AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | literature review

Greetings! My name is Dr. Kristin Abner, and I work at ICF International, a consulting firm offering professional services and technology-based solutions to government and commercial clients. I work in the Education, Community & Social Programs Division of ICF’s Social & Analytic Solutions Group. I’d like to share a relevant resource to evaluators, as well as human service professionals and policymakers. Professionally, it’s a project that I work on, and personally, a project that I could have used time and again during graduate school…when a professor asked me to compile literature around a specific topic. The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) is an initiative funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. The SSRC houses an extensive and ever-growing virtual library of peer-reviewed research, evaluation studies, policy briefs, and other high quality resource materials across many domains of self-sufficiency, such as housing and community development. It also offers a forum for dialogue among and between researchers, practitioners, and policymakers, and others who work in the self-sufficiency, employment, family, and child well-being arenas. Whether you are conducting a review of research about food insecurity, developing a practice guide on TANF, or analyzing data on the Supplemental Poverty Measure, the SSRC can help support and enhance those efforts.

Hot Tips:

  • The SSRC Library includes over 5500 self-sufficiency resources that can be filtered by topic, subtopic, keyword, year, publisher, geographic focus, research methodology, and/or target population. These filters can help evaluators and those interested in evaluation find research with similar analytic methods. I find the search feature helpful when I am compiling a literature review and want to view all resources that include a randomized control trial in the area of food assistance, for example. I also love how the Library has a citation assistance tool!
  • The SSRC’s “Browse Topics” section includes resources in each of its topic areas that highlights research and resources recommended by the SSRC Library Team. So, if you want the seminal research or most relevant resource in a topical area, you can start there. This might be helpful for grant writers looking for a data or proof point on a topic to enhance their proposal.
  • The SSRC also has a section on how to Use Data– which includes tools and tips for understanding and applying research methodologies and datasets. It also list datasets relevant to self-sufficiency and poverty. You may want to pull datasets to run statistical analyses or assess the types of information national surveys collect relating to self-sufficiency or poverty before planning an evaluation.

To stay up-to-date with the SSRC, sign up for its listserv and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

 

 

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Hi! I’m Laura Sefton, Project Analyst in the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Center for Health Policy and Research. The school’s Lamar Soutter Library gives me access to a database of peer-reviewed journals and resources like Science Citation Index and PubMed to inform the literature searches and survey instrument research that I conduct for many evaluation projects. I have found Google Scholar to be an complementary source for access to materials that might not be available in the library’s databases. Below are a few tips and tricks for getting the most out of this resource.

Google Scholar is free to access and available anywhere you have an internet connection. Keywords, author names, and/or titles can all be used as search terms. Results include scholarly works as well as grey literature, including peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed journal articles, conference presentations, technical reports, and theses. Google searches across the web and pulls its results from publishers (free and subscription-based), professional associations, university repositories, and anywhere materials are available.

Hot Tip: Use the options listed in the left sidebar to narrow your search to specific time periods or to sort results by date. Results are, by default, shown in order of their relevance to your search terms, and the top articles may not be the most recent.

Hot Tip: Use the down arrow located to the right of the search box to refine your search. Options include searching by exact wording or without certain words.

Rad Resources: Below each search result are two features that can enhance your searches.

  • The Cited by function denotes how many times the article has been cited in a journal. Frequently cited papers will be closer to the top of your search results. Click on the hyperlink to see those articles, which may or may not be related to your topic of interest, depending on why they were cited.
  • To see other articles that are similar to the search result, click on Related articles.

Cool Trick: The Cite function, which also appears below each search result, shows the result in several citation formats, including MLA, APA, and Chicago, which can be copied and pasted directly into your report. You can also import the reference directly into a bibliography manager via the Cite function’s pop-up box. You’ll want to review each entry, however, since it may not import complete citation information.

Hot Tip: Set up email alerts to receive notifications when new articles related to your search terms are available. This can be particularly helpful if you are interested in the latest information.

Rad Resources: See previous posts by Molly Higgins and Len Levin, my colleagues in the Lamar Soutter Library, for additional literature resources.

Happy hunting!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! We are Monica Hargraves and Miranda Fang, from the Cornell Office for Research on Evaluation.  We presented together at Eval2012 would like to share some practical tips on literature searches in the context of evaluation.

