AEA365 | A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators

CAT | Feminist Issues in Evaluation

Hi readers!  I am Kelly Grace and have been working in gender equity in education in Cambodia through the Lehigh University and Caring for Cambodia (CFC) partnership.

In 2014 our team in the department of Comparative and International Education at Lehigh University conducted an evaluation of the Gender Equity program at CFC schools in Siem Reap. The evaluation highlighted the importance of evaluating the impact of gender equity programs with boys in educational settings using a mixed-methods approach.  While the initial focus of our evaluation looked at the impact on girls, it became apparent that boys were aware of the program, inextricably linked to girls who participated in the program, and interested in contributing to a more gender equitable environment at school.

Another evaluation conducted by Lehigh University at the same time and in the same schools found that students who participated in the Student Council program held less traditional beliefs and attitudes on gender.  This evaluation was careful to include boys equally in the evaluation.  We hypothesize that more equitable gender attitudes and beliefs arise when girls hold leadership positions that enables them to work alongside boys in these leadership roles. These findings reinforced the findings that boys too play an important role in promoting an equitable school environment and in changing gender norms.

Hot Tip: Consider boys and men as an asset when evaluating the effectiveness of gender equity programs.   Conduct focus groups and interviews with boys who participate in gender equity programs and are connected to girls targeted in these programs to examine a potential “ripple effect” on knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

Lesson Learned:  Evaluations focusing on feminist issues should have strong methods to assess impacts on boys’ and men’s attitudes and beliefs on gender.  These methods should be seen as an integral component of the evaluation and should be well planned.

Rad Resources:

Men Engage: Provides a resource for developing a program that includes men and boys and has a monitoring and evaluation section.

Gender Responsive Pedagogy Handbook:  Includes components of gender responsive schools and was used as a key resource in our evaluation of the Caring For Cambodia Gender Equity program.

USAID Learning Lab: Provides online and collaborative resources on evaluation and monitoring with some gender related resources.

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I am Svetlana Negroustoueva, chair of the Feminist TIG and an expert in gender-responsive M&E of international development projects across sectors. I believe that M&E is an underutilized vehicle to enrich knowledge on gender and vulnerability issues. Gender-responsive M&E processes are important for ensuring that targets are met and outcomes and impacts can be assessed in relation to changes in the situation of women and girls, men and boys, and vulnerable populations.

Hot tip: When time and capacities preclude a proper gender analysis, use existing research to help identify gender and other socio-economic gaps at the outset of project design or M&E planning. Google USAID or other country or sector specific gender analysis documents, or Demographic and Health Survey data, or operations research.

Hot tip: Research gender policies of the project’s funder; most OECD donors such as USAID, DFID, Council of Europe, EU,  CIDA, and different agencies in the UN System, have those in place.  Check for evidence of their use in project documents that goes beyond the collection of sex-disaggregated data.

Lesson Learned: When developing questions, ensure that at least one evaluation (sub) question is related to advancing gender equality and/or women’s empowerment in the sectorial context. For example: Has the project developed a gender sensitive program approach to assist alternative energy project developers, businesses and consumers? Has the project reduced gender gaps in private financing advisory and mentoring services?

Hot tip: Relevant evaluation approaches and methods, such as feminist, empowerment, utilization-focused evaluations and outcome harvesting, would help surface both positive and negative unintended outcomes, and to facilitate the use of findings to serve the end beneficiaries.

Lesson Learned: Provide gender sensitivity training and explanations to team members, interviewers, data tabulators and data entry personnel. Without understanding why questions related to gender equality, the status of women and men, are there, many do not get answered in a way to provide substantial information.

Hot tip: Do not limit yourself to the provided list of stakeholders. Dig deeper to identify those who should have been involved in the project design, including sectorial gender experts and partners.

Hot Tip: Critically review an M&E Plan for presence of indicator, i.e indicators that are SMART in a gender-responsive ways to identify gender gaps and constraints, as well as opportunities. Even if a program has not developed a logic framework, you can construct a theory of change that would help identify entry points for integrating gender equality in program design and M&E processes.

Rad Resources:

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! We are Ghada Jiha and Bessa Whitmore, Program Co-Chairs of the Feminist Issues in Evaluation Topical Interest Group (Feminist TIG).

