AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Independent Consulting

Hello good people! My name is Robert Perez and I am a research assistant at Hamai Consulting and a Data Analyst at Youth Policy Institute.

My first foray into independent consulting happened was when I was offered the opportunity to work at a small consulting company. Admittedly, I was nervous in the beginning but I knew that this was what I wanted to do; and I had an inspiring leader who would later become my unofficial guide through the world of independent consulting. I still have a long way to go.

Lessons Learned:

Find your passion. I spent my college years exploring a variety of topics within the field of Psychology, with particular focus on the research realm. I knew I was interested in the psychological development of youth. I read anything I could get my hands on until I found what I thought was the most interesting topic: Positive Youth Development. Ask yourself all the thoughtful questions. What are you curious about? What are you good at? In what ways could you use your skills to pursue your passion?

Once you’ve identified your passion, find others who share your interests and passions. I’m a bit of an introvert, so connecting with people is not one of my strong suits. Thankfully, I can still connect with people online! Post or respond to questions in your LinkedIn networks or use good ‘ol Facebook to search for groups that revolve around some of your interests.

Begin demonstrating your skill. Consider starting a blog or a vlog (video blog) where you can share your insights, experiences, or interesting tools. Writing a blog can help you refine your writing skills, build professional relationships, and afford you the opportunity to educate others about your field of expertise. Do a search online to find out what other evaluators are writing about see where you can fill in any gaps. Reach out to other bloggers to build relationships!

Rad Resource:

One of the most important pieces of advice that has been shared with me is this: don’t forget to learn about the business side of things. All of the consultants I’ve talked to tell me how important it is to balance my ideals with managing a business. I frequently turn to Consulting And Evaluation With Nonprofit And Community-Based Organizations by Viola and McMahon as a reference. It offers accessible insights about where to begin if you are considering starting a consulting firm with a focus on nonprofits, from developing your fee structures to what kinds of services to provide.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

Koolamalsi Njoos (greetings colleagues).  I’m Dr. Nicole Bowman-Farrell, the Founder and President of Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC), a consulting firm located in Wisconsin.  As a traditional Mohican and Lunaape – Munsee (AKA Delaware) Indigenous person, the concept of writing an origin story about BPC is steeped in traditional cultures.  If you know who you are and where you come from then those origin stories help shape how you do business.  BPC started in 2001 as a result of standing my ground professionally, ethically, and morally.

Over five centuries ago, the first Europeans reached Turtle Island.  The Stockbridge Munsee Indians (that is the contemporary name of my Tribal community) lived in the East and in Canada.  We were amongst the first to start an entrepreneurial relationship with the Dutch fur traders in the early 1600’s.  As we were forcibly removed across the country, my community survived. Being resilient problem solvers and smart negotiators transfers well to sustaining a business.

I’m at least the fifth generation of entrepreneurs in the Bowman family.  That’s a picture of my great Grandpa Beaumont Bowman in 1917 who was a contracted logger for many communities in WI.  He’s leading the team, looking sharp, and standing at the top of his game!  Knowing my history is so valuable; it helped sustain my business, where many tough decisions are made.

As a Tribal community, we were always on the move and as a business owner you must never be still.  Adapting to changing resources, political environments, and market needs is key to long term success. There are generations of Bowmans that contributed to our strong family reputation:  hard working, generous and kind, and honest and ethical. These are solid lessons that a business owner needs to live by if they want to be respected, impactful, and sought after as a trusted partner/collaborator.

Hot Tip: Traditional elders tell us that there isn’t “good or bad” there just “is.” In everything that happens, remember to find the lesson in it.  That is good advice for your personal life or your profession.  I enjoy my free subscription to White Bison’s Elder Meditation of the Day (by Don Coyhis, Mohican).

Cool Trick:  Tricksters, in Indigenous storytelling, serve an important purpose to the community.  Sometimes by tricking someone you teach them important lessons.  Check out “Trickster:  Native American Trickster Tales – A Graphic Collection”.

Rad Resource: Indianpreneurship is the fusion of traditional teachings with contemporary sustainable business practices.  It is social entrepreneurship at its best:  evidence based and culturally situated while still making a living and making a true difference in the lives of others.

