re diving into issues of Cultural Competence in Evaluation with AEA’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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