AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | Independent Consulting

My name is Judah Viola and I am a Community Psychologist at National Louis University in Chicago. I also manage an independent consulting practice specializing in program evaluation and collaborative community research.

Whether boom or bust economy, it is never a bad time to build your own evaluation skills and capacity to provide value for clients. Fortunately, there is a plethora of information available about the art and science of evaluation. However, there isn’t much published or taught in universities about how to build your evaluation consulting practice.

Knowing what analyses are appropriate for a particular project and how to conduct them are necessary, but you also need to be able to translate statistics or methodology into language that all stakeholders can understand and utilize for decision making. In addition, you need to know a whole host of other things such as how long the project will take and how much the evaluation is worth to the client.

Thus, for the majority of evaluation consultants, academic training alone is not sufficient preparation, and real word evaluation experience working under others is the preferred option.

Hot Tip: Start with your existing network. Who introduced you to the field of evaluation? Many faculty do evaluation projects and look for students, or early career evaluators to support their work. In addition, many independent consultants subcontract parts of their larger projects out to colleagues and are willing to supervise and train folks with little experience.

If you don’t currently know many evaluation consultants, there are simple ways to build your network.

Hot Tip: Getting involved in local professional development organizations, promotes learning and networking, and opportunities for referrals or collaborations. My involvement in the Chicagoland Evaluation Association (CEA), a local AEA affiliate, has enabled me to connect with evaluators with whom I have worked on evaluation projects, presented at conferences, and published book chapters.

Hot Tip: Contact and listen to experts on the phone, on-line, or at conferences. Initially, I thought that experienced independent evaluation consultants may be too busy or hesitant to talk to a newbie. However, I found that they (especially AEA members) are quite approachable and generous with their time and are quick to share lessons learned so you don’t have to make the same mistakes they did when getting started. I’ve gotten a host of great advice about everything from getting an accountant to how to come up with a pricing strategy.

Rad Resources:

This post is a modified version of a previously published aea365 post in an occasional series, “Best of aea365.” Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Sharon Wasco, and I am a community psychologist and independent consultant. I describe here a recent shift in my language that underscores, I think, important trends in evaluation:

  • I used to pitch evaluation as a way that organizations could “get ahead of” an increasing demand for evidence-based practice (EBP);
  • Now I sell evaluation as an opportunity for organizations to use practice-based evidence (PBE) to increase impact.

I’d like evaluators to seek a better understanding of EBP and PBE in order to actively span the perceived boundaries of these two approaches.

Most formulations of EBP require researcher driven activity — such as randomized controlled trials (RCT) — and clinical experts to answer questions like: “Is the right person doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right place in the right way, with the right result?” (credit: Anne Payne)

In an editorial introduction to a volume on PBE, Anne K. Swisher offers this contrast:

“In the concept of practice-based evidence, the real, messy, complicated world is not controlled. Instead, real world practice is documented and measured, just as it occurs, “warts” and all.

It is the process of measurement and tracking that matters, not controlling how practice is delivered. This allows us to answer a different, but no less important, question than ‘does X cause Y?’ This question is: ‘how does adding X intervention alter the complex personalized system of patient Y before me?’”

Advocates of PBE make a good case that “evidence supporting the utility, value, or worth of an intervention…can emerge from the practices, experiences, and expertise of family members, youth, consumers, professionals and members of the community.

Further exploration should convince you that EBP and PBE are complementary; and that evaluators can be transformative in the melding of the approaches. Within our field, forces driving the utilization of PBE include more internal evaluators, shared value for culturally competent evaluation, a range of models for participatory evaluation, and interest in collaborative inquiry as a process to support professional learning.

Lessons Learned: How we see “science-practice gaps,” and what we do in those spaces, provide unique opportunities for evaluators to make a difference. Metaphorically, EBP is a bridge and PBE is a Midway.

PBE_EBP 2

 

Further elaboration of this metaphor and more of what I’ve learned about PBE can be found in my speaker presentations materials from Penn State’s Third Annual Conference on Child Protection and Well-Being (scroll to the end of the page — I “closed” the event).

Rad Resource: I have used Chris Lysy’s cartoons to encourage others to look beyond the RCT for credible evidence and useful evaluation.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! I’m Jan Upton and have over 25 years of consulting experience; the past 13 spent creating and running Institutional Research Consultants, Ltd. (IRC). Below are lessons for each business life cycle stage that I wished I had known when I started out, and recently learned ones.