2016 Update: Monica Hargraves is now Associate Director for Evaluation Partnerships at the Cornell Office for Research on Evaluation; Miranda Fang is now Manager, Development Strategy and Operations at Teach For America – Los Angeles

Program managers often face an expectation worthy of Hercules: to provide strong research-quality evidence that their program is effective in producing valuable outcomes. This is daunting, particularly if the valued outcomes only emerge over a long time horizon, the program is new or small, or the appropriate evaluation is way beyond the capacity of the program.  The question is, what can bridge the gap between what’s feasible for the program and what’s needed in terms of evidence?

Hot Tip: Strategic literature searches can help. And visual program logic models provide an ideal framework for organizing the search process.

Quoting our colleagues Jennifer Urban and William Trochim in their AJE 2009 paper on the Golden Spike,

The golden spike is literally a place that can be drawn on the visual causal map … where the evaluation results and the research evidence meet.”

We use pathway models, which build on a columnar logic model and tell the logical story of the program by specifying the connections between the activities and the short-term outcome(s) they each contribute to, and the subsequent short- or mid-term outcome(s) that those lead to, and so on.  What emerges is a visual program theory with links all the way through to the program’s anticipated long-term outcomes.

The visual model organizes and makes succinct the key elements of the program theory. It helps an evaluator to zero in on the particular outcomes and causal links that are needed in order to build credible evidence beyond the scope of their current evaluation.

Here’s an example, from a Cornell Cooperative Extension program on energy conservation in a youth summer camp.  Suppose the program needs to report to a key funder whose interest is in youth careers in the environmental sector. If the program evaluation demonstrates that the program is successful in building a positive attitude towards green energy careers, then a literature search can focus on evidence for the link (where the red star is) between that mid-term outcome and the long-term outcome of an increase in youth entering the green workforce.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Best of aea365, an occasional series. The contributions for Best of aea365 are reposts of great blog articles from our earlier years. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! I’m Julie Goldman, a librarian at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Lamar Soutter Library. I want to introduce you to a number of high-quality public health resources, most of them freely available, and all that can help you as evaluators understand and support your communities, your research, and your work. Public health information comes in many different forms from education materials, research articles, white papers, and policies to raw data on lifestyle characteristics, disease prevalence, healthcare utilization – or, basically, all scientific output that applies to day-to-day life.

Here are a few takeaways when looking for public health information:

 Lessons Learned:

  • Public health is multidisciplinary; it is not just doctors and nurses! Other fields include:
    • Health educators
    • Community planners and policy makers (e.g., local, regional or state health boards)
    • Scientists and researchers
    • Biostatisticians
    • Occupational health and safety professionals
  • Health promotion should happen everywhere – and include everyone!
    • Information should be available to all communities, domestic and international
    • Addressing health disparities should be a key focus. Examples include: healthcare access, infectious diseases, environmental hazards, violence, substance abuse, and injury.

Hot Tips: Evidence-based practices inform decisions:

  • Using the best available scientific evidence leads to informed decisions
  • Pro-active prevention can lead to measurable impact
  • Spending on prevention saves money long-term

Visit the American Public Health Association’s website for public health news, webinars and useful infographics like the one below that visually tell the public health story. Many of these (or similar ones from a variety of sources) can be used to help relay the messages of evaluation data.

Goldman 1

Public Health Infographic, © 2016, American Public Health Association

Rad Resources: The table below provides a brief overview of many of the public health collections that offer freely available resources on populations, agencies, public health news and policy briefs, and much more.

GoldmanLamar Soutter Library Evidence-Based Public Health Portal.
A collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health sciences libraries highlighting news, public health topics, policies, jobs, and education.
The National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, offer many public health resources such as Haz-Mat, Toxnet, and IRIS.
A free, digital archive of scientific research and literature.
Explore and evaluate projects aimed at reducing racial and ethnic health disparities. From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
The world’s most comprehensive collection of population, family planning and related reproductive health and development literature.
An image-based review of world demographics and statistics.

 

Many libraries, at both public and private institutions, as well as public libraries can assist with evaluation and research, and access to all levels of public health information. Many librarians are highly motivated to work with a research and/or evaluation team to help navigate public health data and resources. Re-read these two blog postings from previous years to learn more about collaborating with a librarian to help explore the vast array of information that can help with the development, conduct, and analysis of evaluation projects: “Library Resources and the Important Role They Play in Evaluation Work” and “Today’s Librarian and Building an Evaluation Team.”

