AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

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Greetings! We are Della Thomas and Marcia Kolvitz. Della works with local school districts to providing language access services to students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Marcia is an educational consultant who focuses on professional development in the areas of transition planning and postsecondary opportunities for students and youth who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Both of us have worked with a large-scale initiative to support collaborative activities that engage stakeholders from across the United States to address issues in deaf education. Our participants represented a variety of stakeholder groups, and many of them were D/HH. We’ve considered ways to ensure that our diverse group of participants have the opportunity to participate in these collaborative activities equally. Additionally, as travel funds become scarce and stakeholders’ schedules become busier, we’ve supplemented face-to-face meetings with technology use as a means of building community and supporting team activities.

Lessons Learned:

  • Open captions during presentations benefit everyone. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) services are considered an accommodation for participants who are D/HH. However, background noise can make it difficult for other participants to hear the speaker, and some participants may find their attention wandering. The use of CART captions is a good example of Universal Design during a conference.
  • Telephone communication doesn’t always work. Participants who are D/HH may request sign language interpreters during teleconferences to facilitate communication among team members. A simple way to provide this is by using videoconferencing for all participants. Not only does this include the D/HH member, but the non-verbal cues such as facial expressions or body language can provide all participants with additional information.
  • Use a professional for important event (aka evaluation). The standard for a CART provider using a steno keyboard is a minimum of 180 words per minute (wpm) and an accuracy rate of 96%.

Although these lessons learned came as the result of planning large-scale interagency collaborative activities, their value extends beyond individuals with hearing loss. Enhancing large group presentations via CART and small group meetings via videoconferencing will not only provide greater linguistic access for participants, but will send a message of inclusivity for all.

Rad Resources:

RIT Job Board

RIT Job Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Want to add captions yourself?  Try MAGPie free software for adding captions and video descriptions to QuickTime, Windows Media, Real and Flash multimedia.
MAGpie2

Media Access Generator – MAGpie2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The American Evaluation Association is hosting the Disabilities and Underrepresented Populations TIG (DUP) Week. The contributions all week are focused on engaging DUP in your evaluation efforts. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hey everyone! I’m Echo Rivera, owner of Creative Research Communications and research associate at Center for Policy Research. My passion is helping evaluators bring creativity to the research communication process. Today I want to talk about your presentation design workflow.

Let me ask you something: does the process of making a presentation stress you out? Do you find you’re always scrambling last minute to finish a presentation on time?

Yeah, I’ve been there. When we have to make several presentations throughout the year, they can add up to a lot of wasted time when done inefficiently.

One part of your workflow might be the biggest problem: Adding visuals.

Does your workflow look something like this?

  1. You’re working on your presentation,
  2. You look at your slide and think “is there an image for that?”,
  3. You search and search and search online until you find the right one,
  4. Then you add it to your presentation, aaaand
  5. Repeat

Am I close? Or did I miss the step where you get lost in the rabbit hole of news articles, blogs or YouTube?

This simple act of looking for one image at a time is extremely inefficient. When you’re in SPSS crunching numbers, do you suddenly stop and start searching for articles for your lit review, then come back later to finish and print your output?

That would be super inefficient, right? The same idea applies to presentations.

Hot Tip:

You will be most efficient if you approach each presentation activity as a separate, standalone task.

SUGGESTED STEPS TO AN EFFICIENT PRESENTATION DESIGN WORKFLOW:

[1] Set Presentation Goals & Figure Out Your Story

  1.  Think through who the audience is and what will resonate with them the most.
  2. Decide on 1-3 key point(s) to make in the presentation.
  3. Brainstorm a “storyboard” that funnels into the key point(s)

[2] Draft Your Presenter Notes

  1. Following your storyboard, draft what you want to say on the slides
  2. Do a quick run-through, speaking aloud all of the notes, making adjustments to the order/organization, filling in any gaps, and removing “fluff.”
  3. Do another run-through to assess time. Add/remove content as necessary. Try to finalize content as much as possible.

[3] Design the Slides

  1. Copy & paste text from your slides into the presenter notes, adding back in only a few words onto the slide, and no more than 3 points per slide.
  2. Add high quality visuals on as many slides as possible, reducing excess text as you go along.
  3. Use design elements to make the remaining text effective (e.g., minimum font size 30).
  4. If necessary, add simple animations (e.g., appear)  to walk the audience through the content.
  5. Conduct a self-check on the overall presentation to ensure all content is readable & visually appealing.