Lesson Learned: Inception: Evaluation has a wonderful culture of independent consulting. I attribute this to a group of AEA visionaries who established a strong support system and welcomed newbies with open arms. Had I realized this earlier, my company would have a different name and the first two years probably would have been much easier had I focused on pursuing evaluation-related contracts.

Lesson Learned: Survival: Concerns about survival and cash flow continue despite a company’s growth and longevity. I have experienced and witnessed others who had long-term contracts end abruptly due to unexpected funding cuts or other impossible to foresee circumstances. Viewing consulting as “serial part-time work” and always being open to additional opportunities provides a healthy perspective. IRC usually has 12-15 sources of income, so the probability that all will disappear at once is unlikely. Nevertheless, having 4-5 projects end the same month happens. Projects also vary widely in the amount of profit they represent.

Lesson Learned: Growth and Expansion: Managing growth requires bringing in assistance through subcontracting with other evaluators as well as support services (e.g., transcribing and report editing). I wish I had hired my first employee about five years sooner than I did. Having no guarantee of continued growth is my rationale for not doing so. I now realize that an employee could have helped ensure IRC’s sustained progress.

Lesson Learned: Balance: Balancing work and personal life continues to be my greatest challenge.  Having multiple urgent deadlines at the same time is the norm. Getting to the point where the work load is not all consuming is a goal I’m still working on!

Lesson Learned: Maturity: My firm is a reflection of myself. I provide initial report and data collection templates and have the final say on all project activities. I also have long-term relationships with many clients. As I move toward retirement, I am striving to position IRC to live on without me. Creating a business is in some ways analogous to raising a child—it is difficult to let go! Ultimately, long-term survival is contingent on turning over management to others.

Rad Resources:

Independent Evaluation Consulting: New Directions for Evaluation, No. 111 (2006). Especially see Gail Barrington’s “The Evaluation Consultant’s Life Cycle: Theory, Practice and Implications for Learning.”

Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group

Gail Barrington’s Consulting Start-up and Management: A Guide for Evaluators and Applied Researchers

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

We are Marty Henry and Keith Murray, lead evaluators for M.A. Henry Consulting, LLC in Fairfax, Virginia, and St. Louis, Missouri. The issues noted here stem largely from math and science education program evaluations we have done, but they apply to many evaluation contexts.

The federal funding programs supporting these projects aim at improving teacher and student content knowledge and enhancing teachers’ classroom performance. We collect a wealth of qualitative and quantitative data, especially since partnership, leadership, and school-based team-building are project priorities.

Lessons Learned: Issues often arise about who can access evaluation data containing personal identifiers, particularly with the university-based project teams. We have encountered several challenging situations dealing with providing access to evaluation for purposes outside the original project plans.

In one case, a graduate student wanted data with identifiers for new research in the third year of a five-year project. Participant consent forms signed by the university’s PI stipulated that only the evaluators could access the identifier keys. Even though the university IRB agreed with our interpretation of restrictions, our contract was terminated.

In another case, the project team wanted to use data for analyses outside the specifications of evaluation protocols and consents. Universities usually include a clause in their master contract that the university owns any data or products produced as a result of contractor activities. They insist that any project-derived data can be used for any purpose, regardless of consent specifications. IRBs have been inconsistent in addressing this concern.

These are only two of the issues we’ve faced about the “ownership” of evaluation data.

Hot Tips: We can suggest three steps to help alleviate the ethical issues that can arise for evaluators in such circumstances.

1. Include language in the consents stating that project leadership as well as evaluators may use identifiable data. This approach may reduce participation in evaluation activities, but will enable projects to access evaluation data.

2. Include language in the consents and contracts that evaluators and the institution own the data jointly. Institutional contracts are usually boilerplates that disallow customization. An internal addendum can sometimes be added to institutional contracts to allow this approach.

3. Finally, universities often state that no risk exists in their obtaining and using evaluation data with personal identifiers. While the largest issue here concerns maintaining ethics and the integrity of the human subjects system, we assert that risks potentially are involved, given the qualitative nature and frank sharing that is a part of effective evaluation. In the end, we would prefer that evaluation-specific data not be subsumed in the larger research data pool. Ultimately, our purposes differ, and participants deserve sensitive consideration.

