AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

TAG | cultural competence

Hello from two scholars and two coasts! We are Mike Osiemo Mwirigi, MS, and Glen Acheampong, MPP. During our GEDI program year, we learned that evaluators and stakeholders are increasing their use of visuals to present data. Data visualization pioneers in evaluation have pointed out that a good visual can make evaluation results more user friendly. Effective visuals capture people’s attention, substitute for text and help reduce the lethargy of reading long reports. Last, they can tell a more memorable story.

We noticed that when talking about data visualization, cultural competency rarely comes up. Cultural competency in evaluation is the ability to engage with diverse stakeholders to “include cultural and contextual dimensions important to the evaluation” (American Evaluation Association, 2011). Data visuals can be interpreted differently based on cultural differences and, as a result, we interpret and react differently to the same stimulus.

The documentary West and East, Cultural Differences discusses how Easterners (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) and Westerners (Americans and Europeans) are tuned to differently interpret visual information. The documentary shared the following:

Hot Tip 1: Begin with a plan.

Data visualization can lose the intricacies of the story its telling. Further, some data visuals are complex and hard to interpret without an explanation. Evaluators should consider data visualization from the onset of the evaluation design to navigate exactly what the image should convey.

Hot Tip 2: Check and reflect stakeholders’ interpretations of data visuals.  

When interpreting data visualization guidelines or rules of thumb we must note that these are not universal; what works for one population might be counterproductive for another. This is true for constructed meanings around colors, shape, and symbols. Instead, explore what stakeholders need and can digest.

Rad Resources:

American Evaluation Association. (2011). American Evaluation Association Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation. Fairhaven, MA. Retrieved from www.eval.org.

EBS. (2012, December 05). West and East, Cultural Differences. Retrieved July 06, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoDtoB9Abck&index=302&list=LLaTQQZHp4uDV7ubqPoaq4NQ

Emery, A. K., & Evergreen, S. (2014). Data Visualization Checklist. http://stephanieevergreen.com/dataviz-checklist/

Links to West and East, Cultural Differences

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoDtoB9Abck&index=302&list=LLaTQQZHp4uDV7ubqPoaq4NQ and

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=709jjq8qk0k&t=4s

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI  Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Greetings! I’m Vidhya Shanker, a doctoral candidate in Evaluation Studies at the University of Minnesota. Writing during Thanksgiving week, from the birthplace of the American Indian Movement—surrounded by the largest urban Native and largest refugee communities–as the daughter of immigrants from a colonized country, I offer this exploration of culture to everyone committed to struggles for self-determination. Because I represent the settler in this colonial state, I frame it in terms of colonization, not indigeneity.

Since AEA members approved the Statement on Cultural Competence in 2011, many efforts demonstrate evaluators’ interest in cultural competence. This led me to ask:

  • When do evaluators draw from culture in ways that strengthen colonized groups’ enactment of self-determination?
  • When do evaluators deploy culture in ways that reinforce colonial dynamics?

Lesson Learned: Culture is slippery.

We often call differences between colonized groups and institutions built by/ for dominant groups “cultural.” This suggests that a difference in culture is the problem, when the problem is actually a difference in power. Dominant groups have long learned about colonized groups’ cultures to advance the colonizing project. This led me to ask:

  • Is the competency that evaluators need really cultural? Or is it critical—the competency to analyze the exercise of power?

Lesson Learned: Agency matters.

Practicing one’s culture under conditions of cultural imperialism represents a decolonizing act. When dominant groups take the cultural practices of colonized groups, culture loses its emancipatory power. Evaluators from dominant groups who incorporate decontextualized elements of colonized groups’ cultures into their evaluation practice risk engaging in cultural appropriation and reproducing the colonial relationship between the knower and the known.

For example, interdependence is sometimes fetishized as part of colonized groups’ “culture” that can be incorporated into otherwise conventional evaluations to demonstrate cultural competence. But interdependence is more than cultural: It is legal, political, economic, social, environmental, and spiritual. Understanding and treating people and nature as relatives rather than resources in all these realms would mean the demise of the settler colony in which we live.

Hot Tip:

Every evaluator can reflect on our motivations for seeking–and the impact of exercising–cultural competence. Depending on our social location, are we displacing colonized groups’ knowledge and agency?