Rad Resource: Step 3b should not take very long. The trick is to have a Visual Database ready to go. I created a free 6-day email course that shows you how to create one. Check it out!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

This is Jean King, professor of Evaluation Studies at the University of Minnesota and mother of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI—pronounced “messy” because evaluation is that way). MESI began 20 years ago to provide high quality evaluation training to all comers: evaluation practitioners, students, accidental evaluators, and program staff and administrators. We are fortunate to have had Minnesotans Michael Quinn Patton and Dick Krueger as regular MESI trainers from the beginning and, with funding from Professor Emerita Mary Corcoran, guest sessions from many of our field’s luminaries. Over the years MESI has taught me a great deal. This entry details three learnings.

Lesson Learned: Structured reflection is helpful during evaluation training. Experiential educators remind us that merely having an experience does not necessarily lead to change; reflection is the key to taking that experience and learning from it. At MESI plenaries we regularly build in time when the speaker finishes for people to “turn to a neighbor” (groups of 2 to 4–no larger) and talk about what they took as the main ideas and any confusions/questions they have. The reflection is easy to structure, and people engage actively. If appropriate, the facilitator can ask people to jot down their questions, which can become the basis of Q&A.

Hot Tip: I never ask an entire large group, “Are there any questions?” At the end of sessions in large conferences/training sessions, the facilitator/presenter will frequently ask the entire group if there are any questions. In these situations there is often an awkward pause, sometimes lasting long enough that people start glancing nervously at each other or at the door, and then someone who can’t stand the silence thinks of a question, raises a hand, and is instantly called on. Everyone breathes a sigh of relief. When I facilitate a session, I instead use the “turn to a neighbor” strategy (briefly—just a couple of minutes) so that everyone can start talking and generate potential questions. You can even call on people and ask what they were discussing in their small group.

Cool Trick: Create Top Ten lists as part of a meeting or training session. Since MESI’s inception, attendees have participated in an annual tongue-in-cheek Top Ten competition where they submit creative answers to a simile that describes how evaluation is like something else (e.g., the state fair, baseball, Obamacare). We provide prizes for the top three responses, and I am continually impressed with people’s cleverness. This year’s topic compared evaluation to interstellar space travel, and the final list is posted at www.evaluation.umn.edu. The Top Ten is a useful activity because it spurs creativity and helps a group come together around a common, low-key cause.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating MESI Spring Training Week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from evaluators who presented at or attended the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute Spring Training. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor. Evaluation is my newer career. I’m actually an educator, having taught in K12 schools and at a university. I’m also a professional developer, having provided PD courses, workshops, coaching, and mentoring to educators and evaluators for more than 15 years, so I’m no stranger to presentation design.

Lessons Learned: Check out p2i tools before designing any presentation! I’ve learned so much from AEA’s Potent Presentations Initiative (p2i) – AEA’s effort to help members improve their presentation skills, particularly around delivering conference presentations with specific advice about how to make your presentations more potent by focusing on three things: message, design, and delivery – and have incorporated these principles and strategies into my work.  

Rad Resource: Coming soon! The new p2i Audience Engagement Workbook. I’m honored to be able to share my experience in designing and facilitating presentations and professional learning opportunities as we add to the family of p2i tools with the Audience Engagement Workbook, featuring the WHY, WHAT and HOW of audience engagement, along with 20 specific strategies any presenter can use with limited investment of time or money.

Each strategy is described and rated on a number of dimensions such as ease of application, materials needed, cost, and the degree of movement for participants. There’s even a special section on engaging audiences in a webinar environment!

Hot Tip: One strategy to try now!

Four Corners: Choose just about any topic or question that has 3 or 4 positions or answers (e.g. In your family are you a first born, only child, oldest child, or in the middle? In your evaluation work, do you mainly use qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods? Do you consider yourself a novice, experienced, or expert evaluator?) and ask participants to walk to the corner of the room that you specify. Once there, give them an opportunity (3-5 minutes) to discuss this commonality, then return to their seats. If time permits, call on volunteers to share some insights from their brief discussion.

Variation: Ask participants a question that requires them to take sides (usually two sides, but could be three or more). Ask them to walk to the side of the room assigned to that position, and discuss with others who share their views. You can ask them to form two lines facing each other and have a debate with participants from each side presenting support for their position.

