AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | social media

Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for the AEA. LinkedIn stands out as the social platform for professional development and industry sharing. It is a great resource for presenting yourself as an experienced evaluator as well as finding resources and networking opportunities that will benefit your practice and strategies. I have compiled a few tips that will help you create a stronger personal profile, and identified LinkedIn resources.

Hot Tip: Enhance your Profile

Go beyond just including a photo, work experience, and education – really enhance your profile by including your publications, skills, awards, independent course work, volunteer experience, or organizations you belong to. All of these features allow you to have a robust, well-rounded profile and will highlight your expertise as an evaluator.

Hot Tip: Use key words

Create a list of keywords that accurately communicate your expertise. For example, evaluation, visual data, statistics, research, and monitoring are searchable key words that resonate with evaluation. To improve your profile, incorporate these keywords repeatedly in your profile descriptions. This will allow your profile to be ranked high when the words are searched within LinkedIn. Placing keywords in your profile headline is also a great way to show your expertise and helps other users make an informed decision about connecting with you.

Hot Tip: Customize your LinkedIn URL.

When you join LinkedIn, the site creates a generic URL for your profile that includes a series of numbers. Similar to a website URL, these numbers do not resonate high in a search. Placing your name or keywords into your URL will improve the visibility of your profile. Here is a list of Instructions for how to customize your URL.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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meHi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I was recently asked how I find and choose articles to post on the AEA social media sites, so I thought I would share my resources with everyone. When posting on social media, I try to maintain a good mix of association news, to keep our community informed about AEA, and evaluation news, to keep our community informed and about trends and lessons learned in evaluation. Here is where I pull my information:

Rad Resource: Twitter

Twitter is an excellent resource for finding content. I will often search relevant hashtags such as #Eval, #Evaluation, and #DataViz to find posts relating to these topics. I do have to do a little digging to make sure I find articles and resources that are informative, reliable, and can relate back to our community – but the content I find is often very rich and diverse.

In addition to searching on twitter, I follow many evaluators who are using the platform. This is helpful, because I can then see what other evaluators are posting 1) to share their content on our sites and 2) to gain a better understanding on what content is relevant and trending in evaluation. Here’s just a few evaluators I follow:

annkemery | Ann K. Emery

clysy | Christopher Lysy

EJaneDavidson | Jane Davidson

EvaluationMaven | Kylie Hutchinson

John_Gargani | John Gargani

Rad Resource: Evaluation Blogs

I follow a lot of evaluation blogs to find insights from our members. I often share posts that I believe are relevant and will resonate with our community. These blog posts allow AEA to share multiple points of view on evaluation related topics. Below are a few blogs that I use for my “go-to” resources:

BetterEvalution

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity

Evergreen Data Blog

Ann K. Emery’s blog

Eval Central

Rad Resource: Resources from AEA

AEA has a whole page of great resources for finding evaluation content. Click here to see evaluators that are active on social media and an array of evaluation related blogs. This is a great starting point for curating content for your social media posts!

I hope this information is helpful. If you have other great evaluation resources, please share them in the comments. Get busy posting!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. As we reach the end of 2016, I wanted to provide some insights on what is predicted for social media platforms for 2017. I put together this list based on numerous industry blogs and my own insights. Let’s see what happens in 2017!

2017

Hot Tip: Quality Vs. Quantity

Platforms such as Instagram where users typically post once or twice per day are on the rise. This relates to the need for content that has more substance and is not overwhelming. Twitter is built for multiple posts, but often the posts have a short lifespan, and can clutter a news feed. Will we start to see twitter decline or change in the near future?

I also believe users will be looking for trustworthy platforms that are dedicated to showing true content. In the wake of speculation of social media spreading “fake news”, I expect Facebook and similar platforms to make this a priority in 2017.

Hot Tip: Show Users Your Event

With the popularity of Facebook Live and Snap Chat, it is no longer enough to just post about an event. You have to show the event through real-time videos and pictures. These tools make your users feel like they are a part of the action.

Hot Tip: Storytelling Will Continue to be King

Although no stranger to 2016, storytelling will be important for engagement in 2017. Similar to presenting your evaluation findings, your social media posts should go beyond recommendations or “the sell” and show the big picture and overall benefits. This is how you create online discussions and avoid the dreaded one-way conversations.

This will be my last post before 2017, so I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. I look forward to see what is in store for 2017! Add your predictions for 2017 in the comments.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Now that you are back from Evaluation 2016, how are you going to keep in touch with the connections you made in Atlanta? How about using LinkedIn? LinkedIn is a great way to follow up with your peers and colleagues form the conference.

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Hot Tip: Use LinkedIn to Build Your Professional Network

LinkedIn is the social media channel that is best for professional networking. On LinkedIn, you can search by name, company, or occupation. So, if you are not good with names you can still means to look people up! You can also search by keywords such as Evaluation or Evaluator.

Hot Tip: Build out Your LinkedIn Page so you are Easy to Find

Make your LinkedIn profile easy to find. First, make sure you have a recent photo of yourself. Next fill out your profile using searchable keywords such as evaluation, data visualization, research, internal evaluation, or health evaluation. You can also include your TIG involvement. Add the TIG you work with to the “Volunteer” section on your profile. Taking these steps will allow your profile to be easily searched by other evaluation practitioners.