Culture is not a static “thing” attached to people. Colonized groups have survived by individually and collectively developing the ability to change our ways of speaking, behaving, thinking, depending on the context, while maintaining ties to our communities and histories.

This ability to respond interculturally has become necessary in institutions that are led and evaluated by an increasingly professionalized class who often shares no frame of reference with participants. Institutions have long asked individuals who can respond interculturally to facilitate or defuse situations that they failed to anticipate without necessarily changing institutionalized dynamics of dominance. The ability is now considered worth learning among individuals from dominant groups. Like culture, though, cultural competence risks becoming commodified when sought by dominant groups pursuing the professional rewards that certification ushers in.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE)  TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi, my name is Libby Smith, I am an evaluator at the Applied Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Stout and program co-chair for the LGBT Issues TIG. When I first took on the task of introducing LGBTQ Week on this blog, I considered that the most common conversations I have about cultural competence in evaluation are related to race and ethnicity.  What about LGBT cultural competence? It rarely comes up specifically in my own work, but I am regularly asked to consult with others on how to ask about gender/sex/sexual orientation in evaluation work (we’ll address this later this week!).

This leaves me with the feeling that people often think their work is done once they have asked these questions in a “correct” way. Obviously, it goes deeper than that, but how are we as evaluators expanding our cultural competence around LGBT issues? And this applies to LGBT evaluators as well (again, we will address this later in the week).

Rad Resources:

If you aren’t familiar with the AEA’s Statement on Cultural Competence, this is a wonderful place to start. The statement is intended to proactively assert the responsibility that we, as evaluators, should address the needs of culturally diverse populations in our work.

The statement doesn’t tell us how to achieve that goal though. We must take it upon ourselves to be open, self-aware, culturally humble, and intentional about educating ourselves.

The health care field has done exceptional work in developing tools to train providers in addressing the unique needs of LGBT individuals in both physical and mental health. While not directly applicable to most evaluation work, we can leverage these resources to expand our understanding of the many ways in which LGBT populations present diverse perspectives.

This week, evaluators from our TIG will share their strategies, experiences, and insights gained from being evaluators with a unique perspective. We will address gender, sexual orientation, and perspective-taking and hopefully change some perspectives in the process!

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating LGBT TIG Week with our colleagues in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Issues Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our LGBT TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

My name is Tessie Catsambas and I am Chair of the AEA International Working Group. My contribution to this Memorial Day series is to call attention to the demise of the designation “Third World.” The term Third World arose in the Cold War to refer to the group of developing nations mostly in Asia and Africa with a colonialist past, which were not aligned either with the United States (the first world) nor with the Communist Block (the second world). Third World referred to underdeveloped nations, especially those with widespread poverty. The world is now more varied economically and politically: with globalization, we have seen a growing number of middle-income countries, especially in Asia, and the rise of the BRIC countries, an acronym that refers to the countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China, seen as emerging economics. The term Third World implied political divisions and hierarchy that are misleading and irrelevant in the current political and economic state of the world. We now speak about the “Global South,” “developing countries,” and “less developed countries.”

Hot Tip: Ask people in different places in the world how they prefer to be identified. Language matters. Being culturally sensitive and responsive includes being attentive to language.

Rad Resource: American Evaluation Association Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation

Hot Tip: Language is dynamic. Terms that have been appropriate at one time become dated, even offensive at other times.

Rad Resource: If You Shouldn’t Call It The Third World, What Should You Call It?

National Public Radio series Goats and Soda: Life in a Changing World

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Memorial Week in Evaluation. The contributions this week are remembrances of evaluation concepts, terms, or approaches. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

We are both AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellows this year with specialization in two related disciplines. The first author, Cirecie West-Olatunji is a counselor educator at Xavier University of Louisiana and Chandra Story is a faculty member in Health Education and Promotion/Pubic Health at Oklahoma State University. As we conclude our year long fellowship with AEA, we have gravitated to discussions on culturally responsive program evaluation. Most salient in our discussions have been topics focusing on the role of the evaluator in minimizing hegemony in evaluation design, data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

For the past several decades scholars have advanced knowledge about the hidden values implicit in program evaluation design and interpretation. In a 2014 report, the Centers for Disease Control stated that cultural values can influence community members’ theory of change processes (i.e., their perceptions and associated behaviors related to the issues of concern). Such cultural myopia can also influence policymakers’ decisions affecting the community and delivery of services by practitioners. Thus, culturally skewed perspectives can have long-lasting effects on marginalized individuals, families, and communities. In considering ways to increase self-awareness of intellectual colonization and bias among evaluators, we have devised a list of three hot tips that can be used by practicing evaluators that can move us from cultural destructiveness to cultural proficiency on the cultural competence continuum.