Lesson Learned:  The toughest times of my business (former employee stole nearly $100,000) taught me the most about myself and my business acumen.  There were a lot of tears and sleepless nights. The relationship of money, emotions, and being a woman played into this life lesson.  My relationship with money, charitable giving, profitability, and sustainability now all co-exist in a balanced and peaceful way with each other.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

Hi! I’m Myia Welsh of Welsh & Company Evaluation Consulting. I’m also the Chair-Elect of the Independent Consulting TIG. I’m going to share an independent consulting origin story that isn’t often talked about, but I suspect is rather common: dire necessity.

Years ago I was laid off. Yep. Lost my job. It was awful. I loved that job and those co-workers. But change is the only constant in this life, right? So, I had to turn that lemon into lemonade. I was really lucky to have been working with an evaluation consulting firm that let the junior staff in on the business development end of the operation, so I knew just a little about how things worked with proposals, contracts, and the like. Let’s be real here: what I didn’t know could fill volumes (and that is probably still the case). Going independent was terrifying, but I already had been doing evaluation consulting, so continuing to do it seemed like the quickest way from unemployment to a paycheck.

Lesson Learned: Clients can come from anywhere. My longest client relationship developed out of my interest in becoming a potential volunteer for an organization that does work I’m really passionate about. I thought I would have to tirelessly respond to Requests For Proposals, but it turned out that current relationships were far more fruitful.

Lesson Learned: There is so much help to start a business. I leaned very heavily on my state Small Business Development Center (SBDC). Most states have SBDC initiatives that include training, resources, and even one on one business coaching. My business coach walked me through my business license forms and my state LLC paperwork. The U.S. Small Business Administration has fantastic help as well: training, regional offices, partner networks, and more. All for free.

Lesson Learned: Everything comes to an end, even if it isn’t how we imagined. As it turned out, my lemonade is pretty good. I bet yours could be too.

Rad Resources: There is support out there in all kinds of forms!

  • The S. Small Business Administration has free online training, regional offices and partner networks to help fledgling businesses.
  • SCORE is a national nonprofit dedicated to helping small businesses get started. They have over 300 chapters across the country and will set you up with a business mentor.
  • There are many podcasts dedicated to starting and running a business. Two of my favorites are StartUp and Being Boss.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

No tags

Hello, I am Matt Feldmann, the principal researcher and owner of Goshen Education Consulting, Inc. and the out-going chair for the Independent Consulting TIG.  My company focuses on educational evaluation and data support for clients in Southern Illinois.

I started my company in 2011 based on the unmet needs for educational evaluation in my local community. I was a data analyst for a local college and took on a “side-job” that turned into a couple of jobs…and finally ended up being too much for a moonlighting effort. Before I left the full-time dependable position, I wrote a business plan to convince myself (and my wife) that this was not a fool’s errand. The following are some ideas when writing a business plan for an independent evaluation practice.

 Lessons Learned: The following are some concepts that will inform your internal business plan document.

Practice what you preach. Many of us help our clients with program development including the identification of objectives, logic models, and SMART goals. Your business needs many of the same things including a mission statement, vision, and organizational principles. These ground your organization and provide you with direction for what you are good at, who you are, and who you serve.

Identify your services and your target market. It is important to identify what you can do and who you can serve, and it is equally important to set limits on who you will serve. For example, I try to do most of my work in Southern Illinois (not in Missouri), even though I live about 20 miles from the Illinois-Missouri border. While my market is geographical, it could just as easily be based on your skills, or knowledge of a sector.

Know your competition and your sales strategy. It is likely that others have completed evaluations in your target market. Knowing these firms and individual consultants will inform how you will approach your potential clients and how to develop your sales strategy.

Rad Resources:

Rhonda Abrams, a small business columnist for USA Today, has provided me with a constant source of material for reflection and strategy for my small business. You should check out her book on successful business plans: Successful Business Plan: Secrets & Strategies.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

Dana Powell Russell

Hi, everyone, this is Dana Powell Russell, Ed.D., sharing my path to independent evaluation consulting. Funny thing is, I set a vision for myself at age 15 of ultimately becoming an independent consultant—I’m not sure how that seed was planted, but here is how it has unfolded…

I started my K-12 education career leading museum outreach in the public schools. In the 1-month gap between one museum job and other, I picked up two brief consulting projects and, in today’s lingo, my “side-hustle” was born. In the ensuing 14 years I developed my full-time career in museum and arts education, while consulting part-time on the side with colleagues and former employers.

