AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

Hello Evaluation Learners! I’m Sheila B. Robinson, aea365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor. Today, I’m writing about AEA’s Summer Evaluation Institute, a perennial fabulous learning opportunity. Anyone who knows me knows that I love learning and meeting with evaluation colleagues, and this is the perfect opportunity for both.

Registration is now open for the 2018 AEA Summer Evaluation Institute – June 17 – June 20 in Atlanta, GA. Presenters will be ready with 34 high quality courses on a wide variety of topics. Please visit the site for complete descriptions of each workshop.

Hot Tip: If you attend, plan on showing up for the plenary sessions. This year features what is sure to be an engaging and dynamic keynote by Kylie Hutchinson of Community Solutions Planning and Evaluation – Effective Evaluation Reporting: Making Your Key Messages Sticky. Kylie’s book, A Short Primer on Innovative Evaluation Reporting is a wonderful compilation of creative ideas for non-traditional evaluation reporting.

Rad Resources: 

The 2018 Summer Evaluation institute offers two full day pre-institute workshops:

  1. An Interactive and Case-Centered Primer on Evaluation Approaches with Bianca Montrosse-Moorhead from the University of Connecticut:

All evaluation rests on an evaluation approach (i.e., theory or model). Sometimes this approach is explicit and sometimes it is implicit. Either way, evaluation approaches guide the reasoning for doing an evaluation, how it will be done, who will be involved and how, and what will be done with results and by whom. This interactive, case-centered workshop covers historical and contemporary evaluation approaches in diverse national and international contexts. Institute course offerings include:

2. Introduction to Evaluation with Thomas Chapel from the Centers for Disease Control

This workshop will provide an overview of program evaluation for Institute participants with some, but not extensive, prior background in program evaluation. The foundations of this workshop will be organized around the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) six-step Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health as well as the four sets of evaluation standards from the Joint Commission on Evaluation Standards.

Hot Tip: Check out the other 32 half-day workshops. You can choose up to 5 courses during the institute!

Hot Tip: Can’t wait to get your evaluation learning on? Act fast to register for the 2018 AEA Summer Evaluation Institute and take advantage of early bird prices (until May 24)! Courses do fill up!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, Keiko Kuji-Shikatani (C.E., CES representative for EvalGender+) and Hur Hassnain  (Pakistan Evaluation Association; Impact, Results and Learning Manager, Y Care International) here to share our thoughts on how to engage and collectively think about better evaluating learning and social accountability in FCV (fragility, conflict and violence).

The World Bank estimates that by 2030, the share of global poor living in FCV is projected to reach 46%. According to the OECD, ‘fragile states’ are most at risk of not achieving the sustainable development goals.

Hot Tips and Rad Resources:

stacked stones

Here are seven Hot Tips and Rad Resources to consider wh

en evaluating in FCV:

1-Context.  Take context as a starting point and invest in FCV analysis to understand sources of tension and cohesion.

2-Be conflict-sensitive, whilst working in FCV we need to realise that no one is neutral. Evaluations should explain the interactions between context and the intervention.

3-Good monitoring precedes good evaluations. Traditional periodic evaluations are unrealistic when evaluators struggle to have access to the targeted people. Monitoring supports adaptive programming by informing decision makers faster, resulting in timely project fixes.

4-Engaging local communities where access is restricted, in the M&E processes to make them agents of change. This requires a well-planned and thoughtful process to ensure their safe and meaningful involvement.

5-Third Party Monitoring. TPM is a risk-management to

 

ol intended to provide evidence in inaccessible areas, it also presents some ethical and technical limitations. The Secure Access in Volatile Environments program suggests TPM works best when used as a last resort.

6-Using information and communication technologies where remote programming is needed, ICTs offer creative solutions to compensate face-to-face interaction, making evaluations an agile tool for adaptive-management; new ethical challenges and the new kinds of risks that digital data brings need to be mitigated. See Oxfam’s Mobile Survey Toolkit for tools and providers.

7-Is the evaluation worth the cost when money could otherwise be used to relieve human suffering? Think twice if the context is fluid, continuously changing and the target population is on the move. Cost is justified only if the findings have the capability and potential to lead to program improvements andgenerate learning without compromising the security of the affected population, people delivering aid or collecting data.  Depending on the context you can choose from a spectrum of options including more informal reflective learning exercises (e.g., After Action Reviews/Real-Time Evaluations) and use user-friendly communications including social media posts with the evaluation participants.