Hot Tips:

#1: Increase Self-awareness

Start with a self-inventory in which you reflect on your own values that serve to guide your evaluation practices. Also, consider how these values may be in conflict with the community you are evaluating as well as how your beliefs may reflect inconsistencies or myths about the community stakeholders. Self-awareness also includes an awareness of relative privilege.

#2: Increase Community Knowledge

After reflecting on how your values are embedded in your evaluation practices, take the time to learn more about the history, strengths, and worldviews of the community with whom you are developing the evaluation plan (The Colorado Trust,  2007). Read archival information or engage in meaningful dialogue with community representatives. In addition, it may be helpful to access a cultural broker– one who can mediate between cultures.

#3: Increase Culturally Responsive Evaluation Skills

Actively enhance your culturally responsive evaluation competence by participating in professional development trainings (online webinars or local/national conference presentations). Additionally, read journal articles, books, and digital resources available on the web.

As a guiding principle, it is important that we demonstrate cultural sensitivity in which empathy, trust, and respect are highlighted in our actions. Only then can we increase our credibility in seeking truths about program effectiveness in diverse settings.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Throughout the course of our GEDI experience, we have been immersed in cultural competence and culturally responsive evaluation. We learned the fundamentals of cultural competence in seminars at Claremont Graduate University and explored the prevalence of culturally responsive evaluation topics at AEA’s annual meeting. The unique opportunity of being able to observe the work of teams at our intern sites provided an especially useful experience of what it is like to not only practice culturally responsive evaluation, but also how to work within settings that are new to evaluation practice. While the knowledge we gained through our GEDI trainings was beneficial in preparing us for our sites, our experiences working within groups that were not accustomed to evaluation, or culturally responsive evaluation more specifically, gave us a unique opportunity to practice our newly acquired knowledge.

Lessons Learned from our GEDI Site Experiences:

Working on a team can be challenging when balancing multiple personalities and working styles to reach a common goal or deliverable. This can be particularly challenging when working on an evaluation project because often the teams include members external to your organization (clients, external partners, beneficiaries). Cultural competence, as we have observed, emanates from clear communication among evaluation team members and working within existing organizational structures to incorporate culturally competent evaluation practice. Some ways that the teams we have observed have navigated cultural competence were:

  • Embedded culturally responsive practices within the team’s regular protocol – Evaluation teams that work with many external clients tend to have routine processes for carrying out their scope of work from start to finish. When culturally responsive practices are embedded into these routines, it makes them necessary for all members of the team to consider and complete. It also helps to guarantee that even those who might not be coming to the table with a background in cultural competence can learn and become more familiar with its use.
  • For groups or organizations working with clients who are unfamiliar with evaluation practice – Evaluation can be a scary word to many individuals and organizations. An awareness of an organization’s comfort with and knowledge of evaluation is necessary prior to implementing an evaluation plan. This requires that evaluators practice culturally competent evaluation not only for projects as they pertain to their clients, but also interpersonally when working internally or externally as an evaluator.

Rad Resource:

An excellent resource for those looking for best practices for culturally competent evaluation work comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Practical Strategies for Culturally Competent Evaluation. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2014.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s GEDI Program and its interns. For more information on GEDI, see their webpage here: http://www.eval.org/GEDI Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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This is part of a two-week series honoring our living evaluation pioneers in conjunction with Labor Day in the USA (September 5).

¡Saludos! Greetings! I am Lisa Aponte-Soto, National Program Deputy Director of RWJF New Connections and Director at Equal Measure, AEA GEDI alumna, and LA RED TIG Chair.

Why I chose to honor this evaluator:

LA RED TIG honors Arthur (Art) E. Hernandez, PhD for his leadership in culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) practices and commitment to diversifying the field.

