AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I often use Facebook to connect with AEA members and the evaluation community. The platform makes it easy to share relevant articles, videos, and thoughts with your followers. I have put together a few tips to help you write more effectively for Facebook.

Hot Tip: Keep posts short

Facebook newsfeeds can often become cluttered with content. Most people tend to skim through posts quickly and won’t read long winded posts. This is why you should keep your message short and to the point. I would recommend not exceeding 200 characters.

Hot Tip: Clearly communicate your purpose

When posting on Facebook, we are often asking our followers to do something, whether it’s to look at an article or register for your event. Make sure your call to action is clear. Use key phrases like “Read this article”, “Share with your friends”, or “Use the link to register”. Sometimes your followers need that extra push.

Hot Tip: Make your links compelling

When posting a link to an article on your Facebook page, make sure the link has a compelling photo and interesting title. These are editable fields, meaning you can customize how your link appears. Sometimes links can pull titles and pictures that are not relevant to your content.

Hot Tip: Be conversational

Facebook is intended to be a fun way to interact with your friends or like-minded peers. Keep posts conversational and not overly formal. This is your opportunity to show your personality and the persona of your organization.

I look forward to seeing your posts on Facebook! Click here to like the AEA Facebook page.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I often use Twitter to communicate with AEA members and the evaluation community. It is an effective tool for sharing information and staying relevant in conversations. I have compiled a few tips that will help you compose tweets of your own!

Hot Tip: Keep tweets conversational

Twitter allows for informal conversations. Your posts should be professional, but not overly formal or business-like. This is your opportunity to show your personality or the personality of your organization.

Hot Tip: Talk with people

Twitter is a social media site, social being the key word. When composing tweets, make sure your posts are talking to people and not at people. Tag organization or people in your posts, respond to direct messages, and engage with people who are using your hashtag to stay up-to-date with conversations that are taking place online.

Hot Tip: Keep it short

You only have 140 characters to work with, so keep your message streamlined and to the point. Try to avoid fillers such as “check out”, “see what’s new”, or “Its almost here”. These phrases can add un-necessary length to your post.

Hot Tip: Tell your followers where you are taking them

When you provide a link in your post, identify what you are linking to. This can be a video, articles, or maybe a pdf document. Simply put [VIDEO] in front of your link.

I look forward to engaging with you on Twitter! Follow us @aeaweb!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

As a community manager, I create weekly posts for AEA’s Facebook and Twitter pages. Although you can share similar content on Facebook and Twitter, your approach should be unique for each channel. I have put together a few tips for composing text for both Facebook and Twitter.

Facebook:

Hot Tip: Keep it to 80 characters

The Facebook character limit is technically 63,206; however, when posting on Facebook, you should try to keep your text within 80 characters. Long text or stories should be shared on your blog and are not right for this Facebook.

Hot Tip: Don’t just post a link

Facebook is a great channel for sharing blog posts or linking to external content, but don’t just post the link. Be sure to add context to your post to grab the attention of your followers.

Hot Tip: Use images

Facebook posts that use images receive more engagement than posts without images. To bring more diversity to your page, allow your image to do the talking by adding supporting text. This can help reduce the amount of characters you use in your posts.

Twitter:

Hot Tip: Keep it simple

Twitter has a character limit of 140, but studies have shown that posts that are 120-130 in length receive better engagement. Source

Hot Tip: Grammar is still important

With a limited character allotment, many people want to shorten their postings by using acronyms, shortened words, or incorrect grammar. These tricks can make your post hard to read and understand.

Hot Tip: Don’t go crazy with hashtags

Hashtags are a great way to categorize your twitter posts and make them searchable for twitter users. However, you only want to use 1-2 hashtags in a single post. To many can be distracting and a waste of space, you are better off filling your post with additional content.

Good luck crafting your posts!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Posting on multiple social media sites requires good imagery, and on a low budget this can be tough. Images make your content eye-catching and can even add context to a post. On all channels, posting with images out preforms those without images. Canva is an easy and free way to create your own graphics, charts, infographics, and images. Today, I will show you how to create an image using free Canva formats, layouts, and photos.

