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CAT | Social Media Tools & Updates

Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Posting on multiple social media sites requires good imagery, and on a low budget this can be tough. Images make your content eye-catching and can even add context to a post. On all channels, posting with images out preforms those without images. Canva is an easy and free way to create your own graphics, charts, infographics, and images. Today, I will show you how to create an image using free Canva formats, layouts, and photos.

Rad Resource: Choose your format

Each social media channel has a preferred image size. This size will allow your photos to be clearly viewed in a newsfeed. Canva takes the guess work out, and helps you create images specifically for each channel. They have an array of sizes you can choose from. You can even create a custom design by entering your own dimensions. For this example, we will be choosing the Facebook post format.

Rad Resource: Find a Layout

Canva offer many free layout that you can edit with your own content. Simply click on the layout you like and it will be added to your canvas.

Rad Resource: Edit your image

Once you have selected your desired layout, you can now add photos and text to your image. If you have a photo you would like to use, simply upload it to Canva under “uploads”. If you don’t have a photo, you’re in luck. Canva offers high quality stock photos for free. Browse the collection and find the one that works for your graphic. Once you find the photo, drag it onto the canvas.

Next, click on the text of your image and update the content. You can also change the color of text and backgrounds as you desire.

Once you are happy with your creation, download your image by selecting the “download” button in the right corner. Now you can post it to Facebook and promote your webinar!

I look forward to seeing lots of designs in my newsfeed!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for the AEA. LinkedIn stands out as the social platform for professional development and industry sharing. It is a great resource for presenting yourself as an experienced evaluator as well as finding resources and networking opportunities that will benefit your practice and strategies. I have compiled a few tips that will help you create a stronger personal profile, and identified LinkedIn resources.

Hot Tip: Enhance your Profile

Go beyond just including a photo, work experience, and education – really enhance your profile by including your publications, skills, awards, independent course work, volunteer experience, or organizations you belong to. All of these features allow you to have a robust, well-rounded profile and will highlight your expertise as an evaluator.

Hot Tip: Use key words

Create a list of keywords that accurately communicate your expertise. For example, evaluation, visual data, statistics, research, and monitoring are searchable key words that resonate with evaluation. To improve your profile, incorporate these keywords repeatedly in your profile descriptions. This will allow your profile to be ranked high when the words are searched within LinkedIn. Placing keywords in your profile headline is also a great way to show your expertise and helps other users make an informed decision about connecting with you.

Hot Tip: Customize your LinkedIn URL.

When you join LinkedIn, the site creates a generic URL for your profile that includes a series of numbers. Similar to a website URL, these numbers do not resonate high in a search. Placing your name or keywords into your URL will improve the visibility of your profile. Here is a list of Instructions for how to customize your URL.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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meHi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. I was recently asked how I find and choose articles to post on the AEA social media sites, so I thought I would share my resources with everyone. When posting on social media, I try to maintain a good mix of association news, to keep our community informed about AEA, and evaluation news, to keep our community informed and about trends and lessons learned in evaluation. Here is where I pull my information:

Rad Resource: Twitter

Twitter is an excellent resource for finding content. I will often search relevant hashtags such as #Eval, #Evaluation, and #DataViz to find posts relating to these topics. I do have to do a little digging to make sure I find articles and resources that are informative, reliable, and can relate back to our community – but the content I find is often very rich and diverse.

In addition to searching on twitter, I follow many evaluators who are using the platform. This is helpful, because I can then see what other evaluators are posting 1) to share their content on our sites and 2) to gain a better understanding on what content is relevant and trending in evaluation. Here’s just a few evaluators I follow:

annkemery | Ann K. Emery

clysy | Christopher Lysy

EJaneDavidson | Jane Davidson

EvaluationMaven | Kylie Hutchinson

John_Gargani | John Gargani

Rad Resource: Evaluation Blogs

I follow a lot of evaluation blogs to find insights from our members. I often share posts that I believe are relevant and will resonate with our community. These blog posts allow AEA to share multiple points of view on evaluation related topics. Below are a few blogs that I use for my “go-to” resources:

BetterEvalution

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity

Evergreen Data Blog

Ann K. Emery’s blog

Eval Central

Rad Resource: Resources from AEA

AEA has a whole page of great resources for finding evaluation content. Click here to see evaluators that are active on social media and an array of evaluation related blogs. This is a great starting point for curating content for your social media posts!

I hope this information is helpful. If you have other great evaluation resources, please share them in the comments. Get busy posting!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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My name is Sondra LoRe and I often have the pleasure of helping organizations set up and evaluate their social media footprint. I work for the National Institute for STEM Evaluation and Research (NISER) at the University of TN, and while most of the social media evaluations I design are related to STEM educators and programs, the formats are applicable to any organization.

Hot Tip #1: Investigate

My first step in beginning a social media design is to do some investigating. With permission, I gain access to the analytics portion of any used platforms and follow activity. What’s hot? When are users most active? What platforms have the most activity?  I recommend checking news feeds to see what people are engaging in related to your content area. This could also be done incrementally by adding additional platforms and tracking engagement.