As an education director, I became passionate about program evaluation, and decided that would be the focus of my future consulting practice. I earned a doctorate in education on nights and weekends to hone my research skills. When a dear colleague my same age passed away very suddenly, it sparked a pivotal “life is too short” moment, and I decided to take the plunge into full-time independent consulting. My springboard included 20 years of nonprofit and education experience, a two-decades-strong colleague network and, as luck would have it, 14 years of part-time consulting experience already under my belt.

A decade later, I’m grateful for a full dance card, which I chalk up to the following Lessons Learned:

  1. Expand your skillset: Every experience in your career is a chance to build your skillset for future consulting. A broad, adaptable skillset is the best insurance for a full consulting plate and repeat business—the broader the better.
  2. Get (and stay) educated: Figure out what expertise you’ll need for your consulting niche, and carve out the time to get it. Beyond core degrees, staying on top of your game is easy now with abundant online courses and webinars.
  3. Get your feet wet: Don’t wait until you can consult full time; start consulting part-time now with bite-sized projects. It’s a great way to find out if consulting is really for you; plus when you decide to go full-time, you’ll already be an experienced consultant!
  4. Be visible: Engage in social media, workgroups, governing boards, and professional associations in your field; attend conferences, make presentations, get out there! Being a presence ensures that you’ll stay top of mind, and you just may find RFPs in your inbox rather than having to seek them out.

Rad Resources:

  • Peter Block’s Flawless Consulting, and the Fieldbook & Companion that go with it contain solid advice for all kinds of consulting, with a practical tone and real-world examples.
  • Gail Barrington’s Consulting Start-Up and Management is geared specifically toward evaluators and researchers like us. Her perspective on the personal characteristics and skills for success in evaluation consulting is spot on.
  • Nolo Press (com) is a great resource for navigating the legal aspects of running a small business, and they offer publications tailored to the laws of individual states throughout the country.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

Independence Day is approaching, which means the Independent Consulting TIG is taking over aea365 and we’ve decided to tell our origin stories. Up first, me. My name is Laura Keene, owner of Keene Insights and this year’s Independent Consulting TIG Chair.

It’s not a very exciting origin story, but it speaks to a key point when it comes to starting a business: You just have to get out there and meet people! In 2012, I left a full-time job with every intention of finding another one. I had some contract work to keep me busy in between, but I realized pretty quickly that I really enjoyed the freelance life. So, being the introvert that I am, I did the next logical thing in my mind: I grabbed a pile of books and began reading all about how to start a business. A month later (possibly longer), I got a call from my “little” brother (he’s 30 and several inches taller than me). He also owns a business, which he started back in 2007. Here’s how that call went:

Little bro: How’s it going with the business?

Me: Great! I’m learning all about contracts, and accounting, and marketing, and business structures.

Little bro: Awesome. Any prospects? Are you finding some good networking opportunities?

Me: Um, well, I haven’t actually left the house yet.

Little bro: What? Silly goose! Get out from behind your books!

He was absolutely right. A week later, I finally mustered up the fortitude to make it to my first event. It was a total miss. Let’s just say no one in that room was going to ever hire an evaluator, but I networked like crazy anyway. Those early conversations were so hard. It took a while and a lot more events to figure out how to articulate my passion, experience, and expertise. But, I got there. Five years and a whole lot of connections later, Keene Insights is thriving.

Lesson Learned:

With few exceptions, in order to get a business off the ground (or even just grow professionally) we have to get out there and build relationships: Relationships with potential clients, plus collaborators, mentors, influencers, and more. Check out this post I wrote on networking for some tips and resources.

Rad Resources:

While you’re making those connections, it doesn’t hurt to spend a little time in some business how-to books. Here are a few of my faves:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating IC TIG Week with our colleagues in the Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

My name is Tamara Hamai, and I am President of Hamai Consulting, an evaluation firm focused on improving child well-being from cradle through career.  I’ve been consulting since 2007, and have learned a lot of lessons the hard way.  Ever since adopting the Book Yourself Solid system (created by Michael Port), I’ve benefited from 90 Day Planning to stabilize my cash flow and work load.