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Sebastian. Before pursuing my PhD at UCLA, I served as a senior evaluation consultant at Ramboll Management – a Copenhagen-based consulting firm. My current interests revolve around research syntheses and causal modeling techniques.

A common practice in evaluation is to examine the existing body of evidence of the type of intervention to be evaluated. The most well established approach is perhaps the generic literature review, often provided as a setting-the-scene segment in evaluation reports. The purpose of today’s tip is to push for a more interpretive approach when coding findings from existing evaluations.

The approach – called causation coding – is grounded in qualitative data analysis. In the words of Saldaña (2013), causation coding is appropriate for discerning motives (by or toward something or someone), belief systems, worldviews, processes, recent histories, interrelationships, and the complexity of influences and affects on human actions and phenomena (p.165).

In its practical application, causation coding aims to map out causal chains (CODE1 > CODE2 > CODE3), corresponding to a delivery mechanism, an outcome, and a mediator linking the delivery mechanism and outcome (ibid). These types of causal triplets are often made available in evaluation reports, as authors explain how and why the evaluated intervention generated change.

In a recent review of M4P Market development programs, I employed causation coding to capture causally relevant information in 13 existing evaluations and to develop hypotheses about how and why these programs generate positive outcomes. The latter informed the evaluation of a similar market development program.

Lessons Learned:

(1) It is important to award careful attention to the at times conflated distinction between empirically supported and hypothetically predicted causal chains. The latter express how the author(s) intended the program to work. In many evaluation studies, the eagerness to predict the success of the intervention often contributes to the inclusion of these hypothetical scenarios in results sections. Attention should be awarded the empirically supported causal chains.

(2) Causal chains are rarely summarized in a three-part sequence from cause(s) to mechanism(s) to outcome(s). As such, causation coding often involves a high degree of sensitivity to words such as “because”, “in effect”, “therefore” and “since” that might indicate an underlying causal logic (ibid).

Rad Resource: The coding manual for qualitative researchers (second edition) by Saldaña.

We’re celebrating 2-for-1 Week here at aea365. With tremendous interest in the blog lately, we’ve had many authors eager to share their evaluation wisdom, so for one special week, readers will be treated to two blog posts per day! Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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We are Judy Savageau and Len Levin from the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Center for Health Policy and Research (CHPR) and Lamar Soutter Library, respectively. Back in November, we introduced you to a week’s worth of lessons learned, hot tips and rad resources for how the literature (written and electronic) and various databases provide key information and tools that we need to conduct all types of evaluation projects (see “Related Posts” for some of these, or type “literature search” in the search box to find all of them). Partnering with our medical school’s library and its resources has been key to CHPR’s many successes. We wanted to continue these discussions with this blog on “What Does Today’s Librarian Look Like?”

Not too long ago, accessing public libraries and all of their resources was done almost exclusively via paper-based systems where you needed to be present ‘in’ the library to access all of its resources. Connection to a reference librarian was ‘physical’ – mostly in-person and sometimes via a land-line telephone. Library patrons accessed print resources through large tomes of written words. So what’s changed to help improve information needs for our evaluation work? Today’s library is more active than passive. Information is available in real-time and most of it electronically accessible. Today’s librarian is often working ‘outside’ of the library’s physical space partnering on-site with key stakeholder groups and/or evaluation teams. And, when necessary, the librarian and his/her resources can easily have a virtual presence in the work we do.

Lessons Learned:

  • New partnerships: Today’s librarian doesn’t necessarily need a “building” to be effective. They don’t always sit at a Reference Desk waiting for a question to come to them (but if you call your local library, you WILL find someone to help you). Instead, they work where the information is needed whether with an individual or a team.
  • Active approach: Before, if you were researching dragons in medieval castles, you would have to come by the library every now and then to see if there was any new information. Now, if you work closely with a librarian and they know that your interest is dragons and medieval castles, they will push information to you as it comes across their radar. And since librarians are usually working on many different projects with many different people or teams simultaneously, it is likely that they will come across new things often. There are a lot of efficiencies in library resources when librarians are supporting multiple teams/projects.