A greater drive for meaningful conflict-sensitive evaluations that investigates the causes of FCV, instead of ‘fig leaf’, evaluations would contribute to better outcomes and new policies to provide more flexible and faster support for those whose lives are torn apart by war and conflict.

Interested in learning more? Reach out to the International Development Evaluation Association who with its partners established a Thematic Interest Group on Evaluation in fragility, conflict and violence (EvalFCV).

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello in different languages

I’m Jessie Tannenbaum, Advisor in the Research, Evaluation, and Learning Office at the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative*, here to share tips and ideas for conducting evaluation work in foreign languages.

First Things First: Budget

Having a good interpreter is as important as having a good evaluator, and interpretation (verbal) and translation (written) are expensive. Make sure your evaluation is budgeted at local market rates for interpreters (you may need 2, depending on the length of meetings) and translators, allow for interpreter overtime and translation rush fees, and remember to budget for interpretation equipment. Even if you’re bilingual, unless your entire evaluation team will be working entirely in the foreign language, you’ll probably need some documents translated (usually charged per word in the target language).

McDonald's sign

Define Your Terms: Native Speaker =/= Technical Fluency

Unless you are conducting an evaluation on a subject in which you have technical training, in your native language and your native country, you need to sit down with a local expert on the evaluation subject and define commonly-used terms. Even the same term in the same language may have different meanings in different countries. If you’re working with an interpreter, make sure they understand English technical terms you use and how they relate to technical terms in their own language. If you’re a bilingual evaluator, review common technical terms used in that country or make sure you’re accompanied by a technical expert who can help you avoid confusion.

Hot Tip: Treat interpreters as part of your evaluation team. Orient them to your research process and interview/focus group techniques, and debrief afterwards.

Why use a bilingual evaluator? (Not just because it’s cheaper.)

Cultural knowledge is as important as subject-matter expertise. Even working with the best interpreter, evaluators who don’t speak the language of people participating in their evaluation will inevitably miss some cultural context. In most cases, this will cause minor confusion that’s easily smoothed over, but sometimes, it could throw the evaluation completely off course. It’s important to work with someone who understands the community where the evaluation will take place to determine whether it’s appropriate to work through an interpreter, or whether a bilingual evaluator is needed.

Writing for Translation

Chances are, if you’re working for a US-based organization, you’ll write surveys, interview protocols, and your evaluation report in English and have them translated. The way you write in English can affect the quality of the translation.  Translation company Lionbridge has great tips on writing for translation. Write short, clear sentences, avoid humor and idioms, and use the active voice.  Check out Federal plain language guidelines for tips on writing concisely and clearly.

Rad Resource: Poor survey translations can distort findings, and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan has published must-read guidelines on translating surveys. Best practices include planning translation as part of study design, using a team translation approach, and assessing the translation prior to pre-testing.

*Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA ROLI.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hello, I am Laura Gagliardone. For about twelve years, I have worked for the UN System and NGOs as Program Development and Evaluation, and Communications Specialist; and galvanized the international community on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Relevance: Among all Global Goals, there is one – Goal 5: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment – which we all are called to prioritize as we need women’s support to implement the SDGs by 2030.

Hot Tip: Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable world. When women and girls are provided with equal access to education, health care, decent work, and representation in political and economic decision-making processes, they become empowered and happier colleagues, partners, mothers, sisters, and daughters.

Hot Tip: Question yourself on how women live their life and spend their time daily. Conduct research and analyze Time Use Surveys (TUSs): irregular national surveys conducted to collect information about how people use their time. Find out the areas of women’s employment and evidence on how including them in the labor market would benefit the economy. Prepare recommendations focusing on: paid and unpaid work, program design, policy development, and psychological factors for mentality and behavior changes.