Hot Tips:

Every 90 days, set aside a few hours to map out your revenue goal and how you will achieve it.

Step 1: Budget your known and projected expenses for the next 90 days.  Make sure to include your salary!  Set a gross revenue goal that will cover all of your expenses, plus some profit as an emergency fund for the future. What services do you need to sell at what prices to bring in this revenue?  Identify the best (i.e., one big contract) and worst case (i.e., lots of little gigs) scenarios.

Step 2: What marketing do you need to generate the leads that will produce the sales needed to achieve your revenue goal?  For example, looking back at your past networking activities, what and how much did you have to do to land a new project?  What and how much would you need to do of those same activities over the next 90 days to hit your target revenue?  Identify at least 2 marketing strategies (e.g., networking and proposals) that would each get you to your target, just in case one fails.

Step 3: Tackle at least one system improvement each 90 days that will help you get things done more efficiently and effectively.  For example, you might realize you don’t have the data you need to know what types or how much of networking you need to engage in before you win a contract.  You could plan to build a networking tracking system (which could be as simple as a spreadsheet) to start collecting this information.

Step 4: Create a daily action plan.  What projects need to be done to achieve your 90 day goals?  Map out each task that must be completed to implement your marketing and system improvement plans, then set deadlines.  Identify tasks for each day for all 90 days.

Lessons Learned:

Be realistic with your goals.  Set small revenue goals at first, and get bigger as you get more successful.

Add extra profit in your revenue goals early on to build up an emergency fund that will eventually eliminate the feast-famine roller coaster.

Rad Resource:

Book Yourself Solid, by Michael Port: http://bit.ly/2e6CrTz

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Independent Consulting TIG Week with our colleagues in the IC AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

No tags

My name is Elayne Vlahaki and I am the President of Catalyst Consulting Inc., an independent evaluation consulting firm based in Vancouver, British Columbia. I have held multiple sessional appointments teaching the Program Planning and Evaluation course within the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University. You can follow me on Twitter @Catalyst_Tweets.

A colleague recently explained to me that their organization has been underwhelmed by evaluation consultants they have hired in the past. He emphasized the gap between what they were looking for and what was ultimately produced. I left this conversation thinking about the importance of understanding your clients’ needs and then delivering on them in order for projects to be successful. Here are some tips for how you can be systematic about identifying and understanding potential clients’ needs.

Hot Tips:

  • Do Your Homework. Prior to meeting with a potential client, aim to learn as much as possible about the organization and broader environment in which it operates. This will demonstrate your credibility and improve the relevance of your proposed evaluation approach. Cruising the Internet ten minutes before your meeting won’t cut it. Be systematic about your research process and be sure to explore the wide range of information sources available to you, from program documents to industry reports.
  • Listen Carefully. How can you understand a potential client’s needs without giving them the opportunity to tell you? This may sound simple but meaningfully listening without planning a response or thinking about solutions to their challenges can be difficult. Actively listening will show that you are genuinely interested in learning about their organization.
  • Ask Questions. Asking thoughtful questions is one of the most valuable tools you have to learn about your potential client. Ask open-ended questions that will help you define the scope of their needs, which will then help you define the rough boundaries for your proposed solutions.
  • Ongoing Assessment. Remember that clients’ evaluation needs will shift over time. It is critical that you review and respond to their changing needs to ensure that your evaluation findings will actually be used to inform decision-making and change.
  • Learn From Business. Most often evaluation consultants are technical and subject-matter experts, but tend to be less familiar with the consulting process from a business perspective. Developing and refining our consulting skills can help us better identify our clients’ needs, but can also equip us with a range of other tools to be successful. Gail Barrington has produced a wide range of training resources about independent consulting skills for evaluators. Check out her book entitled, “Consulting Start-up and Management: A Guide for Evaluator and Applied Researchers”.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Independent Consulting TIG Week with our colleagues in the IC AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

No tags

My name is Jennifer Dewey, and I am a Senior Director with Walter R. McDonald and Associates, Inc. (WRMA). Over the years, I have worked for organizations that receive a substantial amount of business in health and human services from Federal, state, and local-level entities. A key method to obtaining this work is partnering with subcontractors and consultants to respond to requests for proposals, or RFPs.