Stephanie Evergreen, information designer, dataviz diva, and p2i lead is putting the finishing touches on the layout and design of the workbook and we’ll have it up and ready for you well ahead of Evaluation 2014! In the meantime, look for Stephanie to preview additional strategies in the next AEA Newsletter!

Do you want your audience doing this? (Image credit: zenobia_joy via Flickr

Do you want your audience doing this? (Image credit: zenobia_joy via Flickr)

 

Or this? (Image credit: Chris  Hacking via Flickr)

Or this? (Image credit: Chris Hacking via Flickr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello! It’s Sheila B Robinson, aea365 Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with a fabulous and  free sign tool for polishing your presentations!

Great presentations are complemented by great visuals. Using icons on your slides are one way to organize information visually, and direct your audience’s attention to the topic at hand.

There is no shortage of help out there for downloading and even creating your own icons for use in presentations. Want some ideas? Check out Stephanie Evergreen’s blog. Just type “icon” in the search box there and you’ll have the opportunity to read several posts about using and creating icons. In fact, it was Stephanie who turned me on to iconfinder.com, my new favorite free tool!

chalkboard

Lesson Learned: I recently had to create a presentation reporting evaluation results from several data collection points. There was a telephone interview, an online survey, and a paper survey. As I created my presentation, I added icons to each slide – a phone icon, a computer icon, and a paper icon. Using these ensured limited text on each slide, as they eliminated the need for “Phone interview” or “Online survey” to appear on each.

tools

Rad Resource: Try iconfinder.com for all your icon needs! While there is an excellent selection of free icons, they also have a huge selection of low-cost high quality icons. I found prices ranging from $0.48 to $1.98. You can filter your search by price and by license. You can also search specifically for vector graphics, a favorite among graphic artists and presentation creators for their inherent flexibility.
toolsRad Resources:  Presentation-Process.com has a great tutorial on creating your own icons in PowerPoint, and Haute Slides features a tutorial  on creating custom icons from clip art.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is John Nash, and I am an associate professor at Iowa State University in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies with a joint appointment in Human Computer Interaction. I’m also a program strategist, evaluator, and design geek.

2014 Update:  I am now an associate professor at the University of Kentucky in the Department of Educational Leadership Studies and director of  the dLab (http://dLab.uky.edu).

Today I’d like to share ways to improve slide presentations.

Hot Tip: Know Your Audience – This is an oft overlooked tip from Nancy Duarte, author of slide:ology, a wonderful book on the art and science of creating great presentations. Duarte suggests seven questions to ask before developing any presentation:

  1. What are they like?
  2. Why are they here?
  3. What keeps them up at night?
  4. How can you solve their problem?
  5. What do you want them to do?
  6. How can you best reach them?
  7. How might they resist?

It’s easy to see how these questions would be important to answer in a business or sales presentation. However, amongst evaluators, they are often overlooked when designing a client briefing or conference presentation. I’m especially drawn to question 5, which reminds me that every presentation should be a call to action.

Hot Tip: Let Go of Text – Text can be a crutch for the time-pressed and insecure presenter. Duarte suggests three strategies to excising text as a crutch on your slides:

REDUCE: Practice presenting your slides a few times, then highlight one keyword per bullet point. Deliver your slides from only the keywords, using the rest as notes. Eventually, consider replacing the keyword with an image.

RECORD: Read your presentation out loud and record the audio. Play it back. Once you get over the horror of hearing your own voice, you’ll be able to concentrate on your content and not focus on the slides.

REPEAT: Practice, make note cards, draw a mind map, do anything that helps you visualize or create a cheat sheet. Then, look at your slides and delete as much as possible that’s covered already on your cheat sheet.

Rad Resources: If I could recommend only two books on presenting, they would be the aforementioned slide:ology and Gary Reynold’s Presentation Zen.

Hot Tip: Ignite! Ignite-style presentations are exactly five minutes long using 20 slides that auto-advance every 15 seconds. Using Ignite means delivering the most salient content, from a point of passion, while remaining story-focused (and thus, I argue, more audience focused). For example, watch Molly Wright Steenson’s presentation on the otherwise arcane topic of pneumatic tube networks. Did you adsorb more information than in any other five minutes of your day? Notice how she uses minimal text, good images, and a great story to grab your attention.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365 week. The contributions all this week are reposts of great aea365 blogs from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is James Coyle and I am the Director of Performance and Evaluation at the Interior Health Authority; I’m also involved in the Evaluation Mentoring Canada initiative and an active evaluation podcaster. Even though the AEA annual conference is right around the corner, I want to tell you how I’ve used AEA resources outside of my conference sessions.