Rad Resource: Choose your format

Each social media channel has a preferred image size. This size will allow your photos to be clearly viewed in a newsfeed. Canva takes the guess work out, and helps you create images specifically for each channel. They have an array of sizes you can choose from. You can even create a custom design by entering your own dimensions. For this example, we will be choosing the Facebook post format.

Rad Resource: Find a Layout

Canva offer many free layout that you can edit with your own content. Simply click on the layout you like and it will be added to your canvas.

Rad Resource: Edit your image

Once you have selected your desired layout, you can now add photos and text to your image. If you have a photo you would like to use, simply upload it to Canva under “uploads”. If you don’t have a photo, you’re in luck. Canva offers high quality stock photos for free. Browse the collection and find the one that works for your graphic. Once you find the photo, drag it onto the canvas.

Next, click on the text of your image and update the content. You can also change the color of text and backgrounds as you desire.

Once you are happy with your creation, download your image by selecting the “download” button in the right corner. Now you can post it to Facebook and promote your webinar!

I look forward to seeing lots of designs in my newsfeed!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for the AEA. LinkedIn stands out as the social platform for professional development and industry sharing. It is a great resource for presenting yourself as an experienced evaluator as well as finding resources and networking opportunities that will benefit your practice and strategies. I have compiled a few tips that will help you create a stronger personal profile, and identified LinkedIn resources.

Hot Tip: Enhance your Profile

Go beyond just including a photo, work experience, and education – really enhance your profile by including your publications, skills, awards, independent course work, volunteer experience, or organizations you belong to. All of these features allow you to have a robust, well-rounded profile and will highlight your expertise as an evaluator.

Hot Tip: Use key words

Create a list of keywords that accurately communicate your expertise. For example, evaluation, visual data, statistics, research, and monitoring are searchable key words that resonate with evaluation. To improve your profile, incorporate these keywords repeatedly in your profile descriptions. This will allow your profile to be ranked high when the words are searched within LinkedIn. Placing keywords in your profile headline is also a great way to show your expertise and helps other users make an informed decision about connecting with you.

Hot Tip: Customize your LinkedIn URL.

When you join LinkedIn, the site creates a generic URL for your profile that includes a series of numbers. Similar to a website URL, these numbers do not resonate high in a search. Placing your name or keywords into your URL will improve the visibility of your profile. Here is a list of Instructions for how to customize your URL.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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meHi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I was recently asked how I find and choose articles to post on the AEA social media sites, so I thought I would share my resources with everyone. When posting on social media, I try to maintain a good mix of association news, to keep our community informed about AEA, and evaluation news, to keep our community informed and about trends and lessons learned in evaluation. Here is where I pull my information:

Rad Resource: Twitter

Twitter is an excellent resource for finding content. I will often search relevant hashtags such as #Eval, #Evaluation, and #DataViz to find posts relating to these topics. I do have to do a little digging to make sure I find articles and resources that are informative, reliable, and can relate back to our community – but the content I find is often very rich and diverse.

In addition to searching on twitter, I follow many evaluators who are using the platform. This is helpful, because I can then see what other evaluators are posting 1) to share their content on our sites and 2) to gain a better understanding on what content is relevant and trending in evaluation. Here’s just a few evaluators I follow:

annkemery | Ann K. Emery

clysy | Christopher Lysy

EJaneDavidson | Jane Davidson

EvaluationMaven | Kylie Hutchinson

John_Gargani | John Gargani

Rad Resource: Evaluation Blogs

I follow a lot of evaluation blogs to find insights from our members. I often share posts that I believe are relevant and will resonate with our community. These blog posts allow AEA to share multiple points of view on evaluation related topics. Below are a few blogs that I use for my “go-to” resources:

BetterEvalution

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity

Evergreen Data Blog

Ann K. Emery’s blog

Eval Central

Rad Resource: Resources from AEA

AEA has a whole page of great resources for finding evaluation content. Click here to see evaluators that are active on social media and an array of evaluation related blogs. This is a great starting point for curating content for your social media posts!