Rad Resource: The EvalTalk list has discussions about data ownership issues.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello, I’m Norma Martinez-Rubin, an independent program evaluator, public health practitioner, and occasional trainer and lecturer. This post is about working solo vs. on subcontracts.

Lessons Learned: As an independent consultant, working solo presents challenging opportunities to apply experiences and formal training that meet client expectations. Doing so affords you additional experience for even greater or more complex future projects, augments your skills and practice tools, and further strengthens the independent streak needed to build a work portfolio composed of sample work representing the successful relationships you and your clients have developed and fostered. Your portfolio validates expertise, distinctiveness, and sense of value about projects of your choice. Project schedules involve fewer parties in the work; you invoice for services directly, and get compensated in amounts that include your administrative, overhead, and consulting fees.

As the primary consultant to a client, your name, image, and reputation are at stake. You are accountable to your client and yourself with regard to project designs, communications, and completed tasks. These considerations are relevant to subcontract work with some variations.

Working on subcontracts requires greater coordination, communication, and occasional compromise about the processes related to submission of a work project proposal, completion of specific deliverables, and presentation of work that may be subsumed by another’s corporate image or reputation. It’s best to decide in advance of commencing a subcontractor relationship, what you consider proprietary, whether you will use your own templates or designs for evaluation processes and reports, and how your work will enhance the value of the deliverables to be met in concert with the primary contractor. Inherent in subcontracted work is the greater amount of time needed for a coordinated response to conditions that develop and may be unforeseen —either by the primary contractor or the client — after project initiation. When you are not the primary contact to the client, you’ll rely on the primary contractor’s communication skills, availability, and affability to best represent their and your interests.

Hot Tips: Subcontract when you and the primary contractor have agreed to work scope, timelines, and individual responsibilities for developing, proofing, and finalizing deliverables. Discuss each other’s understanding of client expectations. Be clear of your expectations of work product format(s), deadlines that precede final products to the client, and service payment amounts.

Maintain written agreements, outline agreed-upon tasks in a letter of agreement or mini-contract.

Working solo or as a subcontractor calls for trusting yourself and others. Acknowledge how well you can do so, in what instances, and proceed accordingly.

Rad Resource: For tax filing purposes in the U.S., acquaint yourself with tax form 1099-MISC applicable to independent consultants/subcontractors.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello, I am Matt Feldmann, the principal researcher and owner of Goshen Education Consulting, Inc. (http://www.goshenedu.com).  My company focuses on educational evaluation and data support for clients in Southern Illinois. As a company of one I have to do a lot of balancing (aka “hat wearing”) to support the many activities that go with coordinating my small business.

Lessons Learned: There are three broad project categories you need to balance: (1) Development, (2) Management, and (3) Administration.

  • Project development is the identification of potential evaluation projects. These activities may include marketing your efforts to potential clients, assistance with writing proposals, and other general networking activities. If you don’t have new work, you don’t have a business.
  • Project management concerns the coordination of your current funded projects which includes contract development, billing, and meeting with clients to coordinate activity and discuss evaluation results. If you don’t get paid and coordinate relationships with your current clients you will not be sustainable.
  • Project administration is the conduct of your evaluation that may include data collection, organization, editing, and reporting. This is often seen as the primary activity for evaluators, but it can’t be the only activity if you want to continue as an independent consultant.

Hot Tip: You can’t spend all of your time on project administration and expect to keep an independent consulting business going. Like the often used three-legged stool analogy, you must be prepared to spend time in each of the project activities: development, and management, in addition to administration.

Hot Tip: Every project you work on is an opportunity to develop a new project. Gail Barrington suggests in her Consulting Start-Up and Management book that it is likely that your next project will come from a current client. Further, excellent performance on your current project may result in a recommendation to a new client.

Hot Tip: Go see your clients. The physical act of meeting with your client promotes trust and goodwill. This opportunity to develop your relationship may result in unexpected additional work.

Rad Resources: The following are two excellent books that I have used extensively in support of my balancing act:

Consulting Start-Up and Management (http://www.barringtonresearchgrp.com/consulting-start-up-and-management.html) by Gail Barrington outlines a great guide for how to develop an evaluation or applied research independent practice.

Getting Started in Consulting (http://summitconsulting.com/store/getting-started-info.php) by Alan Weiss is a great general book about how to initiate a consulting practice.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello! I’m Carlisle Levine, an independent evaluator specializing in organizational and advocacy evaluation, evaluation systems and evaluation capacity building. Having worked for international non-governmental organizations and the U.S. government, I am relatively new to consulting. One of my biggest concerns in making the shift was finding community.