The TIG was established to highlight and promote feminist approaches in the field of evaluation. Feminist approaches acknowledge multiple perspectives and realities by examining the intersections of gender, race, class and sexuality in the context of power. They offer evaluators distinct ways of thinking, ways that are participatory, inclusive, empowering, that give voice to otherwise “unheard” and “invisible” groups, and that seek to further social justice agendas.

Rad Resources: In a year celebrating the Year of Evaluation and Exemplary Evaluations in a Multicultural World, the Feminist TIG takes this opportunity to highlight select panels and presentations at AEA 2015.

  • The “L” in Feminist Approaches to MEL: A Cross-organizational Reflection on Learning from the International Development Arena. Evaluators from CARE, Oxfam and UN Women will share how each organization has pursued “learning” with a feminist lens in the context of MEL as well as discuss innovations and challenges. (Nov. 12, 1:00 – 1:45 pm)
  • Framing Evaluations for At-Risk Groups in South Asia. Presenters will share the results of a study on maternal and child health issues among 172 sex workers in Kolkata, India and the findings of a paper exploring the lived realities of 39 highly vulnerable and trafficked girls. Using child-friendly, innovative participatory methods in their work, evaluators developed a framework to address this invisible population. (Nov. 12, 1:00 -1:45 pm)
  • Enhancing investigations of women’s empowerment: The papers in this session will showcase rigorous evaluation methods used to measure impacts on gender equality and women’s empowerment in international development programs. (Nov. 12, 7:00 – 7:45 am)
  • Dealing with power issues in evaluation: a multicultural approach from Latin America. In recent years, public policies in Latin America have been developed to respond to indigenous exclusion and discrimination. These policies, however, have not addressed underlying power structures such as gender relations. Drawing on experiences from Bolivia, Chile and Guatemala, this panel will offer reflections, strategies and lessons learned on dealing with and managing power issues in evaluation. (Nov. 14, 10:45-11:30 am)
  • Skills-building workshop: Poetry as a Mode of Inquiry and Presentation. Led by Sharon Brisolara, a poet and prominent feminist evaluator, participants will explore poetry as a mode of inquiry in evaluation. The session will demonstrate multiple ways of integrating poetry into various stages of the evaluation process and provide guidance on poem selection and use. (Nov. 13, 3:30-4:15 pm)

Please join us at our TIG business meeting on Thursday, November 12, 6:20 – 7:10 pm to learn more and connect with us.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi, I am Rituu B Nanda and I work on M&E, community engagement, participatory action research and knowledge management. I work with multiple organisations like Institute of Social Studies Trust (ISST), Anti-Slavery International, and Constellation. I moderate an international online community of practice (CoP) – Gender and Evaluation – under ISST’s project “Engendering Policy through Evaluation.”

Sharing of ideas and experiences is key in meaningful evaluation process. The CoP is aimed to bring together all interested in evaluation- commissioners of evaluation, researchers, evaluators, implementers, government officials, and policy makers. In India, we have a strong feminist evaluation group and have realized we have much more to learn from peers. Therefore we set up an international online community. Currently we have 1733 members.

Hot tip: Numbers are important, but far more important is a vibrant community. Features like blogs, videos and photos have given us an opportunity to share.

Hot tip: Encourage the use of the discussion forum to raise queries. For instance I recently attended a session on a photo voice tool at AES Conference and was keen to learn what was the experience of members. Members responded from different parts of the world to share their experience.

By offering members different tools we are trying to engage them to become content creators and participants in the discussion around the issues they work on.

Lessons Learned:

  • When I invite people to join the community, many of them say that they do not work in the field of gender and equity. Over the years I have realised that gender and equity is about using a specific lens at every stage in evaluation. We can use any methodology or approach.
  • I would love that language should not be a barrier for us to share. We will find a way around it by using google translate.

Thus, our endeavor is to create new knowledge, gather existing knowledge, organize, share and adapt it. We believe that if we continue to nurture a space that our members value, members can become the biggest advocates of our network. Our dream is to use these platforms to influence policy on gender and equity sensitive lens in evaluation.

Rad Resource: Consider this a warm invite to join our community…sign up at http://gendereval.ning.com/

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I am Donna Mertens, an independent consultant, hired by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to advise on the evaluation of an initiative funded in all 50 states and the US territories focused on the prevention of rape. Prevention programming consisted of educational programs for perpetrators and potential perpetrators.

