AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | MSI

Hello!  My name is Imelda K Moise, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Geography and Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami, Florida. Prior to this, I was a GIS /Global Health M&E Advisor, a Research Specialist and spent six years as a Peace Corps technical trainer in Zambia. Because of these experiences, much of my work has primarily focused on utilizing multi-method approaches, community-based participatory research (CBPR) and evidence-informed interventions that are culturally responsive to a specific problem identified for a given context and practice (e.g., in the areas of diffusion and distribution of disease, health care/utilization and geographical targeting). As a 2016-17 MSI Fellow, our cohort examined the Intersection between Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE).

My contribution to the group project focused on how geographic thinking can help us understand a wide range of SDOH and identification of at-risk groups in affected communities to provide tailored interventions and services to the right people, in the right places and in a timely manner. The following example from one of my projects highlights how I have applied geographical thinking to support neighborhood scale interventions.

Lessons Learned: How would you go about identifying the most at-risk populations and neighborhoods to provide tailored interventions and services in a timely manner? This was the issue in post-Katrina New Orleans.  What we found was that although the hurricane itself was a huge trauma, for those who lived in the affected areas, the mental strain did not stop after floodwaters receded. To help identify at-risk areas and populations in need, we examined hospital data from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals in New Orleans from 2004 (pre-Katrina) and 2008 (post-Katrina), looking for a change in the rate of hospitalizations for substance abuse. “What we saw was that geographic patterns of hospitalization for substance abuse disorders shifted in post-Katrina from flood-exposed areas to less exposed areas located in the center of the city, areas used for evacuees displaced by the hurricane.”

The generated information can inform public health officials deploy targeted interventions and treatment for substance use disorders to those affected individuals and neighborhoods in a timely manner. Further, physicians and other health care providers can use these findings as evidence to attend to the patient’s state of mind after such trauma.

As evaluators, we can contribute to research on CRE by teasing out connections between place effects and health disparities by utilizing geographic tools and methodologies to explore these associations. If you do not have expertise in using geographic tools and methodologies, you can leverage local resources in your community such as universities and county health departments. 

Rad Resources:

Hospitalizations for substance abuse disorders before and after Hurricane Katrina: Spatial clustering and area level predictors, New Orleans, 2004 and 2008.  

“A Process Guide to Monitoring and Evaluation for Informed Decision Making” provides evaluators with an overview of geospatial analysis techniques and ways to apply geospatial analysis within the context of M&E, along with additional resources.

 

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello!  My name is Nicole Henley, an Assistant Professor and Health Care Management Program Coordinator in the Department of Health Science and Human Ecology at California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB).  My research interests are access to health care for vulnerable populations and social determinants of health.  The main courses I teach are: Health Services Administration, Statistics, and Social Determinants of Health.  As a 2016-17 MSI Fellow, our cohort examined the Intersection Between Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE).

My contribution to the group project focused on the Health and Health Care domain of the SDOH framework, and the importance of incorporating CRE in the theoretical framework of health-related programs addressing the complex needs of vulnerable populations. 

Lessons Learned: Vulnerable populations have different needs than the general population; Therefore, it’s important to examine the roles of structural and environmental factors, and their affect and effect on this group’s overall health and health outcomes.  Their health and health care challenges intersect with social determinants of health and when “culture” is embedded in the theory, design, and practice of evaluation, systematic errors, cultural biases, and stereotypes are reduced (AEA, 2011), and as a result, the program produces valid and reliable results, and improved population health outcomes and quality of life for this population.

Rad Resource:

If you’re interested in learning more about culturally-appropriate theory that takes into account the complex needs of vulnerable populations, read the article, “Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations: Application to Medical Care Use and Outcomes for Homeless People” (Gelberg, L. et al, 2000).