“Prime” responders (those who will take 51% or more of the work) look to subcontractors (an organization) and independent consultants (an individual) to enhance their bids. Subcontractors and consultants do this by providing content or technical knowledge that the prime doesn’t have enough of, or doesn’t have at all. For example, a history of working with certain populations (e.g. military and veterans, indigenous peoples) or specialized statistical expertise (e.g., social network analysis). Subcontractors and consultants may enhance a bid by being based in one or more locations where the project will take place, bringing their knowledge of the local government, population(s), and community structure to the work.

Many of these partnerships are generated through networking, where a prime representative knows an independent consultant or staff member at a potential subcontractor that can bring the needed knowledge and skills to an RFP response.

Rad Resource: Familiarize yourself with available Federal contract vehicles, such as AHRQ (www.ahrq.gov), CDC (www.cdc.gov), GSA MOBIS (www.gsa.gov), HHS PSC (www.ngsservices.com/program_support_center.html) HRSA (www.hrsa.gov), SAMHSA (www.samhsa.gov), and others to learn about past and future contracts. Consulting organizations often list their contract vehicles on their website.

Hot Tip: Make yourself and/or your organization easy to find through LinkedIn profiles with direct contact information, and websites with detailed descriptions of services, projects, and staff member qualifications.

Once you establish a partnership, prove your worth by delivering high-quality, timely work as part of the RFP process. Brainstorming and generating ideas about the scope of work, while challenging in itself, is easy compared to the business of putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard).

Hot Tip: Leverage your unique subject matter expertise and technical knowledge by being a thinking partner with the prime, helping them understand and work through the challenges implicit in the project. As requested, follow up with well-written tasks that address the RFP’s evaluation criteria within the allotted page count.

Hot Tip: Cement your value by providing professional bios, resumes, project examples, and organizational capacity statements per the prime’s timeline and in the requested format.

Primes view subcontractor and independent consultant contributions to the RFP process as a litmus test for contract performance. Whether the bid is won or lost, high performance will increase your opportunities for future work.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Independent Consulting TIG Week with our colleagues in the IC AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Hi! My name is Laura Keene, owner of Keene Insights in Los Angeles, CA. Not surprisingly, networking is an important part of my job, but the truth is: we all have to network. Even if you have a 9-to-5 job, you may be searching for new staff, collaborators, or other resources for your company, you may be looking for a new avenue of work within your organization, or you may be hunting for a dream job elsewhere.

Lesson Learned: Networking ain’t what it used to be.

When I first started my business, the idea of networking was daunting. Like many of you, I imagined that in order to sell my services I needed to mold myself into a 1950s used car salesman, i.e., be schmoozey and pushy. Turns out, a lot has changed since then.

In his book, To Sell is Human, Dan Pink writes: “Selling in all its dimensions – whether pushing Buicks on a car lot or pitching ideas in a meeting – has changed more in the last ten years than it did over the previous hundred.” He argues that because we live in a world where we have a mountain of information at our fingertips, sellers no longer have an advantage over buyers.

As a result, selling, and the use of networking as a sales strategy, has become more about connecting, sharing, and building strong relationships with people over time. When I learned that networking was less about closing deals and more about meeting new people, developing friendships, and sharing myself and my work with those friends (without worrying about when or if they’re going to hire me), it became a lot easier to do.

Hot Tip: Connect instead of network

Networking is still hard work, especially for us introverts, but the pressure is off. You don’t need to get the contract or land the new job.  You just need to meet and get to know some cool new people. Here are a few tips for doing so:

  • Relax and be yourself
  • Ask questions; find out about their work, their hobbies, their family
  • Share; let them learn about your work (and your passion for it), your hobbies, your family
  • Ask for a business card and jot notes about the person on the card…because the next step is to follow-up, share your connections and expertise, and build a relationship of trust.

Rad Resources

Check out Daniel Pink’s book To Sell is Human and, for those consultants out there who want a new angle on growing your business, pick up Michael Port’s Book Yourself Solid.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Independent Consulting TIG Week with our colleagues in the IC AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our IC TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Older posts >>

Archives

To top