Art Hernandez was Professor and Dean at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, and Director of the AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) initiative. He has recently transitioned to the University of the Incarnate Word. Art has rooted his career in his native Texas, yet his contributions span across the nation.

His first evaluation experience was with a project for the Texas school district. The program staff viewed him as a researcher and saw no distinction between research and evaluation. Art began expanding his scope of work to different settings. Before long, he became a respected evaluator valued for his bilingual and bicultural lens. However, it wasn’t until he participated in the 2009 MSI cohort that he realized that he was conducting formal evaluation.

Art attributes MSI and similar traineeships for building his evaluation methodology skills. Equally, he accredits his lived experience and his perspective as a Latino as being critical to the quality of evaluation. His ethnic background and CRE training have also influenced his attention to cultural context in the work.

Art refers to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) as an essential technical and quality-driven inherent value for all evaluation practice. And, he applauds AEA for being at the forefront of integrating cultural awareness and responsiveness in the field.

He also acknowledges the importance of AEA’s community of learning fostered through Annual Meetings and Summer Institutes, where he has been able to engage and learn with seasoned evaluators. In turn, Art values giving back to AEA.

A lifetime educator, Art is passionate about mentoring the next generation of culturally responsive evaluators. When invited to lead the MSI Program in 2011, he didn’t hesitate and continues in this role

As an active AEA member, Art is a founding member of LA RED, has served various TIGs, and most notably has contributed to the AEA Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation. Currently, he is working on an evaluation capacity building recipe book for community based organizations.

Rad Resources: Listen to his recent Coffee Break session, The Rise of Latinx presence, perceptions and contributions to notions of CRE and AEA.

Meet Art and other Latinx pioneers at Evaluation 2016, Senior Latin@ Evaluators Reflections on Culturally Responsive Evaluation + Design.

Get Involved: To learn more about evaluation theory and practice by, for and with Latinx communities join LA RED by emailing lared.tig@gmail.com.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Labor Day Week in Evaluation: Honoring Evaluation’s Living Pioneers. The contributions this week are tributes to our living evaluation pioneers who have made important contributions to our field and even positive impacts on our careers as evaluators. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Art Hernandez and I am a Professor and Dean at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi.

I participated in one of the very early yearlong experiences as an AEA MSI Fellow and have served as the Director for several cohorts most recently this past year. I serve and have served as evaluator and teacher of evaluation and am very interested in the processes of cultural responsiveness in practice especially in regards to measurement and assessment.

Lesson Learned: The negative feelings associated with “difference” and the desire to live in a “normal” world with “normal” people often limits our desire to be in contact much less significantly interact with members of different cultural groups. Among other things, the lack of opportunity for significant experience/interaction and the associated feelings results in stereotyping as a means of coping and explaining.

Hot Tip: It is essential to have a significant “relationship” with the people who are involved in the activity being evaluated. This means developing and establishing significant relationships and doing so for its own sake rather than merely as a device to establish “cultural responsiveness”. In order to have any type of meaningful relationship it is important first to have a good sense of self – knowing your values, biases and “world view” and to be open to any differences in those attitudes and beliefs you might encounter in others. Finally, it is imperative that you reserve judgment and risk making “respectful mistakes.” Respectful mistakes are misunderstandings based in honest interest and founded in honest positive regard for the other person(s). 

Rad Resource: Cultural Competence and Community Studies: Concepts and Practices for Cultural Competence

The Stranger’s Eyes describes a community project and the differences in perspectives between the “benefactors” and those who were to benefit. A link provides access to a reflection guide of questions to guide the consideration of the presented case study. Provided by SIL International.

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings. My name is Tiffeny Jimenez and I identify first as a Community Psychologist (CP). I am also an Assistant Professor of the Community Psychology Doctoral program at National Louis University in Chicago. As a CP, I inherently very quickly identify inequalities, injustices, and potential for collaboration where others may be more likely to see only conflict, and from this perspective, evaluation is a particularly salient and necessary skill set. How else might we judge whether social justice is achieved? It is towards this aim that I take on all inquiry and action. This year, I have had the privilege to be one of this year’s MSI Fellows where I have worked with colleagues towards gaining an in-depth interdisciplinary perspective on the state of our understanding Cultural Competence across Social Work, Health Psychology, Sociology, and Community Psychology. I will speak to the contribution of CP to this focus area.