Rad Resource:

Time for Change Foundation (TFCF) is a non-profit organization in San Bernardino, CA that has integrated the “culture” of the vulnerable population they serve in the theory and design of their Homes for Hope Program, which is a permanent supportive housing program that assist homeless families in becoming self-sufficient by placing them directly into their own apartment and providing intensive case management and support services.  TFCF currently has 13 scattered-site locations throughout San Bernardino, CA. TFCF is one of many community-based organizations making a difference in the lives of vulnerable populations.  To learn more about TFCF’s success stories, please visit their website: http://www.timeforchangefoundation.org/.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings! I am Naomi Hall-Byers, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. I am also a 2017 Minority Serving Institution fellow. During last year’s annual conference, my cohort and I explored the intersection between the social determinants of health (SDOH) and culturally responsive evaluation (CRE). SDOH are social and environmental factors affecting an individual’s health and quality of life. This article focuses on one SDOH, social and cultural context. According to Healthy People 2020, social and community context may include factors such as social cohesion, civic participation, discrimination, incarceration, social networks, norms, and social capital. As an applied social psychologist, with a background in public health, I am acutely aware of the importance of understanding social and cultural context. I provide some thoughts on how to incorporate this SDOH into health focused evaluations.

Lessons Learned: If we want to make a bigger impact on health, as evaluators, we have to move away from focusing primarily on individuals. Individual behavior is important, but behavior still takes place within the context of the social environment. This context is both complex and intersectional, and ultimately influences the program and its evaluation components.

Lesson Learned: It is important to situate CRE within elements of an evaluation framework. The key is to embed CRE throughout the evaluation process. One way to do this is to create and conduct an evaluation WITH the organization, and not FOR the organization. Understanding the cultural context in which the project/program operates, and being responsive to it, will create stronger cooperation, trust, collaboration, and engagement. This will ultimately produce better data, which can strengthen the organization, and the community it serves.

In closing, it is important for health-focused evaluators to seek to understand how each of the five SDOH areas intersects with CRE in ways that affect the health status of individuals and the communities in which they live.

Rad Resources: For more information on the social determinants of health visit Healthy People 2020: https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-of-health, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/cdcprograms/index.htm

For more information on culturally responsive evaluation, and access to a plethora of resources, visit the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment: https://crea.education.illinois.edu/

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! My name is Juan J. DelaCruz, Associate Professor at the Department of Economics and Business of Lehman College (Bronx) and Associated Faculty of the School of Public Health and Health Policy (Harlem) both within the City University of New York, a complex of more than 25 junior and senior colleges serving a highly diverse population across the 5 boroughs. Lehman College serves several minority groups across race/ethnicity (Hispanics and Blacks), age (undergraduate students older than 25 years in average), income status (low income), and educational background (first college attendees in their families). We have a School of Public Health and a Department of Economics and Business that operate in isolation, thus there is a need for stronger collaboration in disciplines that intersect areas of common knowledge such as health economics and economic evaluation.

As a result of my engagement in the Minority-Serving Institution Program of the AEA, I proposed two different courses that initiate the groundwork for stronger quantitative tools for health scientist and public health devises for economist interested in human capital in the form of health. The first proposal was Health Economics as an undergraduate course covering topics in the intersection of economics and health (individual and public). Economics helps improve our perception of health markets, economic costs, planning (short- and long term), etc. This course introduces an analysis of health market structures; demand and supply for healthcare; insurance and funding mechanisms; performance of the health care sector from a theoretical perspective as well as provides a comparative analysis of the US healthcare system. The second proposal was Economic Evaluation of Health Programs using cost-utility, -benefit and -effectiveness analyses. Applications of economic evaluation in healthcare programs have increasingly gained importance in the literature of health sciences and among practitioners. This course introduces how to assessment health and healthcare from an economic point of view. Economic evaluation approaches are significant to better understand resource allocation under scarcity and uncertainty. These courses were recently approved by college officials and are ready to go!