The prevention of rape involves a critical assessment of the systemic forces that allow rape to continue. This sets up a challenge for evaluators to deal with this sensitive topic and to make visible changes in cultural values, beliefs, and actions that are associated with prevention of rape.

The CDC asked me to conduct training for their grantees in the Rape Prevention Education program on evaluation as a transformative strategy for preventing sexual violence. I began by acknowledging the resources that are available for evaluators to help them in situations like this and by highlighting the need for cultural competency on the part of the evaluator. I emphasized the need to be aware of the full range of stakeholders and those dimensions of diversity within and across stakeholder groups that are associated with a different understanding of the meaning of such concepts as masculinity, rape, and respect.

Rad resources: CDC and UN Women have a number of resources that are relevant for evaluators who want to do a transformative mixed methods cyclical evaluation on topics related to the reduction of violence against women, as well as for evaluations specifically focused on rape prevention.

Hot Tip: I recommended the use of a transformative mixed methods cyclical design to enable evaluators to identify appropriate stakeholders, address differences in power, and create results that were viewed as credible by the stakeholders and that could serve as a basis for action to address this critical human rights issue.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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I am Aysel Vazirova, PhD, an independent gender and development consultant. Recently, I completed an evaluation of a gender-based violence (GBV) program for Syrian refugee women and girls in Jordan, Lebanon, Northern Syria and Iraq. Evaluating humanitarian responses to violence against women and girl (VAWG) presents unique challenges. GBV in humanitarian settings occurs within a myriad of other human relations that are severely affected by conflict. As traditional support networks collapse, thousands of people become more vulnerable to abuse. Studies of VAWG in humanitarian crises commonly highlight a spike in sexual and physical violence.

How do we isolate VAWG from the continuum of violence that characterizes daily life in refugee camps? Feminist approaches place VAWG within a wider social system of gender-based inequality and discrimination. It is important to examine how crisis contexts affect gender relations, where all individuals are at heightened risk of violence. Cultural and social restrictions affecting women and girls’ access to resources, mobility and decision-making opportunities can make them more vulnerable to specific forms of abuse.

Hot Tip: When collecting data, conduct separate meetings with women, men, girls, and boys to elicit the specific needs, challenges, and barriers to access to services and resources of each group. They also ensure that a diverse set of voices are heard and prevent more vocal members from dominating the dialogue.

Hot Tip: Ask concrete questions about how decisions are made. Numerical representations, such as 50% of community council/committee members are women, do not necessarily translate into real, substantive equality.

Humanitarian responses are extremely complex: they bring together hundreds of large and small organizations to respond to a rapidly dynamic situation within a “cluster” system. Clusters are organized around particular sectors, such as “health”, “shelter”, and “protection” and engage all actors working in that cluster. VAWG falls under the “protection” cluster. While intended to boost coordination and to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of humanitarian responses, the cluster system has also contributed to creating silos.

Lesson Learned: Working in silos undermines the ability of humanitarian actors to address VAWG comprehensively. The feminist approach ensures that VAWG is addressed by and across each cluster: from the layout of a refugee camp, to the location of water and sanitation facilities, the placement of light fixtures in public spaces, the distribution of food or non-food items; the confidentiality of an examination room in a local healthcare facility, the availability of emergency contraception. These factors can increase or decrease women’s risks to physical attacks, sexual exploitation, rape or harassment.

Resource: Guidelines for Integrating Gender-Based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Actions (2015) provide detailed guidance for mainstreaming GBV prevention and mitigation in each cluster/sector.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello! I’m Nicole Clark, a licensed social worker and independent evaluator, specializing in working with nonprofits and city agencies to design, implement, and evaluate programs and services specifically for women and girls of color.

Women and girls of color face many intersectional issues connected to race and gender. When it comes to mainstream feminism, all too often the voices of Black, Latina, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native/Indigenous women are not always heard compared to their white counterparts.