Hot Tip#2: Rule of Threes

Follow a Rule of Threes for content creation:

  • A third of the time promote others by sharing their posts and/or content. This will increase your views on other news feeds.
  • A third of the time promote your client by sharing news related to the business/project. Consider a personal component to these posts to help audiences get to know your client.
  • The last third should be related to content/learning that will increase the knowledge base of your business or project. For example, if your client is an online food safety curriculum for middle school teachers, a third of the time should be spent sharing content related to the benefits of best practices in middle school education curriculum design.

Rad Resource: Schedule for serenity

Keeping up with multiple platforms and evaluations can be a daunting task. Social media management software such as Hootsuite can help keep you organized. Take time to reflect and analyze the activity and engagement around your posts by using the analytic tools built into platforms. Need help learning to use social media analytics? Lynda.com is a fee resource with wonderful instructional videos and YouTube has a bounty of free videos like this one, How to Build A Social Media Plan.

Lesson Learned: Research vs. Gut

General social media market research may not fit your targeted audience so do some exploring of your own and follow your gut. What may be the most popular platforms, posting times, and trending topics on social media may be completely different for your group.  For example, in a recent evaluation, I found that Facebook is the platform of choice for middle school science teachers and that they are most active on Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons.  When I moved my posts from the days and times that research suggested, the engagement tripled in size.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. As we reach the end of 2016, I wanted to provide some insights on what is predicted for social media platforms for 2017. I put together this list based on numerous industry blogs and my own insights. Let’s see what happens in 2017!

2017

Hot Tip: Quality Vs. Quantity

Platforms such as Instagram where users typically post once or twice per day are on the rise. This relates to the need for content that has more substance and is not overwhelming. Twitter is built for multiple posts, but often the posts have a short lifespan, and can clutter a news feed. Will we start to see twitter decline or change in the near future?

I also believe users will be looking for trustworthy platforms that are dedicated to showing true content. In the wake of speculation of social media spreading “fake news”, I expect Facebook and similar platforms to make this a priority in 2017.

Hot Tip: Show Users Your Event

With the popularity of Facebook Live and Snap Chat, it is no longer enough to just post about an event. You have to show the event through real-time videos and pictures. These tools make your users feel like they are a part of the action.

Hot Tip: Storytelling Will Continue to be King

Although no stranger to 2016, storytelling will be important for engagement in 2017. Similar to presenting your evaluation findings, your social media posts should go beyond recommendations or “the sell” and show the big picture and overall benefits. This is how you create online discussions and avoid the dreaded one-way conversations.

This will be my last post before 2017, so I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. I look forward to see what is in store for 2017! Add your predictions for 2017 in the comments.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Now that you are back from Evaluation 2016, how are you going to keep in touch with the connections you made in Atlanta? How about using LinkedIn? LinkedIn is a great way to follow up with your peers and colleagues form the conference.

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Hot Tip: Use LinkedIn to Build Your Professional Network

LinkedIn is the social media channel that is best for professional networking. On LinkedIn, you can search by name, company, or occupation. So, if you are not good with names you can still means to look people up! You can also search by keywords such as Evaluation or Evaluator.

Hot Tip: Build out Your LinkedIn Page so you are Easy to Find

Make your LinkedIn profile easy to find. First, make sure you have a recent photo of yourself. Next fill out your profile using searchable keywords such as evaluation, data visualization, research, internal evaluation, or health evaluation. You can also include your TIG involvement. Add the TIG you work with to the “Volunteer” section on your profile. Taking these steps will allow your profile to be easily searched by other evaluation practitioners.

Hot Tip: Follow the Evaluation 2016 Exhibitors on LinkedIn

Make connection with the exhibitors from Evaluation 2016. Like the company pages of organizations such as Abt Associates, IntegReview IRB, and Mathematica Policy Research. You can also find individuals who work at these organizations on their company page.

Hot Tip: Accept Your Digital Badge and Add it to Your Page

And one more thing…accept your digital badge from Evaluation 2016 and add it to your LinkedIn page! Use the badge to show your involvement with AEA and dedication to professional development.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

Twitter is a great tool for staying social at conferences. It provides real-time opportunities for sharing content and insights. Here are a few tips to help you be social during your upcoming conferences! You can even use these at Evaluation 2016.

Follow the Conference Hashtag

Most conferences have a hastag which allows you to follow information and news relating to the event. On Twitter, the pound sign (or hash) turns any word that directly follow it into a searchable link. This allows you to organize content and track discussion topics based on keywords. While at a conference, search for the appropriate hashtag (this will most likely be posted at the conference) to see all discussions taking place around the event. From here you can retweet, or even create your own post to stay active in the conversation. At Evaluation 2016, you can use #Eval16.

Retweet Other Users

While attending a conference, retweet posts by other attendees. Retweeting will allow you to spread content to more followers on Twitter and will give you the opportunity to be included in conversations surrounding the event.

Live Tweet a Session

Sharing insights and quotes from presentations and speakers is a great way to help evaluators who couldn’t attend the conference or decided to attend a different session. Live tweeting also helps you build relationships with the speakers. Find the speaker on twitter and add their twitter handle to your post!