Lessons Learned:

Economic evaluation is a significant tool to assess program implementation in health sciences. Its contribution in regards to culturally responsive evaluation has been misunderstood due to its quantitative nature and rigid framework. As mentioned in a previous blog, any discipline regardless of its orientation can be helpful for this purpose if the goal is to include culture and its context. The creation of these courses, beyond its scholarly contribution, has the purpose to build collaboration within academic department. The ultimate goal is to create an interdisciplinary minor in medical doctors, public health specialists, sociologist, social workers and other sciences intermingle with economic methods.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

My name is Arthur Hernandez and I am a Professor at the University of the Incarnate Word. I have served as evaluator and teacher of evaluation and am very interested in the processes of cultural responsiveness in practice.

Lesson Learned: It seems to be generally accepted that cultural context influences the manner in which individuals perceive and understand reality and cultural context is a matter of development, identity and the foundation for making judgments about value.  Thus, the inclusion of means of and mechanisms for Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE) in our practice is requisite to competent, ethical practice.

Hot Tip:  It is essential to invest in self-assessment.  All too often the effort to engage in CRE involves solely examining participants to determine the impact of identifiable culture on their perception, perspectives and behavior.   While this is certainly important, it is equally important to be aware of or to engage in inquiry to ascertain not usually recognized elements of culture and of how these potentially alternative ways of knowing and valuing may be in influencing the dynamic or interest much less how they might conflict with the culture of the evaluator as well as other important stakeholders.  At a minimum, this self-assessment should be concerned with knowledge, attitudes, familiarity and acceptance.  Knowledge about the community in which the evaluation will take place is essential for development of meaningful metrics and methods.  Gauging attitudes about the community and its values and expectations is essential to ensure that contact with the members is respectful and reasonable (to them).  Familiarity deals with the necessity of establishing meaningful (as opposed to utilitarian) relationships with members of the community and acceptance is the requirement that evaluators understand differences as legitimate and of value in their own right.

Rad Resources: Some good starting point references include:

  • C. Griffith & B. Montrosse-Moorhead (Eds.), Revisiting truth, beauty, and justice: Evaluating with validity in the 21st century. New Directions for Evaluation, 142.
  • Thompson-Robinson, M., Hopson, R., SenGupta, S. (Eds.), In search of cultural competence in evaluation. New Directions for Evaluation,

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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We are both AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellows this year with specialization in two related disciplines. The first author, Cirecie West-Olatunji is a counselor educator at Xavier University of Louisiana and Chandra Story is a faculty member in Health Education and Promotion/Pubic Health at Oklahoma State University. As we conclude our year long fellowship with AEA, we have gravitated to discussions on culturally responsive program evaluation. Most salient in our discussions have been topics focusing on the role of the evaluator in minimizing hegemony in evaluation design, data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

For the past several decades scholars have advanced knowledge about the hidden values implicit in program evaluation design and interpretation. In a 2014 report, the Centers for Disease Control stated that cultural values can influence community members’ theory of change processes (i.e., their perceptions and associated behaviors related to the issues of concern). Such cultural myopia can also influence policymakers’ decisions affecting the community and delivery of services by practitioners. Thus, culturally skewed perspectives can have long-lasting effects on marginalized individuals, families, and communities. In considering ways to increase self-awareness of intellectual colonization and bias among evaluators, we have devised a list of three hot tips that can be used by practicing evaluators that can move us from cultural destructiveness to cultural proficiency on the cultural competence continuum.

Hot Tips:

#1: Increase Self-awareness

Start with a self-inventory in which you reflect on your own values that serve to guide your evaluation practices. Also, consider how these values may be in conflict with the community you are evaluating as well as how your beliefs may reflect inconsistencies or myths about the community stakeholders. Self-awareness also includes an awareness of relative privilege.