Hot Tip: Avoid the “white feminist savior” complex. Feminist blogger Anne Thériault, wrote “The White Feminist Savior Complex. In the post, Thériault reacts to Teju Cole’s essay, The White Savior Industrial Complex, in which she began to understand that, in order to raise the voices of communities of color, people of color have to be the decision makers in how the issues they care about are addressed. Thériault shares, “…[T]he best and most important work that we can do is to listen to marginalized people, give them a platform from which they can reach a wider audience, and use our platforms to help amplify their voices. This is the real work that we should be doing. Anything else — any other way of ‘freeing’ women of color — is at best condescending…”

Lesson Learned: Recognize the ways in which you hold privilege. As a person of color, I am intentional in choosing which evaluation projects to work on because I am invested in all communities of color, especially women and girls of color. But I also have to recognize the ways in which I hold privilege. This is especially important when conducting evaluation work overseas. When we don’t recognize our privilege, it can affect our perception in ways that are hurtful to other can hurt the communities were are trying to help.

Rad Resource: Check out this poetry slam performance called “Feminism” from the 2014 Brave New Voices Festival, the nation’s first youth-centric poetry slam, and the most diverse spoken word event in the world. The performance features young poets as they tackle the topic of mainstream feminism, and highlights how race should not prevent women and girls of color from being a visible part of the movement for gender equality. While there is a long way to go towards fully realizing gender equality, the young women say in unison, “Feminism isn’t just for white women any more, and it never was. Even when we disagree, we are burning the table, [and] building a new one. No one is invited because everyone is already here.”

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hello, I’m Michael Bamberger. I have been working on gender issues since I prepared the Venezuela country gender assessment for the First Women’s World Conference in Mexico in 1974. I spent nine years with the Gender and Development Department of the World Bank and have had the good fortune to have consulted and taught gender evaluation with many development agencies around the world.

In September 2015 the UN General Assembly approved the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These 17 goals provide an ambitious set of targets to guide international development through 2030. They replace the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which were in effect from 2000-2015.

These goals will have a major influence on how international development is approached, financed, and evaluated. It is important for feminists and gender specialists to understand how gender issues are addressed in the SDGs. Below are the goal and subgoals that specifically address gender.

Goal 5: “Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”

Subgoals refer to:

  • Elimination of all forms of discrimination
  • Violence against women
  • Harmful practices such as child and/or forced marriage and female genital mutilation
  • Recognition of the value of unpaid work
  • Women’s full participation in leadership in all levels of decision-making
  • Universal access to universal and reproductive healthcare
  • (Under review) Equal rights to economic resources
  • (Under review) Enhance the use of information technology to promote the empowerment of women
  • (Under review) Support for legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls

Most other goals such as the end of poverty and hunger, ensuring healthy lives and access to education (among others) specifically recognize the need to ensure gender equality within each goal.

The challenge and opportunity for feminist evaluators is that work is now starting on the development of the framework for evaluating the success of the SDGs. The monitoring and evaluation systems of the MDGs were criticized for being too narrowly quantitative, ignoring issues relating to the quality of the services and to equity issues concerning access by the poorest and most vulnerable groups. The M&E systems were also criticized for being decontextualized and applying the same metric to all countries. There is an awareness of these issues and discussions are already underway on how to improve the quality of the data and how it is used for the SDGs. These issues will be a particular challenge for evaluating Goal 5 given the complex political, social, legal, economic, institutional and cultural factors sustaining gender inequalities and the fact that the evaluations must address difficult-to-measure qualitative indicators relating to power relations, self-image and mechanisms of social control (among many other factors).

Rad Resources:

  • “Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development” (2015). Provides a full list of the goals and sub-goals.
  • “Transform”. The first journal dedicated exclusively to gender responsive evaluation. UN women. Available on-line.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi! We are Kathryn Sielbeck-Mathes and Rebecca Selove, co-authors of Chapter 6 of “Feminist Evaluation and Research: Theory and Practice”. In our article, based on three evaluations of substance abuse treatment programs for individuals with co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse issues, we discuss the importance of framing and shared understanding between evaluators and evaluation stakeholders.

Lesson Learned: Despite linking closely with our own values of fairness, social justice and gender equity within social programming, we did not spend sufficient time understanding the differing values, language, perspectives, frames, etc., of the program manager and his staff, rather assuming we were all interpreting trauma in the same ways and sharing the same values associated with addressing trauma during treatment specifically and programming for women in general. In hindsight, focusing on this understanding should have held the same importance in the evaluation as monitoring fidelity and measuring outcomes.