Lessons Learned: The Importance of Community

Very quickly as an independent evaluator, I was reminded of the value of community.

  • I believe I produce my best work when I can think it through with respected colleagues.
  • I need colleagues when my projects ask for skills, experience and access beyond my own, or when I have more work than I can do alone.
  • Colleagues can also connect me to new projects.

In my experience, building community is a time investment. The rewards are undertaking bigger projects, benefiting from peer learning, and producing more creative and higher quality work.

Hot Tip: Finding Community

To establish community, I have used various strategies:

  • Reaching out to former colleagues and their colleagues;
  • Relying on AEA links and also on my local affiliate; and
  • Remaining active in professional networks relevant to my work.

Rad Resources: For some projects, I have partnered with evaluators working in countries where a project has taken place. To identify potential teammates, in addition to tapping personal networks, I have used resources such as the MandENews listserv and the website for the International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE), which provides contact information for national and regional evaluation associations.

Lessons Learned: Building Collaborative Working Relationships

I have found that most critical to successful collaboration is trust, based on shared values and similar commitments to producing quality work in a timely fashion. It requires sensitivity to time availability and financial needs. It is guided by clear scopes of work and reinforced by good communication. Agreeing to no surprises proves to be a helpful principle.

Hot Tips: There are a number of ways I have developed collaborative working relationships.

  • I start with a conversation about work experience, interests and styles.
  • Colleagues and I have reviewed each other’s work and provided input to questions raised.
  • With some colleagues, I have undertaken small projects that can test our collaborative relationship. These can be good foundations for future work together. If not, much has been learned and little lost.
  • With all collaborative relationships, and especially with new ones, I budget ample time for communication to ensure that we remain on the same page.

Rad Resource: Stephen Maack and Jan Upton wrote a helpful article, Collaborative relationships in evaluation consulting. My experience, described above, echoed their findings.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi there! My name is Gail Barrington from the Barrington Research Group, Inc. I’m an independent evaluation consultant and I have a perspective to share with you. The first time I attended an AEA conference, I had one burning question in mind. Should I take the risk and go out on my own? I attended a session by Mike Hendricks, Deb Bonnet and Tara Knott and came away inspired. I thought, if they can do it, so can I!

At that time a very small group of about eight to ten people showed up at our annual TIG meetings. You may be surprised to know that many of those individuals are still around today and after more than 25 years, I’m still at it too.

Our TIG now has over 1500 members. It offers an informative quarterly newsletter, a well-used listserv, several client-related tools, a lively annual meeting and dinner, and many informative presentations and panels at each year’s conference. What has not changed is that sense of community and respect that TIG members share, or that desire to support, mentor, and help each other, or that boundless, crazy enthusiasm for independent practice that keeps us all going.

Lessons Learned — What is it about independent consulting that makes it so addictive?

There are risks—busy years and dry years, good clients and bad clients, dream projects and horror stories. And then there are the business management issues, marketing challenges, liabilities, responsibilities, headaches. It’s hard to plan with all this uncertainty going on.

At the same time, the benefits are irresistible. Nothing beats the sense of exhilaration you get when you finally realize you’re making it on your own, or when you client calls back for another project, or when you finally receive that check you’ve been waiting for. Call it an adrenaline rush if you like, independent consulting gets into your system and will not let you go.

Rad Resources: Independent consulting is fraught with challenges as well as learning opportunities. Building community, project management, working solo compared with sub-contracting, handling thorny data ownership issues, and business development are some of the most critical topics for an independent consultant to learn. This week’s posts will feature a wealth of information on exactly those, so please stay tuned!

For even more information on important consulting topics, check out my blog at Barrington Research Group.

Get Involved: And while you’re at it, why not join the Independent Consulting TIG. You’ll be glad you did.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello, my name is David Merves and I work for Evergreen Evaluation & Consulting, Inc. (EEC) in Jericho, Vermont.

What is a MARKET NICHE? Black’s Law Dictionary defines it as “a small, profitable market segment suitable for focused marketer attention.” Entrepreneur magazine says, “Niche marketing can be an extremely cost-effective method that targets carefully pinpointed market segments.” At EEC we viewed niche markets as an opportunity to expand and refocus our business, while competing against the scale economies that larger competitors are able to achieve.