#2: Increase Community Knowledge

After reflecting on how your values are embedded in your evaluation practices, take the time to learn more about the history, strengths, and worldviews of the community with whom you are developing the evaluation plan (The Colorado Trust,  2007). Read archival information or engage in meaningful dialogue with community representatives. In addition, it may be helpful to access a cultural broker– one who can mediate between cultures.

#3: Increase Culturally Responsive Evaluation Skills

Actively enhance your culturally responsive evaluation competence by participating in professional development trainings (online webinars or local/national conference presentations). Additionally, read journal articles, books, and digital resources available on the web.

As a guiding principle, it is important that we demonstrate cultural sensitivity in which empathy, trust, and respect are highlighted in our actions. Only then can we increase our credibility in seeking truths about program effectiveness in diverse settings.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Art Hernandez and I am a Visiting Professor at University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas.

I participated in the second yearlong experience of the AEA Minority Serving Institutions Fellowship program and have served as the Director for several cohorts most recently this past year.  I teach and practice Evaluation and am very interested in the operationalization of and the development of metrics related to cultural responsiveness in practice.   I am a member of the Indigenous, Multicultural and La Red TIGS (Topical Information Groups).

Lesson Learned:

Evaluation theory and practice (including issues and ideas related to Cultural Responsiveness) is constantly evolving and developing.  A unique academic and professional discipline, Evaluation is informed by advances in and elaborations of the “state of the science and art” of inquiry constructed from a variety of scientific and social scientific disciplines. The result is that its “expert” practitioners and theorists must be familiar with and consider diverse literature from an ever widening range of disciplines and be prepared to challenge and revise their thinking and practice.  This year’s cohort recognized the need for multi- and interdisciplinary thinking in Evaluation realizing the benefits and sharing their discoveries.

Hot Tip:  

“Expert” Evaluators recognize and endeavor to learn as much as possible related to the great variety of modes of inquiry recognizing the connection of this to the multiple ways of knowing and its importance as one way to assure cultural responsiveness.

Rad Resources:

Aidan Kenny (2006).  Evaluation: Emergence, Mode of Inquiry, Theory & Practice.  https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=946402 (Retrieved 12-14-16)

Bijal A Balasubramanian; Deborah J Cohen; Melinda M Davis; Rose Gunn; L Miriam Dickinson; William L Miller; Benjamin F Crabtree and Kurt C Stange (2015).  Implementation Science 10:31.  DOI: 10.1186/s13012-015-0219-z

http://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-015-0219-z (Retrieved 12-14-16)

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello. My name is Julia Lechuga and I am honored to be part of the AEA 2015 Minority Serving Institution (MSI) fellowship program. This year’s cohort was tasked with inquiring the manner in which different academic fields conceptualize the practice of culturally competent evaluation. Deep thought regarding the meaning of this statement for the practice of evaluation within my profession led me to ponder about the following question: in what way could a health psychologist contribute to make evaluations more culturally competent? My attempt at answering this question follows:

Lesson Learned: Division 38 of the American Psychological Association is the leading professional organization for health psychologists. Division 38 defines a health psychologist as a professional “engaged in academic research, professional practice, in clinical, occupational, and acute health care settings” (APA Division 38, 2015, “what is a health psychologist”). Regarding academic research, an intricate part of a health psychologist’s training is to become well-versed in behavior change research theory, espousing the individual determinants of health, to evaluate the effect of implemented behavior change interventions to better the health of ethnic minority, medically underserved individuals. It is in this tradition that I wish to highlight a potential opportunity within the field to facilitate cultural competency in gauging the merit of particular initiatives.

When looking at the state of the field regarding the behavior change theories that are currently guiding research and practice in the field, it is inevitably to notice the dearth of theories espousing the role of culture and cultural context in behavior change. In fact, a recent review indicates that researchers and practitioners continue to rely predominantly on behavior change theories such as the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior to inform the development and testing of behavior change health interventions aimed at bettering the health of ethnic minorities. These theories fall short of delineating important determinants of health, at the individual level, that influence the health of ethnic minority population as these theories were developed and tested in affluent ethnic majority populations.