Lessons Learned: In 2015, I have conducted a research and prepared a study on the ‘Women’s Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia, and China’ since time is a direct source of utility, and how people spend it impacts economic growth, gender equality, and sustainable development. Through TUSs, the report presents data which can be utilized as basis for understanding, measuring and monitoring the society over which policies can be formulated, assessed, and modified. In India, the findings show that women’s work is often scattered, sporadic, and poorly diversified, and they spend long hours on unpaid work. Therefore it is recommendable to (1) reduce and redistribute unpaid work by providing infrastructures and services; (2) design programs to improve women’s skills and enable them to access better jobs and enter new sectors as wage earners and entrepreneurs; and (3) design policies to improve the management of natural resources. In Indonesia, the lessons learned suggest that (4) mentality and behavior changes are to be encouraged and promoted. Women are meaningfully engaged in all three areas of work (productive, reproductive and community) and the opportunity for additional economic interventions targeted to them has great economic and social transformative potential. In China, there has been a reduction of poverty incidence and the private sector, through job creation and income generation, has assisted this process, while support within families and strong work ethics have made further invaluable contributions. Yet, women’s poverty still exists and is chronic in some rural areas.

Report available through EmpowerWomen.org (funded by the Government of Canada and facilitated by UN Women): Women’s Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia, and China.

Women's Allocation of Time in India, Indonesia and China

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings! I’m Lilian Chimuma, a Doctoral student at the University of Denver. I have a background in research methods and a strong interest in the practice and application of Evaluation. I believe cultural competence is central to the practice of evaluation and it varies contextually. I am recently exploring the context and scope of evaluation practice in developing countries.

Evaluations in developing Nations are amenably founded on and informed by Western paradigms. Many of these models reflect particular philosophies specific to the environments and conditions surrounding them, rather than those for the nations in which they are applied. Research and related discussions highlight concerns regarding the practice of evaluation in developing countries, including: cultural, contextual, and political reasons. Considering AEA’s stance on cultural competence, and its role and value in quality evaluation, it is essential to review evaluation practices across nations adopting evaluation paradigms developed in or by evaluators from regions other than their own. Such practices would advance social justice relative to indigenous cultures.

I focus on Africa in this discussion, highlighting some of the issues, and efforts towards the practice of evaluation.

Hot Tips:

The African Evaluation Association (AfrEA): Since its inception, AfrEA has grown and expanded its visibility within and beyond the continent. Among issues discussed by AfrEA members, the practice of evaluation given diverse cultural contexts on the continent stands out. Specifically, factors impacting the practice of evaluation on the continent include:

Lessons Learned:

  • Evaluation is vastly evolving in Africa considering cultural and contextual factors.
    • This is promising with implications for more actionable and practical evaluations.
    • Support for similar initiatives across other developing nations would advance and promote the growth and practice of evaluation, hence implications for cultural competence.
  • Evaluations should respect the culture, and not necessarily adopt evaluation frameworks coming from other cultures. Especially when they may not be appropriate!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi all, I’m Julie Peachey, Director of Poverty Measurement at Innovations for Poverty Action where I oversee a widely-used tool called the Poverty Probability Index (PPI).  It’s no surprise to me that the first Sustainable Development Goal is “End Poverty in all its forms everywhere’’ as so much of our international development work is designed with this objective in mind.  But how does an organization – social enterprise, NGO, corporation, impact investor – understand and report its contribution to this goal?no poverty

The first two indicators (1.1.1 and 1.1.2) for measuring progress against targets for SDG1 are the proportion of the population living below the international extreme poverty line (currently $1.90/ per person per day in 2011 PPP dollars) and the national poverty line.  So, an organization providing affordable access to goods, services and livelihood opportunities for this population or including them in their value chain as producers and entrepreneurs can simply report the percentage of its customers or beneficiaries that are below these two poverty lines.  But wait….simply….you say?  Getting household-level information on poverty / consumption / income / wealth is notoriously hard in developing countries.

Hot Tip:

Use the PPI.  It is a statistically rigorous yet inexpensive and easy-to-administer poverty measurement tool. The PPI is country specific, derived from national surveys, and uses ten questions and an intuitive scoring system. The PPI measures the likelihood that the respondent’s household is living below the poverty line, and is calibrated to both national and international poverty lines. There are PPIs for 60 countries and it is available for free download at www.povertyindex.org.

Zambia 2015 PPI User Guide

 

The PPI provides a measure of poverty that is both objective and standard – not particular to an area or country or sector.  This means that organizations and investors can compare the inclusiveness of their projects and programs within and across countries, and across sectors.