I’ve always tried my best to avoid the most common pitfalls associated with ‘death by PowerPoint’ (DBP). However, ever since an interview with Stephanie Evergreen for a podcast about p2i I’ve been even more concerned with the quality of presentations I’m delivering in my own organization. After reviewing the p2i resources I couldn’t ignore the fact that there was there was still plenty of room to improve my presentations. The good news was that all of the resources I needed to help me were in one place.

Rad Resources: AEA’s p2i website and tools are great yet I tend to focus on 3 resources for non-AEA presentations in my organization.

  • The 2-page Presentation Assessment Rubric is a great checklist that helps people give you feedback on your presentation and generates scores on 3 key elements of your presentation: 1. Message, 2. Design and 3. Delivery. Try using it during practice sessions of your presentation.
  • The Messaging Model Handout is critical in helping me structure my presentation and figure out how much time to spend on each part of a presentation. If I’ve only got 15 minutes to present to busy Senior Executives I really need to plan out the structure and timing of my presentation ahead of time.

Coyle

  • Lastly, the Slide Design Guidelines are an indispensible checklist to ensure your slides’ graphics, fonts, color, and other elements support your audience’s learning.

Hot Tip: Share these resources with your non-evaluation colleagues in your own organizations.

I share the p2i resources with my health care colleagues whenever possible because the principles behind giving great presentations apply to their roles too.

Lesson Learned: If you are giving a webinar test your slides on the software platform ahead of time.

After spending hours (days?!) of hard work creating a presentation recently I was very sad to learn that the high quality graphics we used for our slides were distorted on the audience side of the webinar (even though the slides looked fine on my local screen). I didn’t test the presentation on the platform ahead of time; that won’t happen again!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings from beautiful Boise, Idaho! We are Bryon Welch (principal evaluator) and Rakesh Mohan (director) at the Idaho Legislature’s Office of Performance Evaluations.

Working for a state legislature, we are always trying to come up with different ideas on how to effectively present our analysis. Because our reports are used by policymakers whose attention is constantly in demand by many competing interests, we wanted to ensure that we communicate our evaluation report’s message clearly, concisely, and convincingly. Presenting data in new, interactive ways helps us literally put the data behind our analysis with a click.

Rad Resource: A couple of years ago we were introduced to Tableau, a data visualization software that allows interactive, immersive visualization of data. Both paid and free versions of the software are available. Perhaps the most useful function of the Tableau software is its ability to publish data visualization to the web.

Hot Tip: Begin by looking through the Tableau public gallery for ideas on how you might present your data. The gallery has dozens of data visualization examples including government and public data and health and science data.

Hot Tip: Tableau offers training and tutorials to assist you in learning different ways in which data can be presented.

Hot Tip: Before publishing any data through Tableau, read their Public Data Policy. Of particular note are these words from the policy, “You should not publish confidential data that you want to keep private… Once it is posted you should expect that data to be no longer private.”

Cool Trick: Beginners can start with a summary of data that they have already completed and then, using Tableau Public, they can transform that data into something interactive and visually appealing. For example, our office recently published a report on state employee compensation and turnover that included an appendix on agency turnover. We took that same data and turned it into an interactive chart that we published on our website for policymakers and members of the public.

Presentations that tell a story: Bringing an interactive element into a presentation can help you summarize a long, complex report for your audience. When it came time to present our report on employee compensation to various legislative committees, we put our data into Tableau Public. Tableau transformed the data into an interactive chart that showed policymakers and the public how to customize the visual representation of the data we presented—something that our appendix could not do. By including the data visualizations in our presentations, we were able to quickly summarize some of the main conclusions of the report. We believe the interactive data provided policymakers with the information they desired in a more meaningful format.

Clipped from http://www.tableausoftware.com/products/public

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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My name is Susan Kistler and I am the Executive Director Emeritus of the American Evaluation Association. I am a student of the act of presenting, always on the lookout for ways to improve.