Hot Tip: Instead of just consulting with a librarian on your next project, consider adding one to your project team. Having a librarian as part of your team will help to more efficiently identify needed resources and access them.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello, we are Judy Nordberg and Nancy Harger, librarians at the Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School. So now you have some new ideas of where and how to find good information/data. But how can you manage all of it? Some of you may harken back to the “old days” of writing college essays – hours spent trying to re-locate that resource you quoted and then more hours, often late at night, working with a typewriter and a bottle of White Out finishing footnotes and bibliographies. That was then, citation management tools are now!

Hot Tips: At UMass, we support two of these bibliographic citation management tools – RefWorks and EndNote. These are both commercial products that help manage your work from inception through completion of a manuscript. If you search many of the resources that were discussed in earlier posts this week, there are ways to import the citations you find directly into citation managers. Then, the citations are easily findable and accurate. Some tools like EndNote have the ability to crawl the Internet and automatically import full-text in PDF when available. Even if your manager does not have this capability, chances are you can still store PDF full-text within the citation record so the two remain together. Most managers also allow you to create multiple folders that can organize multiple projects from one account. Searching and sorting are usually available as well. And some have small downloadable Microsoft Word add-ons for easy input and manipulation of citations within your manuscript or report based on the output style wanted or required by a publisher. With a high-end manager like EndNote, there are thousands of styles based on periodicals from many disciplines readily available.

If you work in an academic institution, check with your library as you may have network access to EndNote or RefWorks right at your desktop. If not, there are a number of free online tools like Papers, Zotero, and Mendeley. Mendeley also acts as a social media tool, allowing you to collect citations and share lists with others.

Rad Resources: There are many more things you can do with a bibliographic citation management tool than can be described here. A good place to get additional information is the Wikipedia page linked below. This page not only tells you about the many tools out there, it also includes a number of tables comparing the features of each tool for functionality such as importing, exporting, Word compatibility and more.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_reference_management_software

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Literature Search Strategy Week with our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The contributions all this week are about using libraries, librarians, and library resources for evaluation projects. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! My name is Lisa Palmer. I’m a librarian in the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

As my colleague Molly Higgins pointed out in her Top Ten Databases blog post earlier this week, PubMed is a key database to search for biomedical literature. The goal of this post is to alert you to My NCBI, a tool available for PubMed that allows you to save citations and searches and customize your results display. It’s easy to use and will help you stay organized and up-to-date with journal articles relevant to your research, especially for those longitudinal projects!

Palmer

Hot Tip: Register for a My NCBI account

  • Go to http://pubmed.gov
  • Click Sign in to NCBI in the upper right corner
  • Click Register for an NCBI account
  • Click “Keep me signed in” to automatically activate My NCBI each time you use PubMed
  • Access and manage your saved searches, collections, and customizations from the My NCBI link in the upper right corner of the PubMed home page

Hot Tip: Save search strategies and receive email updates. You can permanently save PubMed search strategies to be retrieved as needed or to be run periodically with search results emailed to you.

  • Run a search and click Save search under the Search box
  • Follow the prompts to name the search and set up email updates

Hot Tip: Save citations to permanent collections. You can save citations from search results to be retrieved as needed. Use Favorites or Collections to create an unlimited number of individual collections of citations that can continue to be built over time. Use My Bibliography to create a collection of your own publications (both PubMed citations and items not in PubMed).

  • Run a search
  • Select desired citations
  • Use the Send To drop-down menu to send to Collections or My Bibliography

Hot Tip: Customize the PubMed display. Use NCBI Site Preferences to customize your PubMed display. Common preferences include:

  • Highlighting search terms in color in search results
  • Customizing the search results display to set default values for display format, number of items displayed per page, and sorting order

Cool Trick: Sharing Collections. My NCBI collections are set as Private by default. You can share a collection by changing this setting in Collections from Private to Public. A URL and HTML code are provided – use the URL to share with others and the HTML code to post onto a web page.

Rad Resources:

My NCBI Help

PubMed Tutorial – My NCBI

My NCBI handout from the U.S. National Network of Libraries of Medicine

PubMed Brief Animated Tutorials

See My NCBI Sections on Saving Searches, Collections and Bibliographies, Preferences and Filters

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Literature Search Strategy Week with our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The contributions all this week are about using libraries, librarians, and library resources for evaluation projects. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Len Levin and I am a librarian at the Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Using the databases and search tips outlined in the previous two posts for this week can go a long way to finding good information when conducting research and evaluation projects. But what happens when you still can’t find an answer using these tools? Or what if you need to conduct a thoroughly comprehensive search and need to make absolutely certain that you’ve left “no stone unturned?”