The PPI can be useful in reporting against other SDGs as well, especially those that are focused on inclusive access to services and markets, as well as those that aim to reduce inequality and engender inclusive growth.   Understanding whether initiatives are reaching the poorest and most vulnerable is integral to our collective progress against these targets.

Rad Resources: 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Welcome to ICCE week! This is Veronica Olazabal, Director of Measurement and Evaluation at the Rockefeller Foundation by day and Chair of the ICCE TIG by night – AEA Board Member always. We have a diverse set of posts this week written by our ICCE TIG colleagues that touch on how international evaluators are considering the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), gender issues, work in conflict states and bilingual tools. There is something for everyone and I encourage you to follow along!

I myself have recently returned from MERL Tech – London which in my opinion provides an excellent window into the future of evaluation. Since 2014, this event has convened professionals working in the international development sector as well as tech providers and data scientists to consider the role of technology in monitoring, evaluation, research and learning. Over two days, about 200 participants explored cutting edge topics such as big data, artificial intelligence, biometrics, and satellite imaging to support M&E.

drawing of computer, book, telephone being tossed into a light bulb

Hot Tips:

A few take-aways and interesting resources about the future of this work for evaluators:

  • It’s evolving quickly. We are no longer talking about “a tool” that will solve all our international development challenges – such as a “dashboard,” or a tech software. This is sobering as it moves the development sector further away from linear thinking and closer toward understanding that th
    is work is complex. Rad Resource: See this summary of Aid on the Edge of Chaos by Ben Ramalingam https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/aid-edge-chaos-book-you-really-need-read-and-think-about – reading the book is even better!
  • It’s becoming people-centric. While we spent less time talking about a tech-enabled tool, we did spend more time talking about the role of people. For instance, the people in the communities we are working in, the people collecting and analyzing data, the people running the tech-enabled platforms, the people making funding decisions etc. We even discussed people’s rights around data security, responsible data etc. It’s clear that as we move into the future, artificial intelligence will not (yet) overshadow the need for people across the international development ecosystem. Rad Resource: http://www.theengineroom.org/civil-society-digital-security-new-research/
  • It’s about valuing collaboration. Having been in this space for some time, I am often shocked by how extreme and dogmatic we can be about our own points of views. For example, that data science will make evaluation obsolete, or why even do evaluation when monitoring is the key etc. I found the MERL Tech discussions this year more focused on collaboration and working together to find common ground.This is exciting in that it acknowledges that we need to bring ALL our skills to the table to problem-solve around measuring impact and ultimately improving the lives of millions. Rad Resource: http://merltech.org/the-future-of-development-evaluation-in-the-age-of-big-data/

Interested In Learning More?

  • Sign up for ICTworks, which is a unique resource for learning about MERL TECH from both user experiences and technical experts.
  • Attend a MERL Tech – the next one is in Johannesburg in August. To learn more and to follow the active conversation around technology and its applications to M&E, please visit org.

 

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating International and Cross-Cultural (ICCE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the International and Cross-Cultural Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our ICCE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hello Everyone! I’m Sheila B Robinson, AEA365’s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor with some pointers on adding photos, icons, graphics or other visuals to your blog article. It’s important to abide by the rules when we’re publishing original content here or on our own blogs and websites.

Want to submit a draft article to AEA365 with images attached?

Hot Tips: We can only use images under one of these conditions:

1.) They are original, created by the author of the post, and unpublished elsewhere.

2.) They are in the public domain. Images in the public domain have no copyright restrictions and are free to use.

3.) They are Creative Commons licensed. About a year ago, I published Mind Your Manners When it Comes to Visuals! by Sheila B Robinson, an article focused mostly on understanding Creative Commons. If you’re not yet familiar, I’d recommend reading it, or better yet, head right over to the Creative Commons site and learn from the source! Hotter Tip: You’ll need to know which CC license is associated with your image. Some require attribution, and some allow you to make changes to the image, while others do not.

4.) They are copyrighted, but you have express written permission from the author/owner of the image to use it with your blog article.blank polaroid images

Lesson Learned: Royalty-free does not mean the same as free! Royalty-free means that once you pay for a license to use the image, you can then use them many times without paying additional fees.  If you see a watermark on a photo (e.g. you can see the word “Shutterstock” or another company name behind the image), you don’t have a license to use it and it is restricted.