Share Photos of your Experience

Photos are a great way to tell a story about your experience at the conference and allow evaluators who were not able to attend an opportunity to visualize the conference. Photos are dominant on Twitter, meaning your photos will be more likely to be retweeted by other attendees, the conference host, and speakers, expanding your exposer to a larger community.

I can’t wait to see what everyone tweets come October at Evaluation 2016! Follow AEA at @aeaweb and use #Eval16 to follow updates and news about the conference.

follow-namss-on-twitter-2

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA.

With so many different social media platforms to choose from (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram…) it can be hard to identify the platform that works best for your content and the people you are trying to reach with your message. I have outlined a few insights on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest that could help you determine where your content fits in on the social media spectrum.

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Hot Tip: Facebook

The most prominent age group on Facebook ranges between 25-34 years of age. This is closely followed by 35-44. Facebook requires unique content which can come in the form of photos, links, or videos. It is often difficult to re-purpose content on Facebook, because of the longevity of a post. However, the benefit to Facebook post longevity is that you do not have to post as often as other platforms, such as Twitter.  Depending on your desired activity, Facebook posts can occur a few times a week versus every day.

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Hot Tip: Twitter

Twitter and Facebook are very similar in terms of activity users. Twitter also attracts 25-34 years of age  followed closely by 35-44. The main difference with Twitter, is the life of the post. Twitter is saturated with content, which means your post might only be seen for a limited amount of time before it is pushed to the bottom of a news feed. Due to this short post lifespan, to use Twitter effectively, you need lots of content! Content should be posted to Twitter every day. This content should be a mix of original and shared (retweeted) posts.

Twitter is a great platform for re-purposing your content. Because of a Twitter post’s lifespan, you can repost the same or similar content multiple times to capture the best engagement.

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Hot Tip: LinkedIn

LinkedIn captures a similar age group as Twitter and Facebook, however the active users tend to be more professional and with some type of higher education. LinkedIn is a great place to post content that is relevant to education, career advancement, and research. The active users on LinkedIn are motivated by career goals and professional networking. Content for LinkedIn should be unique similar to Facebook.

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Hot Tip: Pinterest

Pinterest is by far dominated by women. To be successful on this platform you must have an archive of photos or visuals to choose from. Pins that are posted to Pinterest have a long shelf life, due to the active sharing and re-pinning of content. Pinterest is a great tool for sharing your data visualization examples!

I hope this blog provides a better understanding of each platform and helps you decide where to take your content. Use the comments below to share your thoughts.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. There are many reasons to start blogging: to share your work and strategies for evaluations; to become an evaluation through leader; to become a stronger writer and explain your thoughts—the reasons can be endless. I have compiled a few tips to help you create an effective blog that resonates with your followers.

Creating a Blog

Hot Tip: Content

First, identify themes, concepts, or trends that relate to your audience or other evaluators. What topics will you highlight in your blog and how will your blog stand out? For example, will your blog focus entirely on data visualization, or trends in evaluation? Once this is decided you can start working on the details.

Next, decide how often you are going to blog. Is your blog going to be a daily blog, weekly blog, or monthly blog? When making this decision, you must look at your content resources and your available time. What can you commit to, and how and from what sources are you going to gather your content?

Hot Tip: Writing

When writing a blog, you want to be aware of tone, length, and formatting. Write in a conversational tone, using personal pronouns whenever possible.  You also don’t want your blog to be too long. Typically a blog post is 1,000 words or less.  In addition, you want to break up long paragraphs or text. Try bullet points, numbered lists, or visuals to make your post more interesting.

Hot Tip: Call to Action

An important aspect of blogging is starting a conversation and obtaining your follower’s feedback. Invite your follower’s to provide their opinions or questions in the comments. This allows your post to have a longer shelf life and helps you engage with other evaluators.

I look forward to reading your blogs on evaluation! Please share your tips or questions in the comments.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Facebook is a great tool for reaching other evaluation professionals. The platform makes it easy to share relevant articles, videos, and thoughts with your followers. However, It can be difficult to get your posts on your follower’s newsfeeds because Facebook only shares 12% of your content. You can increase this percentage by writing effective and engaging Facebook posts!

Hot Tip: Keep your post short

Facebook posts should be 1-3 sentences. If a post is too long, a “see more” button will appear. Nine times out of 10 Facebook users will not click on this button and read the rest of your content. Keeping your post short and sweet can make a big difference in engagement.

Hot Tip: Ask you followers to interact

Asking your followers to comment encourages engagement and involvement. You can use this tactic by stating “like this post if you agree” or “share your thoughts in the comments”. Another way to encourage engagement is to ask your followers for advice. This tactic often starts a discussion on your page.

Hot Tip: Make your links compelling

When posting a link to an article on your Facebook page, make sure the link has a compelling photo and interesting title. These are editable fields, meaning you can customize how your link appears. Sometimes links can pull titles and pictures that are not relevant to your content.

Hot Tip: Use different types of posts

Mix up the content formats you are posting to your page. Use a mix of links, pictures, videos, and albums to make your page more interesting.

What are your favorite Facebook tips? Tell us in the comments!

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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