Rad Resource – Haiku Deck: I have been trying out Haiku Deck, an alternative to PowerPoint for creating presentation slide decks. I had read about it in this blog post from Stephanie Evergreen, and Karen Anderson (blogger at On Top of the Box Evaluation), prompted me to give it a try. What a wonderful surprise!

Lessons Learned – Haiku Deck Capabilities: Haiku Deck allows the creation of two basic types of slides:

  • Type I – Photo-based Slides: These slides consist of a full-bleed photo and limited text. You have five ‘themes’ from which to choose that change primarily the font, as well as multiple options for text placement. Here are three examples from an upcoming presentation on survey question development at the AEA Summer Institute.

    photos

Created with Haiku Deck, the free presentation app for iPad

  • Type II – Graph-based Slides: These slides take one of three forms – number callouts, donut graphs, and bar charts. I made an example of each of the three below.graphs

Created with Haiku Deck, the free presentation app for iPad

Lessons Learned – the Pros of Haiku Deck:

  • Outstanding photo search, selection, and recognition: The process of selecting Creative Commons licensed photos from Flickr was easy and fun, and the selections it recommended were excellent without having to wade through hundreds of pictures. Thinking on how much time I have spent finding and cropping pictures, I wish that PowerPoint had this functionality.
  • Good design principles for photo-based slides: The photo-based slides look sleek, clean, and modern. They follow the designe guidelines suggested by AEA’s Potent Presentations Initiative. The pictures are high quality and full-bleed – going all the way to the edges of the slides. Text is kept to a minimum. Only two fonts are used and they are complimentary. Things are well-aligned.
  • Extremely easy to use: I made a demo deck in the car!
  • Free

Lessons Learned – the Cons of Haiku Deck:

  • iPad Based: No iPad? No making Haiku Decks, although anyone can view the final decks on the Haiku Deck website.
  • Requires Saving to the Web: Thus, you have to have an internet connection and potentially some patience as saving decks full of gorgeous pictures can take time.
  • Graph-based Slides are Limited and Less Well Designed: The graph-based slides come in only three flavors and, like the photo-based ones, have very limited editing capabilities, which for me created more of a problem with the graphs than the photos.  Quality design principles are adhered to less closely here, with often too-small fonts and the questionable use of the donut chart.

I will do a follow-up post delving deeper into Haiku Deck in a subsequent week.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, we are Greg Lestikow, CEO and Fatima Frank, Project Manager of evalû, a small consulting firm that focuses exclusively on rigorous evaluations of social and economic development initiatives.  We champion impact evaluation that maintains academic rigor but is based entirely on our clients’ need to improve strategic and operational effectiveness and increase profitability.

We spend much of our time in the field, yet we often find that we have less time on the ground than we’d like. We have a lot to do and a lot of information to transfer to our clients’ field teams. Just as importantly, we are trying to build local buy-in to ensure a successful evaluation once we leave the country.  As such, we have developed and refined three basic workshops to involve key local staff early on in the evaluation process.

Hot Tips:

  • In the first week, cover the basics of evaluation. Given the diversity of field staff and skill sets evaluators work with, it’s important to lay out the basic groundwork of M&E so that everyone is on the same page when it comes to the purpose of the evaluation. Our first presentation, titled “Measuring Impact,” covers:
  • Distinguishing between monitoring and evaluation
  • Discussing the importance of rigorous evaluation and the project evaluation process
  • Introducing methodologies for rigorous evaluation techniques
  • Drawing links between program design and program evaluation
  • Understanding how we measure change at the individual and community level
  • Second, (generally during the same week), give an in-depth presentation on evaluation indicators. This would be an ideal time to present an Indicator Framework if you have one (see our three-part series on our evalû-created indicators system) or give a general presentation on indicators (what makes a good indicator, SMART indicators, etc).  This presentation should provide practical training with participatory activities to engage the field teams and ensure that they understand the nuances and organization of indicators and requirements. This training helps M&E and program staff think about their projects and what indicators they want to use for the evaluation.
  • The last presentation should occur in the week or two before start of data collection. This presentation consists of specific training for survey enumerators and qualitative data collection workers.  We combine the training for surveys and qualitative data collection so that workers in both areas understand how the instruments support one another.  We’ve also found that this cross-training allows data collectors to take on different responsibilities if needed.  You never know when one of your enumerators will call in sick!

If you have other helpful evaluation training resources, please feel free to post them here or contact us directly.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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