AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | languages

Hello! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with a fabulous learning opportunity for evaluators who work with linguistically diverse stakeholders (and I’ll bet that’s most of us!), and are concerned with cultural competence in our evaluation work.

Duolingo is a crowdsourced, engaging, gamified, free language learning platform whose “ultimate goal is to give everyone access to a private tutor experience through technology.” They claim to be the largest online language learning platform with 100 million students.

Lesson Learned: I found 27 different languages offered on Duolingo including Turkish, Portuguese, Norwegian, Irish, Swahili, Russian, Korean, and, interestingly enough… Klingon. When you first access the site, you choose a language and a goal of how many minutes you’re willing to invest in learning. You can set your goal to 5, 10, 15, or 20 minutes per day. Then, you choose your path. Either jump right into the learning, or take a placement test if you think you have some knowledge of the language. This is how I started. Armed with 6 years’ worth of middle and high school French, I was certain I could jump at least one level and so I spent 5-10 minutes translating French phrases into English, and trying to compose French phrases from given English phrases (much harder!). Turns out Duolingo is serious learning! Sadly, I failed to skip ahead and Duolingo placed me at the very beginning.  (In my defense, high school was quite a long time ago!)

Cool Trick: Duolingo also offers languages for speakers of languages other than English. For example, they offer Spanish for Russian speakers, French for Arabic speakers, and German for Italian speakers, among many other options.

Rad Resource: I learned about Duolingo from another great find. I stumbled on an article entitled An In-Depth Guide To Choosing The Best Online Learning Sites which offers a great review and comparisons of MOOCs and other online learning opportunities.

Cool Trick: According to the article, “your achievements [on Duolingo] can be integrated directly into your LinkedIn profile to display from a reputable source your verified language proficiency level.”

Boa sorte! [That’s “good luck” in Portuguese!]

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Greetings! I am Carla Forrest, a staff member and Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. My professional work involves configuration management of scientific and engineering knowledge and information. My passion, however, lies in using appreciative approaches to improve workplace performance.

Rad Resource

Recently I read “The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace” by Dr. Gary Chapman and Dr. Paul White. The authors categorize the five appreciative languages as: (1) words of affirmation; (2) quality time; (3) acts of service; (4) tangible gifts; and (5) physical touch. In the workplace, we often overlook the impact that appreciative inquiry and language have on organizational and individual performance. Authentic appreciation, when expressed in the primary appreciative language of the individual, can be a strong motivator, trust builder, and empowering influence, often uplifting the individual and organization into high performance.

Hot Tip

Appreciation is not recognition or reward. The focus of appreciation is intrinsic. The focus of recognition and reward is extrinsic. Organizational reward and recognition programs focus on performance. Appreciation is personally meaningful, focusing on who a person is. The typical “one size fits all” reward and recognition program is usually managerially directed and impersonal, often lending skepticism as to the genuineness of the leader’s intentions. The ultimate downside to the reward/recognition approach is the cost involved. Motivating through authentic appreciation has no financial cost, but is truly priceless!

In what ways can leaders apply appreciative approaches to transform relationships, attitudes, and performance in the workplace?

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Business, Leadership and Performance (BLP) TIG Week with our colleagues in the BLP AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our BLP TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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