I hope this information is helpful. If you have other great evaluation resources, please share them in the comments. Get busy posting!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. As we reach the end of 2016, I wanted to provide some insights on what is predicted for social media platforms for 2017. I put together this list based on numerous industry blogs and my own insights. Let’s see what happens in 2017!

2017

Hot Tip: Quality Vs. Quantity

Platforms such as Instagram where users typically post once or twice per day are on the rise. This relates to the need for content that has more substance and is not overwhelming. Twitter is built for multiple posts, but often the posts have a short lifespan, and can clutter a news feed. Will we start to see twitter decline or change in the near future?

I also believe users will be looking for trustworthy platforms that are dedicated to showing true content. In the wake of speculation of social media spreading “fake news”, I expect Facebook and similar platforms to make this a priority in 2017.

Hot Tip: Show Users Your Event

With the popularity of Facebook Live and Snap Chat, it is no longer enough to just post about an event. You have to show the event through real-time videos and pictures. These tools make your users feel like they are a part of the action.

Hot Tip: Storytelling Will Continue to be King

Although no stranger to 2016, storytelling will be important for engagement in 2017. Similar to presenting your evaluation findings, your social media posts should go beyond recommendations or “the sell” and show the big picture and overall benefits. This is how you create online discussions and avoid the dreaded one-way conversations.

This will be my last post before 2017, so I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. I look forward to see what is in store for 2017! Add your predictions for 2017 in the comments.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Now that you are back from Evaluation 2016, how are you going to keep in touch with the connections you made in Atlanta? How about using LinkedIn? LinkedIn is a great way to follow up with your peers and colleagues form the conference.

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Hot Tip: Use LinkedIn to Build Your Professional Network

LinkedIn is the social media channel that is best for professional networking. On LinkedIn, you can search by name, company, or occupation. So, if you are not good with names you can still means to look people up! You can also search by keywords such as Evaluation or Evaluator.

Hot Tip: Build out Your LinkedIn Page so you are Easy to Find

Make your LinkedIn profile easy to find. First, make sure you have a recent photo of yourself. Next fill out your profile using searchable keywords such as evaluation, data visualization, research, internal evaluation, or health evaluation. You can also include your TIG involvement. Add the TIG you work with to the “Volunteer” section on your profile. Taking these steps will allow your profile to be easily searched by other evaluation practitioners.

Hot Tip: Follow the Evaluation 2016 Exhibitors on LinkedIn

Make connection with the exhibitors from Evaluation 2016. Like the company pages of organizations such as Abt Associates, IntegReview IRB, and Mathematica Policy Research. You can also find individuals who work at these organizations on their company page.

Hot Tip: Accept Your Digital Badge and Add it to Your Page

And one more thing…accept your digital badge from Evaluation 2016 and add it to your LinkedIn page! Use the badge to show your involvement with AEA and dedication to professional development.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Happy November everyone!  Liz Zadnik here, aea365’s Outreach Coordinator and sometimes Saturday contributor.  I’m still synthesizing everything from the conference, but I wanted to share some social media tips that I picked up and have been reading about.  

Lesson Learned:  You may know about the rule of thirds in photography and visual design, but there’s also a rule of thirds for social media.  The thirds consist of: promoting your organization or program, linking followers to allies and thought-leaders in the field, and then “fun” information that helps connect with followers and build rapport.  This model feels familiar because of our love of threes in storytelling, nature, and art.  I also find this helpful when trying to organize daily or weekly posting schedules.

Lesson Learned:  There’s also the 80/20 rule.  The ratio attempts to strike a similar balance to the rule of thirds: 80% of the time content is educational and intended to engage your audience in an interesting way – 20% is promotional, for example linking back to your website or recent publication.  It gives you a little more freedom to discover the best combination and schedule for you.     

Social media marketing and messaging research can help us shape not only the way we share our work and insights, but also in program and evaluation design.  These guides can help us organize social media components of program implementation and evaluation.  What are your favorite ways to organize social media content?   

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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