Hot Tips: This is where Grey Literature comes in. Grey Literature usually refers to anything that has not been published in a traditional format or, in library parlance, “lacks bibliographic control” meaning it can be hard to look up. This includes things such as conference proceedings, conference posters, dissertations and theses, government/institutional reports and raw data. But how can you find this type of material?

Luckily, much of it is now online. Many academic institutions now host “Institutional Repositories” where the above materials are collected from faculty and students. If you know of an institution, researcher or evaluator at an institution that specializes in your topic of interest, start on their web page.

Or try Google Scholar, a sub-set of Google that focuses results on scholarly resources, often times pointing directly to the full text. It is estimated that Google Scholar now links upwards of 160 million documents. Many libraries have linked Google Scholar to their holdings so if something is not readily available online, you might be able to find out where to get it.

Government agencies – federal, state, provincial, etc. – also generate many reports that contain excellent data. If you’re looking for climate data, try the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) home page. Healthcare? Try the NIH (National Institutes of Health) or the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research Quality). Or professional association sites like the American Public Health Association can provide a wealth of information through online policy statements.

I would bet that many of you are exposed to one type of grey literature on a daily basis – that being blogs, Tweets or Facebook postings. Yes, these social media tools can also be a great place to locate valuable information not found elsewhere.

Rad Resources: Here are some “rad resources” to further help you find Grey Literature:

Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.com

Grey Net International: http://www.greynet.org/home.html

NTIS (National Technical Information Service): http://www.ntis.gov

N.Y. Academy of Medicine Grey Literature Report: http://www.greylit.org/home

Clinical Trials.gov: http://clinicaltrails.gov

Data.gov: http://data.gov

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Literature Search Strategy Week with our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The contributions all this week are about using libraries, librarians, and library resources for evaluation projects. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, my name is Martha Meacham, a librarian at the Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Searching for information is a treasure hunt. The words you use to construct your search can be the map. Librarians make excellent escorts for your explorations, but if you are venturing on your own, it pays to be prepared with a good vocabulary roadmap.

Hot Tips: Once you have selected where to search (see the recent blog on Top 10 databases), realize that every place uses a different set of rules. The words used to index, categorize, and organize content are deliberately chosen to reflect the subjects covered in the database. This is often called a controlled vocabulary or thesaurus. As a medical librarian, I am particularly familiar with MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) the National Library of Medicine’s controlled vocabulary, but there are many others. The database ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) has its own thesaurus. Google uses complex, proprietary web crawling, indexing, and algorithms to take the words you enter and bring back relevant results. Ovid, LexisNexis, etc. all have different search languages and structures.

Lessons Learned: An important distinction is the difference between keyword searching or using the controlled vocabulary. You can use any word as a keyword. Generally, for most databases, searching by keyword means that it will look for that word(s) anywhere, in any context, in any order. However, you will probably get irrelevant results.

A controlled vocabulary provides the exact words the database staff assign to content. These terms are applied to results because they reflect the subject or content of that result. Searching using this vocabulary may retrieve more relevant results but may miss relevant articles that were not categorized with that term.

Another trick to searching is realizing there is usually more than one route to the destination. You want to use many different words to describe your concept. I recommend keeping a list of synonyms. Using the controlled vocabulary of a database can be useful in finding alternative words. For example, “heart attack” is not a MeSH term, but Myocardial Infarction is. Additionally, the MeSH result for this example also points to narrower terms like “Shock, Cardiogenic” or broader terms such as “Myocardial Ischemia.” Searching these alternatives could enrich your search.

Rad Resources: Knowing a little more about the vocabulary of a database, or the way a search engine like Google interprets your words, will help you structure a search in that system which will retrieve the most useful and relevant results. By using many different skills, tricks, tactics – many found in this week’s blog posts – you will be well-equipped for a successful information treasure hunt.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Literature Search Strategy Week with our colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The contributions all this week are about using libraries, librarians, and library resources for evaluation projects. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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