Hot Tip:

In order to gain attention and respect for the adoption of feminist frameworks, principles, and values for conducting program evaluation, it is imperative that we frame our conversations to connect rather than compete, align rather than malign and foster acceptance rather than objection from those we need to communicate to and with. This requires an understanding of their position on issues that follow from the language or lens of their value and belief systems.

Lesson Learned: Connecting through words, images, symbols, and stories grounded in values helps make solutions accessible and relevant to program stakeholders, service organizations, and funding agencies. Linking an issue to a widely held cultural value or belief helps start the framing process by appealing to program managers and staff, increasing their interest in learning more.

Hot Tip:

If it seems as if you are not being heard….you probably are not. A feeling of frustration can be a signal that reconstruction of a shared meaning based upon shared values is necessary!

Lesson Learned: Key tasks associated with feminist evaluation include 1) understanding the problem from the perspective of the women the program is designed to serve, 2) studying the interior and external context of the program to understand the realities and lived experiences of women, and 3) identifying the invisible structures that can undermine even the most diverse, gender-responsive, trauma informed program.

Hot Tip:

Feminist evaluators must engage in attentive conversations with those implementing and managing human service/treatment programs, listening closely for congruence and dissonance regarding the feminist frame. From the outset of a program evaluation, the feminist evaluator must be mindful and prepared for changing assumptions and language/communication that perpetuates injustice and the disempowerment of women.

Rad Resource: Combating structural disempowerment in the stride towards gender equality: an argument for redefining the basis of power in gendered relationships.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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Hi! We are Silvia Salinas Mulder and Fabiola Amariles, co-authors of Chapter 9 of “Feminist Evaluation and Research: Theory and Practice”. Our article examines the fact that in our region, understanding and accepting gender mainstreaming as an international mandate is still slow and even decreasing in some political and cultural contexts, where the indigenous agenda and other internal and geopolitical issues are gaining prominence. Feminist evaluation may play an important role in getting evidence to create policies to improve the lives of women, but it is necessary to make feminist principles operational in the context of the multicultural Latin American countries.

Lesson Learned: We should re-consider and reflect on concepts and practices usually taken-for-granted like “participation.” In evaluations, members of the target population are usually treated as information resources but not as key audiences, owners and users of the findings and recommendations of the evaluation. Interactions with excluded groups usually reproduce hierarchical power relations and paternalistic communication patterns between the evaluator and the interviewed people, which may shape participation patterns, as well as the honesty and reliability of responses.

Hot Tip: Emphasize that everyone should have the real opportunity to participate and also to decline from participating (e.g., informed consent), and should not fear any implications of such a decision (e.g., formal or informal exclusion from future program activities). Having people decide about their own participation is a good indicator of ethical observance in the process.

Lesson Learned: Sensitivity and respect for the local culture often lead to misinterpreting rural communities as homogenous entities, paying little attention to internal diversity, inequality and power dynamics, which influence and are influenced by the micro-political atmosphere of an evaluation, oftentimes reproducing exclusion patterns.

Hot Tip: Pay attention and listen to formal leaders and representatives, but also search actively for the marginalized and most excluded people, enabling secure and confidential environment for them to speak. The role of cultural brokers knowledgeable of local culture is key to achieve an inclusive, context-sensitive approach to evaluation.

Lesson Learned: Another key concept to reflect on is “success.” On one hand, the approach of success as an objective and logically-derived conclusion of “neutral” analysis usually omits its power essence and intrinsic political and subjective dimensions. On the other hand, evaluation cultures that privilege limited funder-driven definitions of success reproduce ethnocentric perspectives, distorting experiences and findings, and diminishing their relevance and usefulness.

Hot Tip: Openly discussing the client’s and donor’s ideas about “success” and their expectations regarding a “good evaluation” beyond the terms of reference diminishes resistance to rigorous analysis and constructive criticism.

Rad Resources:

Silvia Salinas-Mulder and Fabiola Amariles on Gender, Rights and Cultural Awareness in Development Evaluation

Batliwala, S. & Pittman, A. (2010). Capturing Change in Women’s Realities.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Feminist Issues in Evaluation (FIE) TIG Week with our colleagues in the FIE Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our FIE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

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