Lesson Learned: The overall CP framework facilitates cultural competency and humility in all acts of professionalism with explicit emphasis on how we think and why we act in certain ways within a socio-cultural ecological context. CP views cultural competency as cross-cultural awareness assuming we all are interdependent and come to the table with diverse cultural lenses that influence action. Cultural competency is a critical consciousness beyond the acquisition of skills; it’s a way of being in every day interactions that allows for a clearer understanding of one’s own personal place in the world, personal biases, and an understanding that multiple perspectives are present at any one time.

The emphasis of CP is on promoting social justice and identifying the root causes of social problems by changing conditions so diverse populations can thrive individually within a shared geography. Much of the literature on cultural competency centers around: providing in-depth localized case examples of how CPs engage as equal peers with others to address individual and social problems from a culturally grounded perspective; describe adaptations of community programming to meet the needs of underserved populations; discuss the importance of using methods that capture historical context and the voices of less dominant perspectives; emphasize the promotion of dynamic processes within community-level systems rather than individual-level outcomes; and advocate understanding the cultural landscape that undergirds the various policies and practices that perpetuate inequalities and maintain the status quo. Main concepts: power, privilege, structural inequality, decolonizing methodologies, organizational culture, critical consciousness, liberation, indigenous psychologies, divergent cultural practices, and ecological sustainability.

Rad Resources: For more information on being culturally competent, see “Community Psychology: Foundations for Practice” (2015). Particularly Chapter 4 by Kien Lee titled “Effecting Social Change in Diverse Contexts”. The Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice also addresses cultural competency in CP practice from a global perspective: http://www.gjcpp.org/en/article.php?issue=16&article=77

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

I am Elizabeth Williams, assistant professor in the Department of Public Health, Health Administration and Health Sciences at Tennessee State University. As a scholar/practitioner of color who teaches emerging public health leaders and works as a health equity researcher, I think a lot about cultural competence and what it means in research and practice. In particular I have been thinking about what it means to be “culturally competent” and whether it is enough to promote health equity.

Lesson Learned: A Note on Competence

The word “competence” suggests the mastery or acquisition of skills and ability to demonstrate what one knows. With diverse populations there are skills researchers can acquire. Competence in qualitative and quantitative methods, like conducting focus groups, surveying, & statistical analysis all lend fairly easily to measurement and evaluation. With these skills, scholars can assess health-related beliefs, behaviors and outcomes in diverse contexts. Yet, acquiring skills to document cultural difference does not guarantee that one will respect, value or appreciate the people or cultural contexts one works in. Being proficient and skilled can make one competent, but not automatically culturally competent.

Cultural Competence: Is it Enough?

Some argue that cultural competence requires more. It requires critical consciousness and cultural humility. Critical consciousness necessitates honesty about power differences between us as professionals, the institutions we represent and our interactions with the people and communities we work. It calls for interrogating how race, class, gender and history intersect making it possible for some groups’ health to be scrutinized (i.e., non-White, poor, LGBTQ, etc.), while others are normalized (i.e., white, heterosexual, etc.). Paired with consciousness, cultural humility is about our self critique as professionals. Cultural humility challenges that we recognize ourselves as cultural beings, whose beliefs are shaped by places and experiences. Acknowledging that culture shapes professional epistemologies in helpful and detrimental ways to practice (and changing what does not work) becomes the basis for understanding how others’ life-ways are also shaped by culture.

This orientation makes it possible for us to realize that while our training equips us with professional skills this does not mean we know everything. Cultural humility should move us from being “experts” to lifelong learners. Those we interact with have as much to teach (perhaps even more) then what we can offer through our service. When cultural humility is our practice then achieving health equity becomes a collaborative exchange with others. That’s when cultural competence really happens.

Rad Resources: Check out Tervalon and Murray-Garcia’s article Cultural humility versus cultural competence: A critical distinction in defining physician training outcomes in multicultural education in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved (1998)

Kumagai and Lypson’s article Beyond Cultural Competence: Critical Consciousness, Social Justice and Multicultural Education (2009)

The American Evaluation Association is AEA Minority Serving Institution (MSI) Fellowship Experience week. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from AEA’s MSI Fellows. For more information on the MSI fellowship, see this webpage: http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=230 Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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