Cool Trick: We’ve featured a number of articles on using and creating images. Try these two:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Greetings! We are Larry Dershem (Senior Advisor, Research & Evaluation), Ashley Bishop (Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Advisor), and Brad Kerner (Senior Director, Sponsorship Program) working for Save the Children (SC), which is an international charitable relief and development organization that seeks to ensure children survive, learn, and are protected internationally and in the US.

A retrospective impact evaluation (RIE) is an ex post evaluation of an evaluand to assess its value, worth, and merit, with a special focus on examining sustainability of intended results as well as unintended impacts. However, due to resource constraints, international development donors and organizations cannot afford to conduct many RIEs, limiting our ability to truly understand longer-term outcomes and impacts after the closure of a program. Save the Children’s sponsorship programs are currently investigating the feasibility of conducting RIEs in order to optimize learning from scarce resources.

With invaluable professional assistance from E. Jane Davidson (RealEvaluation) and Thomaz Chianca (independent consultant), we developed a RIE Evaluability Scoping Guide to assess the feasibility of conducting an RIE. The RIE Scoping Guide assesses 24 issues categorized into the following four dimensions: 1) Internal Stakeholder Support, 2) External Stakeholder Support, 3) Availability of Evidence & Documentation, and 4) Context. After program staff review, discuss and score each of the 24 issues, a tally of the scores indicate which of the four feasibility categories best describes the feasibility of a RIE.

RIE Feasibility Categories

RIE Feasibility Categories diagram

(click for larger image)

To date, five sponsorship programs implemented for 10-years, and ended 5 to 9 year ago in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Ethiopia, have been assessed. All five programs are either “Adequately Evaluation Ready” or “Fully Evaluation Ready”; therefore, in the next year SC plans to commission at least one RIE.

Lesson Learned:

  • To avoid confusion, be clear with program staff that an evaluability assessment of a program is NOT an evaluation of a program.
  • For program staff to clearly asses the evaluability issues under the 4 dimensions, each issue should have a short description and set of questions to be answered.

Hot Tips:

  • Having specific dimensions and issues that are critical for a RIE to be feasible after a program has ended allows staff to incorporate these issues into the program from the beginning.
  • SC has established an optimal window of 5-10 years after completion of a program to conduct a RIE which allows for longer-term impacts to occur but not too long to limit the number of confounding factors.

Rad Resources:

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

I’m Isabelle Collins and I was the Principal Analyst, Monitoring and Evaluation at Superu (the Social Policy Evaluation and Research Unit) in New Zealand.

Bridging Cultural Perspectives cover

Rad Resource:

My colleagues at Superu, and its previous entity the Families Commission, have published the Bridging Cultural Perspectives approach. This approach acknowledges and respects the value of all knowledge streams. The approach also provides spaces for dialogue between the knowledge streams.   This is a new way of collaboration that requires researchers, policy makers, planners and decision-makers to go beyond their previous conceptual boundaries. You can download the paper here.

Bridging Cultural Perspectives is made up of two models. One, He Awa Whiria – Braided Rivers, was developed by Angus Macfarlane as part of his work in the Advisory Group on Conduct Problems. The model is dynamic. It allows for different cultural knowledge systems to function separately or together, just as the streams of a braided river flow apart or together in their journey to the sea.

NZ braided rivers diagram

The other model, Negotiated Spaces, was developed by researchers in the Te Hau Mihi Ata project. It applies the traditional concept of w?nanga to the modern context. The w?nanga are designed to facilitate conversation between m?tauranga M?ori experts and M?ori scientists.

The two models work together well – He Awa Whiria – Braided Rivers provides a conceptual model and Negotiated Spaces provides the dialogue space and the means of application.

Hot Tip: The Superu website has links to a range of work in this area, including  Family Wellbeing and Wh?nau Rangatiratanga Frameworks. http://www.superu.govt.nz/current-projects/families-and-wh-nau-wellbeing-research-programme. This page includes latest contact details for key researchers on the programme, as Superu itself is in the process of being disestablished. Grab it while you can!

Hot Tip: If you haven’t been to New Zealand to see our amazing braided rivers, you really should.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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