Hot Tip: Follow the Evaluation 2016 Exhibitors on LinkedIn

Make connection with the exhibitors from Evaluation 2016. Like the company pages of organizations such as Abt Associates, IntegReview IRB, and Mathematica Policy Research. You can also find individuals who work at these organizations on their company page.

Hot Tip: Accept Your Digital Badge and Add it to Your Page

And one more thing…accept your digital badge from Evaluation 2016 and add it to your LinkedIn page! Use the badge to show your involvement with AEA and dedication to professional development.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Happy November everyone!  Liz Zadnik here, aea365’s Outreach Coordinator and sometimes Saturday contributor.  I’m still synthesizing everything from the conference, but I wanted to share some social media tips that I picked up and have been reading about.  

Lesson Learned:  You may know about the rule of thirds in photography and visual design, but there’s also a rule of thirds for social media.  The thirds consist of: promoting your organization or program, linking followers to allies and thought-leaders in the field, and then “fun” information that helps connect with followers and build rapport.  This model feels familiar because of our love of threes in storytelling, nature, and art.  I also find this helpful when trying to organize daily or weekly posting schedules.

Lesson Learned:  There’s also the 80/20 rule.  The ratio attempts to strike a similar balance to the rule of thirds: 80% of the time content is educational and intended to engage your audience in an interesting way – 20% is promotional, for example linking back to your website or recent publication.  It gives you a little more freedom to discover the best combination and schedule for you.     

Social media marketing and messaging research can help us shape not only the way we share our work and insights, but also in program and evaluation design.  These guides can help us organize social media components of program implementation and evaluation.  What are your favorite ways to organize social media content?   

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi there!  Liz Zadnik, aea365’s Outreach Coordinator here, with my first-timer perspective on the conference.  Fate has intervened the past few years, so I was thrilled when the stars aligned and I was able to be here.  I have learned so much and been in non-stop awe, from the opening plenary (#Breart) to the poster presentations to each session facilitator.  Writing this post was a bit of a challenge – I want to adequately convey all that’s happened.   

Rad Resources:   

  • The Evaluation 2016 app has really helped me feel a little more organized and connected to goings-on.  I loved that it was a one stop shop for social media conversations, contacts, and notes.  It kept me from fumbling with a notebook.  
  • TIG Business Meetings are phenomenal ways to connect with like-minded professionals.  I’m not a particularly outgoing or gregarious person, so more structured social events help me feel more at ease.  I also loved chatting with folks who I’ve admired from afar for years.  
  • I’m a sucker for poster presentations so I had to spend some time talking with authors and appreciating the vast array of projects and knowledge in that space.  I’m also a bit of a design enthusiast and love to hear the process of how folks decide to present their work.  

Hot Tip: Social media is your friend.  Can’t attend a session?  Check out #Eval2016 and #eval16 from time to time and see what nuggets folks share from that session (and others).  I loved reading the brilliance that was spilling out of every session and interaction throughout the conference. I definitely found some new Twitter accounts to follow!

Lesson Learned: Breathe.  I was so overwhelmed leading up to and the first day or two of the conference.  I wanted to wake up at the crack of dawn and attend every possible session.  But after a few hours, my mind was all jumbly and nothing seemed to be absorbing.  So I prioritized specific sessions, but also made time to eat, synthesize my thoughts, and brainstorm topics for future blog posts and projects.  I felt guilty at first, but then realized this time to process and reflect helped me feel energized and present throughout the day.   

Being here has been a real treat – time that has energized me and deepened my love of evaluation.  I can’t wait for what tomorrow brings.  Thanks to everyone who has made this conference possible!  My calendar is already marked for next year!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2016 officially starts tomorrow. Are you ready to learn and network with more than 3,000 evaluators? Here are some tips to help you be social at Evaluation 2016.

Hot Tip: Download the Mobile App

The new and improved Evaluation 2016 mobile app allows you to send messages and set up meeting with other attendees. To take advantage of this feature build you profile under “My Event”. The more information you add about yourself, the easier it makes it for people to find you while at the conference.  This is a great way to meet new people who are practicing evaluation and share your interests.

Hot Tip: Follow Evaluation 2016 on Twitter

We have already seen lots of chatter surrounding Evaluation 2016 on social media, particularly Twitter. Follow the hashtag #Eval16 to see conversation and posts specifically about the event. Share your conference photos and lessons learned on Twitter, so that others evaluators who were not able to attend can get a glimpse of Evaluation 2016!

Hot Tip: Attend the Social Events

Be an active participant in Evaluation 2016 events. Meet with poster presenters during the Poster Exhibit; see what literary works that are coming out this year at the Meet the Authors Reception; and learn more about the AEA TIGS during the TIG Business Meeting on Thursday night.

Hot Tip: Visit the Connection Center

Visit the Connection Center to meet with the AEA exhibitors, gain access to free Wi-Fi, and charge your electronic devices. While in the Connection Center meet with universities and learn more about technology solutions that are benefiting evaluation practices and programs.

