AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

With so many different social media platforms to choose from (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram…) it can be hard to identify the platform that works best for your content and the people you are trying to reach with your message. I have outlined a few insights on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest that could help you determine where your content fits in on the social media spectrum.

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Hot Tip: Facebook

The most prominent age group on Facebook ranges between 25-34 years of age. This is closely followed by 35-44. Facebook requires unique content which can come in the form of photos, links, or videos. It is often difficult to re-purpose content on Facebook, because of the longevity of a post. However, the benefit to Facebook post longevity is that you do not have to post as often as other platforms, such as Twitter.  Depending on your desired activity, Facebook posts can occur a few times a week versus every day.

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Hot Tip: Twitter

Twitter and Facebook are very similar in terms of activity users. Twitter also attracts 25-34 years of age  followed closely by 35-44. The main difference with Twitter, is the life of the post. Twitter is saturated with content, which means your post might only be seen for a limited amount of time before it is pushed to the bottom of a news feed. Due to this short post lifespan, to use Twitter effectively, you need lots of content! Content should be posted to Twitter every day. This content should be a mix of original and shared (retweeted) posts.

Twitter is a great platform for re-purposing your content. Because of a Twitter post’s lifespan, you can repost the same or similar content multiple times to capture the best engagement.

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Hot Tip: LinkedIn

LinkedIn captures a similar age group as Twitter and Facebook, however the active users tend to be more professional and with some type of higher education. LinkedIn is a great place to post content that is relevant to education, career advancement, and research. The active users on LinkedIn are motivated by career goals and professional networking. Content for LinkedIn should be unique similar to Facebook.

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Hot Tip: Pinterest

Pinterest is by far dominated by women. To be successful on this platform you must have an archive of photos or visuals to choose from. Pins that are posted to Pinterest have a long shelf life, due to the active sharing and re-pinning of content. Pinterest is a great tool for sharing your data visualization examples!

I hope this blog provides a better understanding of each platform and helps you decide where to take your content. Use the comments below to share your thoughts.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso.  I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association (AEA).

Pinterest is a wonderful tool for creating shopping lists and finding great DYI projects, but did you also know that it is a useful resource for finding interesting data visuals and info graphics? After all, Pinterest is a place to go to be inspired and to share ideas with others. In my initial post about Pinterest, I have listed some steps for starting your journey on the tool and finding ways to use Pinterest for motivation.

Rad Resources: How it Works

When you create a Pinterest profile, you have the ability to create boards that relate to your particular interests. Boards allow you to keep all of your related pins together and help you stay organized by subject matter. I’ve used my Pinterest profile below as an example:

pinterest baord

Use the search bar at the top to search keywords focused on your interests. I suggest searching for data visualization, presentations, research, and evaluation. These keywords will pull images, info graphics, research examples, presentation tips, and much more, which have been pinned on Pinterest by other users.

When you find an image you like, pin it to a board!  After you select pin, the site will prompt you to choose a board or create a new board. Now all of your related pins are in one place that you can easily reference.

pin exampkle     pin exampkle.png2

Rad Resource: Follow others on Pinterest

Similar to other social media sites, you can look people up by their names and follow them. When you follow someone, you get notified when they add items to their boards and their activity is shown in your news stream. Some of your favorite evaluators are already pinning on Pinterest including Kylie Hutchinson, Ann Emery, Stephanie Evergreen, and Chris Lysy.

You can also follow boards. If you come across a Pinterest board created by a user that you find particularly fascinating, you can follow that board and you will be notified when something gets added.

follow board

Rad Resource: Be Inspired

The greatest aspect of Pinterest is that you can be inspired by the work of others and keep a keen eye on trends within evaluations, research, and presentation. Pinterest encourages you to think creatively and find the best format for your evaluation or data.

AEA is interested in joining Pinterest. Tell us in the comments if this is something you would enjoy and find as a useful resource for your evaluations and projects!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings from Canada! My name is Chi Yan Lam (@chiyanlam) and I am a PhD student working in the areas of educational assessment and program evaluation at Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario. You are probably already familiar with legitimate uses of Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook in relation to evaluation learning, but have you thought about augmenting your personal learning network to other social media platforms?

In today’s connected learning environments, professional development is no longer confined to traditional codified sources of knowledge, such as peer-reviewed journals or conference workshops. Social media can inform your professional development by facilitating communications with those within and outside of your immediate network, connecting you to those evaluators who share your interests, and allowing you to create and share your learning with others. Augmenting your personal learning network with online resources can be tremendously valuable and rewarding.

Rad Resource: YouTube needs no introduction and, boy, is it a hidden treasure trove of evaluation resources. From short instructional clips to recorded lecture and talks, you can easily locate many hours of learning. Try searching for specific key word (e.g. Empowerment Evaluation; Developmental Evaluation), or for specific theorist (e.g. Michael Patton). You should also search for YouTube Channels organized by evaluation organizations (e.g. AEA; IPDET).

Rad Resource: Pinterest is the virtual equivalent to a corkboard allowing its users to ‘pin’ and collect great visuals from all over the web. Evaluators like Kylie Hutchison and others do a fabulous job of curating great, often visually interesting, resources on evaluation.

Rad Resource: Slideshare is a great repository of presentation slidedecks. Try searching for slidedecks from specific conferences (e.g. eval13) or by evaluation approaches (e.g. developmental evaluation).

Rad Resource: Attend live online PD webinars. AEA offers both their e-Study and Coffee Break series. Did you know AEA members have free access to previously recorded Coffee Break webinars! The Canadian Evaluation Society is also launching a webinar series.

One more thing…

Bonus Rad Resource: Institutions often make available lectures and debates online! For instance, take a look at the 2010 Claremont Evaluation Debate, Claremont Evaluation Center Webinar Series, or Western Michigan University’s Evaluation Café series.

Happy learning!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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