AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | e-learning

Isidro Maya Jariego

I’m Isidro Maya Jariego, Associate Professor, Social Psychology Department of the Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). I’m participating in a project to promote the adoption of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) for improving the quality of education of universities in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Palestine. OpenMed is an international cooperation project co-funded by the Erasmus+ Capacity Building in Higher Education programme of the European Union.

Throughout project implementation, we observed that higher education institutions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region face problems of massification, and occasionally cover large areas or rural extents of difficult accessibility. Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) and digital media allow facing these types of difficulties; at the same time, they offer opportunities for educational innovation.

This allowed us to observe the adjustment and incorporation of the project into four different national contexts.

Lessons Learned:

The degree of internationalization of the university is a good indicator of readiness to adopt OER and OEP. Universities that are bicultural, use a second language in teaching, have bilateral agreements with other universities outside the country, have a culturally diverse teaching staff or receive and send students in academic exchanges, tend to be more receptive to the incorporation of open educational resources.

During implementation of the OpenMed project we realized that participating universities and teachers were characterized by having a more international character than other local universities and teachers. Internationalization indirectly reports about readiness to adopt OER. It seems to be a self-reinforcing process: international experiences predispose for the incorporation of OEP and the incorporation of OEP contributes to the university’s internationalization.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320024153_Localising_Open_Educational_Resources_and_Massive_Open_Online_Courses

Hot Tip: Focus on organizational dynamics and local relevance. In southern Mediterranean countries there is usually a greater distance to the authority of the teacher, and the cohesion and harmony of the group have greater weight than the individual interests, in comparison with Europe and North America. However, beyond these cultural peculiarities, we have learned that organizational factors are key. Institutional constraints in each university (e.g, textbook use policies and incentives) are determinants of the likelihood of content reuse. On the other hand, in the reuse of content it is also opportune to incorporate locally relevant examples connected to local needs.

Hot Tip: Prevent exclusion of more local universities. Local universities that are less internationally connected, run the risk of being excluded from the processes of educational innovation and the incorporation of open education practices. These are universities somewhat disconnected from the elite of higher education institutions in the country. It is a high-risk group in terms of accessibility to quality education, which requires specific actions.

Rad Resources:

The OpenMed project has produced useful resources for planning to implement or evaluate a MENA region program:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

· ·

We’re Chris Lovato, Professor in the School of Population & Public Health at the University of British Columbia, and Kylie Hutchinson, independent consultant and author of A Short Primer on Innovative Evaluation Reporting.

To date, most evaluation capacity-building has tended to focus on program-level managers and staff, ignoring the key role that senior leaders also play in using evaluation for making better decisions. However, informed decision-making and evidence-informed practice depends on senior decision-makers having a full understanding and appreciation of evaluation.  Managers are constantly looking for ways to work smarter and more effectively in their leadership role, but management has never been more complex and challenging. We believe that managers who are savvy users of evaluation are more likely to be more effective leaders and decision-makers. But it’s a significant challenge to capture the attention of these extremely busy individuals.

Rad Resource: Evaluation for Leaders is an innovative and interactive mobile learning course that managers can access on their laptop, tablet, or phone, anywhere and anytime, free of charge. The course is designed to quickly increase leaders’ understanding of evaluation through seven stand-alone units each taking five to ten minutes to complete. Each unit contains practical information and just-in-time tips for how to use evaluation to do things differently. The intent of the course is not to teach managers how to do evaluation, but rather how to better use evaluation in their day-to-day decision making and organization overall. At the end of the course managers have a greater appreciation for how they can better support evaluation in their organization so it can better support them.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

·

My name is Matt Galen. I’m a PhD student in Program Evaluation and Applied Research Methods at Claremont Graduate University, and I’m going to give you a few practical guidelines for putting on an “Open Conference.” First, a brief bit of background about how I became interested in the idea of open conferences. Over the past couple of years, in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation, UNICEF, and other organizations, I have coordinated webinars and developed content for the free international evaluation e-learning program that has been discussed elsewhere in AEA365. More information about the e-learning program can be found here.

Galen 1E-learning programs are typically designed for an entirely online or virtual audience. In contrast, Open Conferences are designed to broadcast a live conference event to a virtual audience. The energy of a live conference event, combined with the mixture of in-person and virtual participants, creates a unique dynamic that can either go extremely well, or terribly wrong. Having facilitated open conferences for the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) conference, Claremont Graduate University’s Professional Development Workshops, and several other events, I can proudly say that it is possible to bring the chances of a “terribly wrong” scenario down to about zero. Here are some lessons I have learned along the way – I hope that others find them useful guidelines for facilitating open evaluation conferences in the future.

Lesson Learned: Why have an open conference: There are two primary purposes for webcasting conference sessions and developing evaluation e-learning programs:

(1)   To increase access to the latest thinking in program and policy evaluation for people who are not able to attend (due to lack of funds, travel time, disability, etc.)

(2)   To expand the “brand visibility” of a conference

(3)   To expand and enhance global communities and networks of professional evaluators

Galen 2Hot Tip: What you will need to put on a successful open conference:

(1)   A carefully developed plan for which conference sessions you will be broadcasting

(2)   Tools

  1. Laptop(s) – preferably powerful
  2. Webcam(s) – preferably high resolution (720p and 1080p are the current standard)
  3. Microphone(s) – preferably USB-input, preferably with voice-tracking capabilities. This is the most important tool, as audio can make or break an online experience
  4. Web conferencing software – many competitors in this arena, and the jury is still out on a clear winner

(3)   Other

  1. Web access – either via a LAN cable or wireless network
  2. Trained webcasters
  3. An eager audience – it is very important to effectively market an open conference via multiple channels (social networks, email listservs, etc.).

Hot Tip: integrating the online audience:

(1)   Remind presenters ahead of time to ask questions of the online audience

(2)   Ask live audience members to speak loudly and clearly when asking questions or making comments

(3)   For large audiences, can make use of automated audience question moderation tools like this.

Interested in learning more, or considering putting on an open conference but don’t know where to start? Want to talk about ideas related to open conferences? I love a good chat. Please leave a note in the comments or send me an email at matthew.galen@cgu.edu.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

·

Archives

To top