This refocusing, rebranding, took the form of a name change and corporate structure. EEC was originally formed as Evergreen Educational Consulting, LLC and based upon our goals and with advice from our attorneys, accountants and mentors we shifted to a C Corp as Evergreen Evaluation and Consulting, Inc. The organizational realignment was linked to our objectives, resources, and capacities.  We spent a year discussing the culture of our business, our attributes, our strategies for achieving our goals and preparing our business plan, which included marketing.

Lesson Learned: It was imperative that we assessed the company’s strengths and weaknesses and aligned our marketing strategies to planned outcomes. We are a small company and our brand is our face to the world.  It is the perception of our values by our customers and potential customers that counts. Our brand is the principles woven into the fabric of our company. Our brand is not a flashy web site or logo. It is our promise and commitment.

Dawn Thilmany, Ph.D. at Colorado State University has written that there are five stages to fully addressing a niche opportunity:

  • Strategic Planning
  • Define Mission and Objectives
  • Strategies and Action
  • Monitoring Key Projects/Objectives
  • Organizational Realignment

After EEC’s rebranding experience we would suggest the following:

  • Think analytically
  • Don’t try to appeal to everyone
  • Be honest with yourself
  • Learn the lingo of your niche
  • Commit 100%
  • You will make mistakes; move on

Hot Tip: As you build your business, be mindful of revenue streams, contractual cycles and invoicing patterns. You don’t want your niche to be so narrow as to have an unexpected event, say Sequestration, impacting the overall viability of your company.  Try to layer your contracts so that you are replacing 20 – 30% of your revenue each year and not having to scramble to replace 75%. When negotiating your invoice schedule consider your cash flow needs. Can your business operate on quarterly payments or do monthly invoices make more sense?

Rad Resources:

Pinterest: Branding and Design books

My favorite, The Brand Called You by Peter Montoya with Tim Vandehey with a forward by Al Ries.

Clipped from http://www.evergreenevaluation.net/index.php

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Promoting Your Consultancy Week with information on marketing and branding. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our colleagues who own evaluation businesses. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi there! My name is Gail Barrington and I’ve been an independent evaluator for over 25 years. It seems to me that three factors help determine the size of your consultancy:

  1. Your Vision—what do you see when you dream of yourself as an independent consultant? Are you on your own, working closely with clients on a few interesting projects but able to retreat to your own private world to get your thinking done? Or do you see yourself working with a couple of trusted colleagues whose skills complement your own, together making a well-oiled team? Or are you embedded in a dynamic organization with several layers of staff and yourself as leader and CEO? The vision that resonates for you will help decide your ideal firm size.
  2. Your Skills—what are special skills you are known for? What did you like best in school? What have you received great feedback about on the job? Is it your technical expertise, knowledge of a specific sector, problem solving ability, project management skills, interaction with clients, or something else? Whatever these skills are, they should be the focus of your marketing efforts.
  3. Your Market—based on the networking and competitive intelligence you have conducted, what organizations are hiring evaluators? In what capacities? What are the social changes, political decisions, and demographic trends that are shaping your community? Who is feeling pressure to demonstrate accountability? Where are your colleagues working these days? Answers to questions like these will help you identify market opportunities as they shift over time.

Of the many lessons I have learned, these three stand out:

Lessons Learned:

  • Nothing is cast in stone. Consultants change their business name, size, and structure all the time. Changes to their vision, preferred skill set, or market cause them to reassess and reconfigure. They move in and out of partnerships, change from sole proprietorship to LLC , and reorganize from corporation to non-profit corporation. Don’t feel that the decision you make now will limit your options later.
  • Once a consultant, always a consultant. Consulting is addictive. I have known many consultants who threw in the towel and returned to “a regular job.” Lack of a reliable income is usually the main reason.  Funnily enough, a year or two later, they are back at consulting again having found themselves unhappy working for someone else. Just a warning!
  • Your business skills are transferrable. If you can run a consulting business, you can run any business. Even when you retire, you may find those small business and entrepreneurial skills surfacing again in unexpected ways. Many people can benefit from the skills you now take for granted and you may find that you never stop using them.
Clipped from http://www.barringtonresearchgrp.com/

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Promoting Your Consultancy Week with information on marketing and branding. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our colleagues who own evaluation businesses. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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