Hot Tip: As a potential solution, I would like to advocate for the intra-disciplinary collaboration between cross-cultural and health psychologists as a way to increase the cultural competency, research methods wise, of health psychologists. Cross-cultural psychology is making headway in the expansion of theory to account for the influence of culture on health-related behavior. The integration of cross-cultural research findings into evaluation practice within health psychology will pave the way for a more culturally competent health psychology evaluation theory and practice.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I am Andrea Guajardo, MPH and I am the Director of Community Health at CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Health System in San Antonio, Texas. I am also a doctoral student seeking the PhD in Education at the University of the Incarnate Word, and I enjoyed the distinct honor of being selected to participate in the Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Faculty Fellowship Program in 2013-2014.

My acceptance to the MSI Faculty Fellowship Program came as a surprise because I am not a faculty member of an institution that possesses this designation. I am not a faculty member of any institution. Despite the fact that I did not fit the typical mold of previous MSIs, I applied for the fellowship based on my experience in evaluation within the context of hospital operations, grant administration, and community-based programming.   My year as an MSI produced personal growth as an evaluator, and it also allowed me to share my perspective with my fellow MSIs – all of whom are accomplished evaluators and faculty from around the United States and Puerto Rico.

Interaction within our cohort often led to discussions of evaluation theory, models, and applications that I had not considered as a hospital-based evaluator. In return, I offered my pragmatic, “real-world” approach to evaluation. My year as an MSI has facilitated a rapid development of a skill set as an internal evaluator that I could not have acquired from workshops and textbooks and enabled me to share a more robust understanding of evaluation among my clinical colleagues in the hospital.

AEA is a dynamic organization comprised of evaluators from multiple disciplines, philosophies, and theoretical perspectives. It is also home to evaluators whose backgrounds are not rooted in academia and theory. My year in the MSI program allowed me to experience evaluation from multiple viewpoints and to clearly identify my own perspective and path as an evaluator in hospital operations and in academia.

Lessons Learned: Don’t label yourself. Seek opportunities for growth in evaluation even if you do not necessarily fit into a defined category as an evaluator.   Don’t pass up an opportunity at AEA because you don’t “fit the mold.” Take a chance and you might find that others can learn as much from you as you learn from them.

Lesson Learned: Seek out colleagues from different disciplines and perspectives. Although the MSI program is a formal process, you don’t have to be an MSI to engage evaluators whose experiences, backgrounds, and skill sets differ from yours. Shared knowledge benefits then entire AEA community.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

My name is Edilberto A. Raynes. I am an Associate Professor from the Tennessee State University. I am one of the five MSI Fellows from 2013-2014. I am coming in to the fellowship program with minimal background in evaluation. However, I have broad experiences in conducting social research in an academic institution. I have noticed that there were differences between conducting evaluative research and purely evaluative research, which include constructing a survey, writing a report, and conducting a presentation.

Lessons Learned:

  • It is best to know the background of the stakeholders, the recipient of the report, the timeline, and the budget.
  • Rubrics are utilized to facilitate framing of survey questions and to interpret quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods.
  • Logic models include five core components: inputs, outputs, outcomes, assumptions, and external factors. These components are very valuable in mapping out the evaluative process.
  • There is culture in the art of evaluation. There is a need to increase awareness of creating a culturally responsive evaluation.
  • The art of writing non-evaluative questions. The use of proper verbiage such as “Was it any good? To what extent?
  • The use of focus group as a form of evaluation.

Hot Tip: Attend the workshops that you are interested in exploring because you will find new information. These workshops include, but are not limited to AEA pre-conference workshops or professional development workshops in general. In my case, I learned a lot in the pre-conference workshops. Collaborate with colleagues because that is the only way one can establish relationships. Once relationships have been established, one is able to build tools in evaluative thinking.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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