I hope these tips have been helpful. See you in Atlanta!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

Twitter is a great tool for staying social at conferences. It provides real-time opportunities for sharing content and insights. Here are a few tips to help you be social during your upcoming conferences! You can even use these at Evaluation 2016.

Follow the Conference Hashtag

Most conferences have a hastag which allows you to follow information and news relating to the event. On Twitter, the pound sign (or hash) turns any word that directly follow it into a searchable link. This allows you to organize content and track discussion topics based on keywords. While at a conference, search for the appropriate hashtag (this will most likely be posted at the conference) to see all discussions taking place around the event. From here you can retweet, or even create your own post to stay active in the conversation. At Evaluation 2016, you can use #Eval16.

Retweet Other Users

While attending a conference, retweet posts by other attendees. Retweeting will allow you to spread content to more followers on Twitter and will give you the opportunity to be included in conversations surrounding the event.

Live Tweet a Session

Sharing insights and quotes from presentations and speakers is a great way to help evaluators who couldn’t attend the conference or decided to attend a different session. Live tweeting also helps you build relationships with the speakers. Find the speaker on twitter and add their twitter handle to your post!

Share Photos of your Experience

Photos are a great way to tell a story about your experience at the conference and allow evaluators who were not able to attend an opportunity to visualize the conference. Photos are dominant on Twitter, meaning your photos will be more likely to be retweeted by other attendees, the conference host, and speakers, expanding your exposer to a larger community.

I can’t wait to see what everyone tweets come October at Evaluation 2016! Follow AEA at @aeaweb and use #Eval16 to follow updates and news about the conference.

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Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

With so many different social media platforms to choose from (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram…) it can be hard to identify the platform that works best for your content and the people you are trying to reach with your message. I have outlined a few insights on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest that could help you determine where your content fits in on the social media spectrum.

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Hot Tip: Facebook

The most prominent age group on Facebook ranges between 25-34 years of age. This is closely followed by 35-44. Facebook requires unique content which can come in the form of photos, links, or videos. It is often difficult to re-purpose content on Facebook, because of the longevity of a post. However, the benefit to Facebook post longevity is that you do not have to post as often as other platforms, such as Twitter.  Depending on your desired activity, Facebook posts can occur a few times a week versus every day.

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Hot Tip: Twitter

Twitter and Facebook are very similar in terms of activity users. Twitter also attracts 25-34 years of age  followed closely by 35-44. The main difference with Twitter, is the life of the post. Twitter is saturated with content, which means your post might only be seen for a limited amount of time before it is pushed to the bottom of a news feed. Due to this short post lifespan, to use Twitter effectively, you need lots of content! Content should be posted to Twitter every day. This content should be a mix of original and shared (retweeted) posts.

Twitter is a great platform for re-purposing your content. Because of a Twitter post’s lifespan, you can repost the same or similar content multiple times to capture the best engagement.

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Hot Tip: LinkedIn

LinkedIn captures a similar age group as Twitter and Facebook, however the active users tend to be more professional and with some type of higher education. LinkedIn is a great place to post content that is relevant to education, career advancement, and research. The active users on LinkedIn are motivated by career goals and professional networking. Content for LinkedIn should be unique similar to Facebook.

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Hot Tip: Pinterest

Pinterest is by far dominated by women. To be successful on this platform you must have an archive of photos or visuals to choose from. Pins that are posted to Pinterest have a long shelf life, due to the active sharing and re-pinning of content. Pinterest is a great tool for sharing your data visualization examples!

I hope this blog provides a better understanding of each platform and helps you decide where to take your content. Use the comments below to share your thoughts.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. There are many reasons to start blogging: to share your work and strategies for evaluations; to become an evaluation through leader; to become a stronger writer and explain your thoughts—the reasons can be endless. I have compiled a few tips to help you create an effective blog that resonates with your followers.

Creating a Blog

Hot Tip: Content

First, identify themes, concepts, or trends that relate to your audience or other evaluators. What topics will you highlight in your blog and how will your blog stand out? For example, will your blog focus entirely on data visualization, or trends in evaluation? Once this is decided you can start working on the details.

Next, decide how often you are going to blog. Is your blog going to be a daily blog, weekly blog, or monthly blog? When making this decision, you must look at your content resources and your available time. What can you commit to, and how and from what sources are you going to gather your content?

Hot Tip: Writing

When writing a blog, you want to be aware of tone, length, and formatting. Write in a conversational tone, using personal pronouns whenever possible.  You also don’t want your blog to be too long. Typically a blog post is 1,000 words or less.  In addition, you want to break up long paragraphs or text. Try bullet points, numbered lists, or visuals to make your post more interesting.

Hot Tip: Call to Action

An important aspect of blogging is starting a conversation and obtaining your follower’s feedback. Invite your follower’s to provide their opinions or questions in the comments. This allows your post to have a longer shelf life and helps you engage with other evaluators.

I look forward to reading your blogs on evaluation! Please share your tips or questions in the comments.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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